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Cocos Malay is a post-creolized variety of Malay, spoken by the Cocos Malays of Home Island, Christmas Island, and those originally from the Cocos Islands currently living in Sabah. Cocos Malay derives from the Malay trade languages of the 19th century, specifically the Betawi language, with a strong additional Javanese influence. Malay is offered as a second language in schools, and Malaysian has prestige status; both are influencing the language, bringing it more in line with standard Malay. There is also a growing influence of English, considering the Islands having been an Australian territory and globalization drifting modern terms into the daily parlance.

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  • Basa Pulu Cocos
  • Cocos Islands Malay
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  • Cocos Malay is a post-creolized variety of Malay, spoken by the Cocos Malays of Home Island, Christmas Island, and those originally from the Cocos Islands currently living in Sabah. Cocos Malay derives from the Malay trade languages of the 19th century, specifically the Betawi language, with a strong additional Javanese influence. Malay is offered as a second language in schools, and Malaysian has prestige status; both are influencing the language, bringing it more in line with standard Malay. There is also a growing influence of English, considering the Islands having been an Australian territory and globalization drifting modern terms into the daily parlance.
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  • Cocos Malay
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  • Cocos Malay is a post-creolized variety of Malay, spoken by the Cocos Malays of Home Island, Christmas Island, and those originally from the Cocos Islands currently living in Sabah. Cocos Malay derives from the Malay trade languages of the 19th century, specifically the Betawi language, with a strong additional Javanese influence. Malay is offered as a second language in schools, and Malaysian has prestige status; both are influencing the language, bringing it more in line with standard Malay. There is also a growing influence of English, considering the Islands having been an Australian territory and globalization drifting modern terms into the daily parlance. It has the following characteristics: * Javanese influence: cucut "shark", kates "papaya", walikat "shoulderblade" etc. * First-person and second-person singular "gua" "lu", from Hokkien. * Causative verb "kasi". * "Ada" not only means "there is ...", but also is the progressive particle. * Possessive marker "punya". * Third person indefinite "ong", from orang "person"
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  • coa
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spoken in
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