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Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment that espouses a dislike of or opposition to the American government or its policies, especially in regards to its foreign policy, or to the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.

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  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment that espouses a dislike of or opposition to the American government or its policies, especially in regards to its foreign policy, or to the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or opposes the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or opposes the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or opposes the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, New Zealand, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Pakistan, Serbia and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Pakistan and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Greece, Pakistan, Serbia and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Pakistan, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and the Greater Middle East, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a justified sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and the Greater Middle East, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole."
  • Americans are bad they don't believe in Chrstanity they believe that Chrstanity is considered as white race religion
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American"
  • Anti-Americanism (also called the owen hating community and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American
  • Anti-Americanism (also called the owen beamish with his mom ann ahern hating community and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called owen hatred and owenophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countri
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment owen hating comunity and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general.
  • [[File:Protests after US decision to withdraw from JCPOA, SIKE U THOUGHT , Tehran - 8 May 2018 26.jpg|thumb|right|300px|Two protesters in Iran tearing an American flag at an anti-American rally after the American withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan.]] Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general.
  • stupid donner 60 get a life Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general.
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  • Anti-Americanism
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has abstract
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment that espouses a dislike of or opposition to the American government or its policies, especially in regards to its foreign policy, or to the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms evolving to more politically-based criticism. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or opposes the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or opposes the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or opposes the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, New Zealand, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, Serbia, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Cuba, the Middle East, and North Korea, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Pakistan, Serbia and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Pakistan and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Greece, Pakistan, Serbia and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, the Middle East, Pakistan, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and North Korea but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and the Greater Middle East, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a justified sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led to the term being used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and the Greater Middle East, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment which espouses dislike of the American government or opposes its policies, especially its foreign policy, or espouses dislike or hatred of the American people and the United States in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and the Greater Middle East, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in Russia, China, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus and the Greater Middle East, but remain low in Vietnam, Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Korea, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe.
  • Americans are bad they don't believe in Chrstanity they believe that Chrstanity is considered as white race religion
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and South America such as Bolivia and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". According to an analysis by German historian Darius Harwardt of the Ruhr University Bochum, the term is nowadays mostly used to stifle debate by attempting to discredit viewpoints that oppose American policies. Harwardt has also noted that from 1980 onwards, the term has seen an increase in usage in German politics, for example to discredit those that wish to close American military bases in Germany, even though the criticism might be entirely valid and recent polls have shown that the plurality of Germans do in fact wish the withdrawal of US troops. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called the owen hating community and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". According to an analysis by German historian Darius Harwardt of the Ruhr University Bochum, the term is nowadays mostly used to stifle debate by attempting to discredit viewpoints that oppose American policies. Harwardt has also noted that from 1980 onwards, the term has seen an increase in usage in German politics, for example to discredit those that wish to close American military bases in Germany, even though the criticism might be entirely valid and recent polls have shown that the plurality of Germans do in fact wish the withdrawal of US troops. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called the owen beamish with his mom ann ahern hating community and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". According to an analysis by German historian Darius Harwardt of the Ruhr University Bochum, the term is nowadays mostly used to stifle debate by attempting to discredit viewpoints that oppose American policies. Harwardt has also noted that from 1980 onwards, the term has seen an increase in usage in German politics, for example to discredit those that wish to close American military bases in Germany, even though the criticism might be entirely valid and recent polls have shown that the plurality of Germans do in fact wish the withdrawal of US troops. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called owen hatred and owenophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". According to an analysis by German historian Darius Harwardt of the Ruhr University Bochum, the term is nowadays mostly used to stifle debate by attempting to discredit viewpoints that oppose American policies. Harwardt has also noted that from 1980 onwards, the term has seen an increase in usage in German politics, for example to discredit those that wish to close American military bases in Germany, even though the criticism might be entirely valid and recent polls have shown that the plurality of Germans do in fact wish the withdrawal of US troops. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment owen hating comunity and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". According to an analysis by German historian Darius Harwardt of the Ruhr University Bochum, the term is nowadays mostly used to stifle debate by attempting to discredit viewpoints that oppose American policies. Harwardt has also noted that from 1980 onwards, the term has seen an increase in usage in German politics, for example to discredit those that wish to close American military bases in Germany, even though the criticism might be entirely valid and recent polls have shown that the plurality of Germans do in fact wish the withdrawal of US troops. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • [[File:Protests after US decision to withdraw from JCPOA, SIKE U THOUGHT , Tehran - 8 May 2018 26.jpg|thumb|right|300px|Two protesters in Iran tearing an American flag at an anti-American rally after the American withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan.]] Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". According to an analysis by German historian Darius Harwardt of the Ruhr University Bochum, the term is nowadays mostly used to stifle debate by attempting to discredit viewpoints that oppose American policies. Harwardt has also noted that from 1980 onwards, the term has seen an increase in usage in German politics, for example to discredit those that wish to close American military bases in Germany, even though the criticism might be entirely valid and recent polls have shown that the plurality of Germans do in fact wish the withdrawal of US troops. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
  • stupid donner 60 get a life Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is prejudice, fear or hatred of the American government, its foreign policy, or the American people in general. Political scientist Brendon O'Connor of the United States Studies Centre in Australia suggests that "anti-Americanism" cannot be isolated as a consistent phenomenon, since the term originated as a rough composite of stereotypes, prejudices, and criticisms which evolved into more politically-based criticisms. French scholar Marie-France Toinet says that use of the term "anti-Americanism" is "only fully justified if it implies systematic opposition – a sort of allergic reaction – to America as a whole." Scholars such as Noam Chomsky and Nancy Snow have argued that the application of the term "anti-American" to other countries or their populations is nonsensical, as it implies that disliking the American government or its policies is socially undesirable or even comparable to a crime. In this regard, the term has been likened to the propagandistic usage of the term "anti-Sovietism" in the USSR. Discussions on anti-Americanism have in most cases lacked a precise explanation of what the sentiment entails (other than a general disfavor), which has led the term to be used broadly and in an impressionistic manner, resulting in the inexact impressions of the many expressions described as anti-American. Author and expatriate William Russell Melton described that criticism for the United States largely originates from the perception that the U.S. wants to act as a "world policeman". According to an analysis by German historian Darius Harwardt of the Ruhr University Bochum, the term is nowadays mostly used to stifle debate by attempting to discredit viewpoints that oppose American policies. Harwardt has also noted that from 1980 onwards, the term has seen an increase in usage in German politics, for example to discredit those that wish to close American military bases in Germany, even though the criticism might be entirely valid and recent polls have shown that the plurality of Germans do in fact wish the withdrawal of US troops. Negative or critical views of the United States or its influence are widespread in places such as Russia, North Korea, China, Iran, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus the Greater Middle East and Latin America such as Bolivia, Mexico and Venuzuela, with disagreements and skepticism of its foreign policies more widespread, including some NATO countries such as France, Germany and Spain. On the other hand, it remains low in Israel, the Philippines, Sub-Saharan Africa, and certain countries in central and eastern Europe such as Poland and Hungary.
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