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The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectical form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic Steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.

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  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectical form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic Steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic Steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • {{Infobox ethnic group| group = Alans| native_name = Alani| native_name_lang =| image = | image_caption = Map showing the migrations of the Alans| total = | total_year = | total_source = | total_ref = | genealogy =| regions =| languages = Scythian| philosophies =| religions =| related_groups = Ossetians, [[North Caucasian languages|North Caucasians]| footnotes =}} The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranic dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an [[Iranian peoples|Iranic] nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranic dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranic nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranic dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Their most popular name was Asy (plural of As) and there exist many variants and derivates like Assi, Ossi, Iassi, Iašy, Jaši, Jasz, Ossetians, Alani, Alans… Most of their members belong to the dominant Indo-European haplogroup R1a, many were bearers of the proto-Celtic haplogroup R1b (dominant also by the related, meanwhile also Turkified, Bashkirs) and a minority recruited from the surrounding ancestral Cimmerian - Tatar - paleo-Siberian haplogroups P and Q. Traces of archaic ancestral haplogroup K are possible, although still not documented. In North Caucasus the Alans mingled with the local Caucasian population of haplogroup G and the invading Ar
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the Northern Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus - generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus - generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people. First documented in the North Caucasus, after migrating there from Central Asia, they have usually been regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and were possibly also related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans to a Central Asia people known in Ancient Chinese sources as the Yancai, as well as the Aorsi of Roman sources.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century CE. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 CE, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century CE. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 CE the Goths broke their power on the Pontic Steppe.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the the Goths broke their power on the Pontic Steppe.Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around
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  • Alans
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  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectical form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic Steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic Steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic Steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a bobneds\\ powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • {{Infobox ethnic group| group = Alans| native_name = Alani| native_name_lang =| image = | image_caption = Map showing the migrations of the Alans| total = | total_year = | total_source = | total_ref = | genealogy =| regions =| languages = Scythian| philosophies =| religions =| related_groups = Ossetians, [[North Caucasian languages|North Caucasians]| footnotes =}} The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranic dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an [[Iranian peoples|Iranic] nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranic dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranic nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranic dialectal form of Aryan. Possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani) were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Their most popular name was Asy (plural of As) and there exist many variants and derivates like Assi, Ossi, Iassi, Iašy, Jaši, Jasz, Ossetians, Alani, Alans… Most of their members belong to the dominant Indo-European haplogroup R1a, many were bearers of the proto-Celtic haplogroup R1b (dominant also by the related, meanwhile also Turkified, Bashkirs) and a minority recruited from the surrounding ancestral Cimmerian - Tatar - paleo-Siberian haplogroups P and Q. Traces of archaic ancestral haplogroup K are possible, although still not documented. In North Caucasus the Alans mingled with the local Caucasian population of haplogroup G and the invading Arabs and Jews of haplogroup J. They were closely related to the ancient Aorsi and Wusun and their pastures reached to Eastern Siberia, where the Manchu, Amur Tatars, Chinese people, Mongols and other Indo-European Śaka (Scythian, e.g. Amyrgians, Sogdians), Tocharian and Aryan tribes, clans and dynasties of the Tarim Bassin and Central Asia were their southern neighbors. Their northern neighbors were some Cimmerian - Tatar, Paleo-Siberian and Tungusic peoples of haplogroups P and Q and Turkic hunters-gatherers of haplogroup N, who during the first millennium BCE started a massive expansion invading the homelands of the Alans and other Indo-Europeans, Manchus, Tatars, Mongols and even China subsequently invading the rest of Asia (incl. Iran, India, Mesopotamia and Arabia), Europe and North Africa (incl. Egypt and Libya). The 8th century Scythian uprising in the Altai area was crushed but the 13th century Mongol uprising resulting in a Mongol Empire and the cruelty of the Mongols stopped their expansion and the Mongols (haplogroup C) became for a couple of centuries the overlords of their giant empire, which by size was only surpassed by the British Empire of the Germanic Anglo-Saxons (haplogroup I). The Great Wall of China didn't stop the Turkic (Xiongnu) expansion and most Asy (Aśi, Assy, Alans) became violently Turkified by means of mankurtisation and the degenerated and corrupt ones voluntarily joined the Hunnic auxiliaries soon becoming the Turkic Aśina upper class. The Turks started invading Indo-European territory by raiding the Asy (Alanian) flocks, stealing their wives, daughters, horses and metal weapons and finally adopting the Indo-European customs like riding horses, writing, horticulture, using textiles instead of dog skins, using rugs and carpets instead of animal skins and using metals instead of wood, bones and stones. The remaining survivors pushed by the Turkic tribes and confederations, e.g. Xiongnu, Huns, Hephtalites, Kidarites, Göktürks, Oghuz Turks e.t.c. melted with the heavily Turkified Aorsi and entered the territory of the Royal Scythians (Śaka Paradraya), since the repulsion of the Neo Assyrian occupation at Nineveh also known as Sarmatians (Sauromatai, Sauromates). The names of those indigenous Sarmatian clans and clan based dynasties were: * Iakšamaty (Iaxamates), the royal guards of the Aryan Iakšaku dynasty serving until the time of Andhra Iakšaku, erroneously interpreted by Dravidian speakers as Ikšaku or Ikśvaku. The Iakšamaty also protected the trade routes (the northern branches of the Silk Road) connecting India and Europe directly along the Iakšartes river (Iaxartes, Syr-Daria). * Syracy (Siraci, Sirakoi, Siraces), also known for their trade colonies in Syria, Gallilea and on Sinai. * Zychy (Zichi, Iazyx, Iazyges, Zygii, Zygoi, Ziki, Zyx, Zygians, Jiqueti), who were often confused with Iassi (Asy, Alans) and Circassians. They also supported the Aryan Iakšaku dynasty as personal guards and sometimes intermarried with them. Their exquisite light cavalry protected the Slavic communities, e.g. Dacia, Pannonia, Bohemia along the Danube line, from Roman occupied Thrace to Venetian Limes Sorabicus along the Sołava (now Saale) and Łaba (now Elbe) rivers, from invasions of the Roman Empire and later from the Franks and Saxons. Their protection was crushed by massive invasions of Trajan. The Scottish Clan Lennox and Clan Drummond may be related to them. * Serboi (Serbs), whose homeland occupied by Turkic, Arab and Jewish invaders is now known as Dagestan. They joined their Kotyni (Cotini), Boiki (Boii), Sporoi, Kunoni, Łužicany (Lusatians), Vindelici, Veneti, Illyrioi (Illyrii, Illyrians), Makedoni (Makedones, Macedonians) and other relatives decimated by Roman and Germanic raids and living along the Carpathian Mountains, Sudetes, Ore Mountains, Alps and the Dinaric Alps and are now mostly known as Serbs and Sorbs (a corruption introduced by Saxon invaders). * Achaei, probably the ancestors of Achaeans, Danuna of the Amarna letters, Danaoi of Homer, Danaans, Tuatha Dé Danann, Achaemenid dynasty, Duninowie. Probably one of the earliest clans connected to the spread of Indo-European civilization, metallurgy, horse breeding, chariots, solar cult, the Plough (probably named after the ancient Slavic word płodzić = to procreate). The Trundholm sun chariot of the Aryan Iakšaku dynasty was definitively brought to named after them Dania by the Tuatha Dé Danann. According to Hindu mythology they may be descendants of Kaśyapa and his consort Danu, also reflected in Irish mythology. Danu is in both Hindu and Irish traditions the goddess of rivers and the names of many European rivers (Don, Dunaj, Dunajec, Danube…) are based on her name, which is still in use among Slavs as Danuta. * Heniochi another clan of (dangerous) early charioteers. Erroneously regarded as part of the Sarmatians but possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. The name of the Sea of Azov (Sea of the Asy) may originate from this period. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various invading Germanic tribes, then still known to the Thracians and Hellenes as Androphagi. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. In the Middle Ages the Turkified Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the Sarmatian territory in North Caucasus, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. A small group known as Jasz people accompanied by Turkic Cumans settled in Hungary. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an Iranian nomadic pastoral people of antiquity. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan. Their most popular name was Asy (plural of As) and there exist many variants and derivates like Assi, Ossi, Iassi, Iašy, Jaši, Jasz, Ossetians, Alani, Alans… Most of their members belong to the dominant Indo-European haplogroup R1a, many were bearers of the proto-Celtic haplogroup R1b (dominant also by the related, meanwhile also Turkified, Bashkirs) and a minority recruited from the surrounding ancestral Cimmerian - Tatar - paleo-Siberian haplogroups P and Q. Traces of archaic ancestral haplogroup K are possible, although still not documented. In North Caucasus the Alans mingled with the local Caucasian population of haplogroup G and the invading Arabs and Jews of haplogroup J. They were closely related to the ancient Aorsi and Wusun and their pastures reached to Eastern Siberia, where the Manchu, Amur Tatars, Chinese people, Mongols and other Indo-European Śaka (Scythian, e.g. Amyrgians, Sogdians), Tocharian and Aryan tribes, clans and dynasties of the Tarim Bassin and Central Asia were their southern neighbors. Their northern neighbors were some Cimmerian - Tatar, Paleo-Siberian and Tungusic peoples of haplogroups P and Q and Turkic hunters-gatherers of haplogroup N, who during the first millennium BCE started a massive expansion invading the homelands of the Alans and other Indo-Europeans, Manchus, Tatars, Mongols and even China subsequently invading the rest of Asia (incl. Iran, India, Mesopotamia and Arabia), Europe and North Africa (incl. Egypt and Libya). The 8th century Scythian uprising in the Altai area was crushed but the 13th century Mongol uprising resulting in a Mongol Empire and the cruelty of the Mongols stopped their expansion and the Mongols (haplogroup C) became for a couple of centuries the overlords of their giant empire, which by size was only surpassed by the British Empire of the Germanic Anglo-Saxons (haplogroup R1b). The Great Wall of China didn't stop the Turkic (Xiongnu) expansion and most Asy (Aśi, Assy, Alans) became violently Turkified by means of mankurtisation and the degenerated and corrupt ones voluntarily joined the Hunnic auxiliaries soon becoming the Turkic Aśina upper class. The Turks started invading Indo-European territory by raiding the Asy (Alanian) flocks, stealing their wives, daughters, horses and metal weapons and finally adopting the Indo-European customs like riding horses, writing, horticulture, using textiles instead of dog skins, using rugs and carpets instead of animal skins and using metals instead of wood, bones and stones. The remaining survivors pushed by the Turkic tribes and confederations, e.g. Xiongnu, Huns, Hephtalites, Kidarites, Göktürks, Oghuz Turks e.t.c. melted with the heavily Turkified Aorsi and entered the territory of the Royal Scythians (Śaka Paradraya), since the repulsion of the Neo Assyrian occupation at Nineveh also known as Sarmatians (Sauromatai, Sauromates). The names of those indigenous Sarmatian clans and clan based dynasties were: * Iakšamaty (Iaxamates), the royal guards of the Aryan Iakšaku dynasty serving until the time of Andhra Iakšaku, erroneously interpreted by Dravidian speakers as Ikšaku or Ikśvaku. The Iakšamaty also protected the trade routes (the northern branches of the Silk Road) connecting India and Europe directly along the Iakšartes river (Iaxartes, Syr-Daria). * Syracy (Siraci, Sirakoi, Siraces), also known for their trade colonies in Syria, Gallilea and on Sinai. * Zychy (Zichi, Iazyx, Iazyges, Zygii, Zygoi, Ziki, Zyx, Zygians, Jiqueti), who were often confused with Iassi (Asy, Alans) and Circassians. They also supported the Aryan Iakšaku dynasty as personal guards and sometimes intermarried with them. Their exquisite light cavalry protected the Slavic communities, e.g. Dacia, Pannonia, Bohemia along the Danube line, from Roman occupied Thrace to Venetian Limes Sorabicus along the Sołava (now Saale) and Łaba (now Elbe) rivers, from invasions of the Roman Empire and later from the Franks and Saxons. Their protection was crushed by massive invasions of Trajan. The Scottish Clan Lennox and Clan Drummond may be related to them. * Serboi (Serbs), whose homeland occupied by Turkic, Arab and Jewish invaders is now known as Dagestan. They joined their Kotyni (Cotini), Boiki (Boii), Sporoi, Kunoni, Łužicany (Lusatians), Vindelici, Veneti, Illyrioi (Illyrii, Illyrians), Makedoni (Makedones, Macedonians) and other relatives decimated by Roman and Germanic raids and living along the Carpathian Mountains, Sudetes, Ore Mountains, Alps and the Dinaric Alps and are now mostly known as Serbs and Sorbs (a corruption introduced by Saxon invaders). * Achaei, probably the ancestors of Achaeans, Danuna of the Amarna letters, Danaoi of Homer, Danaans, Tuatha Dé Danann, Achaemenid dynasty, Duninowie. Probably one of the earliest clans connected to the spread of Indo-European civilization, metallurgy, horse breeding, chariots, solar cult, the Plough (probably named after the ancient Slavic word płodzić = to procreate). The Trundholm sun chariot of the Aryan Iakšaku dynasty was definitively brought to named after them Dania by the Tuatha Dé Danann. According to Hindu mythology they may be descendants of Kaśyapa and his consort Danu, also reflected in Irish mythology. Danu is in both Hindu and Irish traditions the goddess of rivers and the names of many European rivers (Don, Dunaj, Dunajec, Danube…) are based on her name, which is still in use among Slavs as Danuta. * Heniochi another clan of (dangerous) early charioteers. Erroneously regarded as part of the Sarmatians but possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. The name of the Sea of Azov (Sea of the Asy) may originate from this period. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various invading Germanic tribes, then still known to the Thracians and Hellenes as Androphagi. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. In the Middle Ages the Turkified Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the Sarmatian territory in North Caucasus, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. A small group known as Jasz people accompanied by Turkic Cumans settled in Hungary. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the Northern Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the Northern Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic (Xiongnu) rule were turkicized and mankurtized and formed the influential Aśina warrior clan. Those Alans, who arrived at the Sarmatian core territory founded a powerful kingdom (vasal of the Khazar Khaganate) in the North Caucasus, based mainly around the kingdom of the Siraces (who were engaged defending the Roman and Germanic and subsequently Hunnic and Avar invasions in Central Europe) and bordering the Sarmatian kingdom of the remaining Zychy clan known as Zychia (then already populated mainly by Circassians), which ended with the Mongol invasions and conquests in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. After the Mongols became overlords of the Turkic Khaganates the Alans were included into the Mongol troops serving during the Turko-Mongol invasion in China (from around 1250) and founding of the Yuan dynasty. They became part of the Kheshig royal guards and were also used as police in Beijing. The descendants of those turkicized and subsequently mongolized Alans were known as Asud. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani), were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans or Alāns (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus. Generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae, the Alans have been connected by modern historians with the Central Asian Yancai and Aorsi of Chinese and Roman sources, respectively. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, they are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At the time, they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in the crossing of the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in the 6th century AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which ended with the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian. The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus - generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which survived until the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus - generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis.. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which survived until the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus - generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century AD. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis.. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which survived until the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people. First documented in the North Caucasus, after migrating there from Central Asia, they have usually been regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and were possibly also related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans to a Central Asia people known in Ancient Chinese sources as the Yancai, as well as the Aorsi of Roman sources. In the 1st century AD, having become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans were first mentioned by Roman sources. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 AD, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 AD, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 AD. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which survived until the Mongol invasions in the 13th century AD. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century CE. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 CE, their power on the Pontic Steppe was broken by the Goths. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 CE, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 CE along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 CE, they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans were soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 CE and subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 CE, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 CE. The Alans who remained under Hunnic rule founded a powerful kingdom in the North Caucasus in the Middle Ages, which survived until the Mongol invasions in the 13th century CE. These Alans are said to be the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into modern Ossetian.The name Alan is an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century CE. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 CE the Goths broke their power on the Pontic Steppe. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 CE, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 CE along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 CE they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans, soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 CE , subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 CE, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 CE. Those Alans who remained under Hunnic rule eventually founded in the 9th century CE the powerful kingdom of Alania in the North Caucasus; it survived until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century CE. Various Ossetian scholars regard these Alans as the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into the modern Ossetian language.The name Alan represents an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century CE. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 CE the Goths broke their power on the Pontic Steppe. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 CE, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 CE along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 CE they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans, soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 CE , subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 CE, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 CE. Those Alans who remained under Hunnic rule eventually founded the powerful kingdom of Alania in the North Caucasus in the 9th century CE; it survived until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century CE. Various Ossetian scholars regard these Alans as the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into the modern Ossetian language.The name Alan represents an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the . At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From the Goths broke their power on the Pontic Steppe.Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around , many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans, soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD , subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 AD, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534 AD. Those Alans who remained under Hunnic rule eventually founded the powerful kingdom of Alania in the North Caucasus in the 9th century AD; it survived until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century. Various Ossetian scholars regard these Alans as the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into the modern Ossetian language.The name Alan represents an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
  • The Alans (Latin: Alani) were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and become dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century CE. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 CE the Goths broke their power on the Pontic Steppe. Upon the Hunnic defeat of the Goths on the Pontic Steppe around 375 CE, many of the Alans migrated westwards along with various Germanic tribes. They crossed the Rhine in 406 AD along with the Vandals and Suebi, settling in Orléans and Valence. Around 409 AD they joined the Vandals and Suebi in crossing the Pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, settling in Lusitania and Hispania Carthaginensis. The Iberian Alans, soundly defeated by the Visigoths in 418 AD , subsequently surrendered their authority to the Hasdingi Vandals. In 428 CE, the Vandals and Alans crossed the Strait of Gibraltar into North Africa, where they founded a powerful kingdom which lasted until its conquest by forces of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in 534. Those Alans who remained under Hunnic rule eventually founded the powerful kingdom of Alania in the North Caucasus in the 9th century; it survived until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century CE. Various Ossetian scholars regard these Alans as the ancestors of the modern Ossetians. The Alans spoke an Eastern Iranian language which derived from Scytho-Sarmatian and which in turn evolved into the modern Ossetian language.The name Alan represents an Iranian dialectal form of Aryan.
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