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Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the noble or excellent ones [Aryas]", Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) is a term for parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta vary from text to text. These texts also name other parts of the Indian subcontinent as Brahmavarta, Madhyadesa, Panchala and others, with neither clear boundaries nor details about who lived in them. The Gurjara-Pratihara king in the tenth century was titled the Maharajadhiraja of Aryavarta.

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  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the noble or excellent ones [Aryas]", Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) is a term for parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta vary from text to text. These texts also name other parts of the Indian subcontinent as Brahmavarta, Madhyadesa, Panchala and others, with neither clear boundaries nor details about who lived in them. The Gurjara-Pratihara king in the tenth century was titled the Maharajadhiraja of Aryavarta.
  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) is a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
  • Dictionary no for prof this histry All wes editing and fak aryavarta Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) is a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) was a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) was a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Āryāvarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
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  • Āryāvarta
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  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the noble or excellent ones [Aryas]", Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) is a term for parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta vary from text to text. These texts also name other parts of the Indian subcontinent as Brahmavarta, Madhyadesa, Panchala and others, with neither clear boundaries nor details about who lived in them. The Manusmṛti (2.22) gives the name to "the tract between the Himalaya and the Vindhya ranges, from the Eastern Sea (Bay of Bengal) to the Western Sea (Arabian Sea)". The Vasistha Dharma Sutra I.8-9 and 12-13 locates the Āryāvarta to the east of the disappearance of the Sarasvati River in the desert, to the west of the Kālakavana, to the north of the Pariyatra Mountains and the Vindhya Range and to the south of the Himalayas. The Baudhayana Dharmasutra (BDS) 1.1.2.10 gives similar definitions and declares that Āryāvarta is the land that lies west of Kālakavana, east of Adarsana, south of the Himalayas and north of the Vindhyas, but in BDS 1.1.2.11 Āryāvarta is confined to the doab of the Ganges-Yamuna, and BDS 1.1.2.13-15. Patanjali's Mahābhāṣya defines Āryāvarta like the Vasistha Dharmasutra. The Gurjara-Pratihara king in the tenth century was titled the Maharajadhiraja of Aryavarta.
  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) is a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
  • Dictionary no for prof this histry All wes editing and fak aryavarta Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) is a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) was a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Aryavarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
  • Āryāvarta (Sanskrit: आर्यावर्त, lit. "abode of the Aryas" (noble or excellent ones), Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːrjaːˈʋərtə]) was a term for northern parts of the Indian subcontinent in the ancient Hindu texts such as Dharmashastras and Sutras. The limits of Āryāvarta extended over time, as reflected in the various sources, as the influence of the Brahmanical ideology spread eastwards in post-Vedic times.
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