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Operation Achse (German: Fall Achse, "Case Axis"), originally called Operation Alaric (German: Unternehmen Alarich), was the codename for the German plan to forcibly disarm the Italian armed forces after the armistice with the Allies in 1943.

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  • Operation Achse
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  • Operation Achse (German: Fall Achse, "Case Axis"), originally called Operation Alaric (German: Unternehmen Alarich), was the codename for the German plan to forcibly disarm the Italian armed forces after the armistice with the Allies in 1943.
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  • Operation Achse
has abstract
  • Operation Achse (German: Fall Achse, "Case Axis"), originally called Operation Alaric (German: Unternehmen Alarich), was the codename of the German plans to forcibly disarm the Italian armed forces after their expected armistice with the Allied forces in 1943. Several German divisions had already entered Italy after the fall of Benito Mussolini in July 1943 (the Grand Council of Fascism had deposed Mussolini on 25 July), while Italy was officially still an ally of Germany, despite the protests of the new Italian government under Pietro Badoglio.The Armistice of Cassibile (signed on 3 September 1943) was made public on 8 September. Then, the German forces moved rapidly to take over the Italian zones of occupation in the Balkans and southern France, and to disarm Italian forces in Italy. In some cases, the Italian troops resisted the Germans, most notably in the Greek island of Cephalonia, where over 5,100 men of the 33rd Acqui Division were executed after running out of ammunition and surrendering; in Rome, after the royal family and the government had fled, a disorganized defense by the Italian troops stationed around the capital was unable to defeat the German attack. In other cases, individual soldiers or whole units, like the 24th Pinerolo Division in Thessaly, went over to the local resistance movements. Only in Sardinia, Corsica, Calabria and in the southern part of Apulia were Italian troops able to offer considerable resistance and hold off the Germans until relieved by the arrival of Allied forces.
  • Operation Achse (German: Fall Achse, "Case Axis"), originally called Operation Alaric (German: Unternehmen Alarich), was the codename for the German plan to forcibly disarm the Italian armed forces after the armistice with the Allies in 1943. Several German divisions had entered Italy after the fall of Benito Mussolini in July 1943, while Italy was officially still an ally of Germany, despite the protests of the new Italian government under Pietro Badoglio.The Armistice of Cassibile was made public on 8 September. German forces moved rapidly to take over the Italian zones of occupation in the Balkans and southern France, and to disarm Italian forces in Italy. In some cases, the Italian troops, that had no superior orders and suffered many desertions, resisted the Germans, most notably in the Greek island of Cephalonia, where over 5,100 men of the 33rd Acqui Division were massacred after running out of ammunition and surrendering; in Rome, after the royal family and the government had fled, a disorganized defense by the Italian troops stationed around the capital was unable to defeat the German attack. Additionally, individual soldiers or whole units, like the 24th Pinerolo Division in Thessaly, went over to the local resistance movements. Only in Sardinia, Corsica, Calabria and in the southern part of Apulia were Italian troops able to offer successful resistance and hold off the Germans until relieved by the arrival of the Allies.
causalties
  • 20,000–30,000 killed
  • 800,000 prisoners
  • 5 midget submarines captured by Romanians, many more warships captured by the Germans
combatant
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Germany
  • Romania
  • Italy
  • Yugoslavia
commander
date
place of military conflict
result
  • German victory
  • German-Romanian victory
strength
  • 40 divisions (17 in Italy, 19 in the Balkans, 4 in France)
  • 60 divisions (26 in Italy, 31 in the Balkans, 3 in France)
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dbp:caption
  • Disarmed Italian soldiers marching to captivity in Bolzano.
dbp:casualties
dbp:combatant
  • Germany
  • Italy
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Romania
  • Yugoslavia
dbp:commander
  • Gerd von Rundstedt
  • Albert Kesselring
  • Erwin Rommel
  • Vittorio Ambrosio
  • Mario Roatta
  • Maximilian von Weichs
  • Alexander Löhr
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