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Ali Gomaa (Arabic: علي جمعة‎, Egyptian Arabic: [ˈʕæli ˈɡomʕæ]) is an Egyptian Islamic scholar, jurist, and public figure who has taken a number of controversial political stances. He specializes in Islamic Legal Theory. He follows the Shafi`i school of Islamic jurisprudence and the Ash'ari school of tenets of faith. Gomaa is a Sufi. He was succeeded as Grand Mufti by Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam in February 2013.

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  • Ali Gomaa
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  • Ali Gomaa (Arabic: علي جمعة‎, Egyptian Arabic: [ˈʕæli ˈɡomʕæ]) is an Egyptian Islamic scholar, jurist, and public figure who has taken a number of controversial political stances. He specializes in Islamic Legal Theory. He follows the Shafi`i school of Islamic jurisprudence and the Ash'ari school of tenets of faith. Gomaa is a Sufi. He was succeeded as Grand Mufti by Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam in February 2013.
  • Ali Gomaa (Arabic: علي جمعة‎, Egyptian Arabic: [ˈʕæli ˈɡomʕæ]) is an Egyptian Islamic scholar, Jurist, and public figure who has taken a number of controversial political stances. He specializes in Islamic Legal Theory. He follows the Shafi`i school of Islamic jurisprudence and the Ash'ari school of tenets of faith. Gomaa is a Sufi. He was succeeded as Grand Mufti by Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam in February 2013.
  • Ali Gomaa (Arabic: علي جمعة‎, Egyptian Arabic: [ˈʕæli ˈɡomʕæ]) is an Egyptian Islamic scholar, Jurist, and public figure who has taken a number of controversial political stances. He specializes in Islamic Legal Theory. He follows the Shafi`i school of Islamic jurisprudence and the Ash'ari school of tenets of faith. Gomaa is a Sufi. Gomaa is also a supporter of the 2013 Military Coup. He was succeeded as Grand Mufti by Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam in February 2013.
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  • Ali Gomaa
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  • Ali Gomaa (Arabic: علي جمعة‎, Egyptian Arabic: [ˈʕæli ˈɡomʕæ]) is an Egyptian Islamic scholar, jurist, and public figure who has taken a number of controversial political stances. He specializes in Islamic Legal Theory. He follows the Shafi`i school of Islamic jurisprudence and the Ash'ari school of tenets of faith. Gomaa is a Sufi. He served as the eighteenth Grand Mufti of Egypt (2003–2013) through Dar al-Ifta al-Misriyyah succeeding Ahmed el-Tayeb. He has, in the past, been considered a respected Islamic jurist, according to a 2008 U.S. News & World Report report and The National, and "a highly promoted champion of moderate Islam," according to The New Yorker. In more recent years, however, he has been characterized by Western scholarly observers as a supporter of "authoritarian" forms of government, and The New York Times notes in 2013 that he encouraged security forces to kill protesters against the Egyptian coup of that year. He was succeeded as Grand Mufti by Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam in February 2013.
  • Ali Gomaa (Arabic: علي جمعة‎, Egyptian Arabic: [ˈʕæli ˈɡomʕæ]) is an Egyptian Islamic scholar, Jurist, and public figure who has taken a number of controversial political stances. He specializes in Islamic Legal Theory. He follows the Shafi`i school of Islamic jurisprudence and the Ash'ari school of tenets of faith. Gomaa is a Sufi. He served as the eighteenth Grand Mufti of Egypt (2003–2013) through Dar al-Ifta al-Misriyyah succeeding Ahmed el-Tayeb. He has, in the past, been considered a respected Islamic jurist, according to a 2008 U.S. News & World Report report and The National, and "a highly promoted champion of moderate Islam," according to The New Yorker. In more recent years, however, he has been characterized by Western scholarly observers as a supporter of "authoritarian" forms of government, and The New York Times notes in 2013 that he encouraged security forces to kill protesters against the Egyptian coup of that year. He was succeeded as Grand Mufti by Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam in February 2013.
  • Ali Gomaa (Arabic: علي جمعة‎, Egyptian Arabic: [ˈʕæli ˈɡomʕæ]) is an Egyptian Islamic scholar, Jurist, and public figure who has taken a number of controversial political stances. He specializes in Islamic Legal Theory. He follows the Shafi`i school of Islamic jurisprudence and the Ash'ari school of tenets of faith. Gomaa is a Sufi. Gomaa is also a supporter of the 2013 Military Coup. He served as the eighteenth Grand Mufti of Egypt (2003–2013) through Dar al-Ifta al-Misriyyah succeeding Ahmed el-Tayeb. He has, in the past, been considered a respected Islamic jurist, according to a 2008 U.S. News & World Report report and The National, and "a highly promoted champion of moderate Islam," according to The New Yorker. In more recent years, however, he has been characterized by Western scholarly observers as a supporter of "authoritarian" forms of government, and The New York Times notes in 2013 that he encouraged security forces to kill protesters against the Egyptian coup of that year. He was succeeded as Grand Mufti by Shawki Ibrahim Abdel-Karim Allam in February 2013.
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