About: Baltimore mayoral election, 1999     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : owl:Thing, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FBaltimore_mayoral_election%2C_1999

On November 2, 1999, the city of Baltimore, Maryland, elected a new mayor, the 47th in the city's history. Primary elections were held to determine the nominees for the Democratic Party and Republican Party on September 14. Incumbent mayor Kurt Schmoke, a Democrat, opted not to run for reelection.

AttributesValues
thumbnail
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
rdfs:comment
  • On November 2, 1999, the city of Baltimore, Maryland, elected a new mayor, the 47th in the city's history. Primary elections were held to determine the nominees for the Democratic Party and Republican Party on September 14. Incumbent mayor Kurt Schmoke, a Democrat, opted not to run for reelection.
rdfs:label
  • Baltimore mayoral election, 1999
has abstract
  • On November 2, 1999, the city of Baltimore, Maryland, elected a new mayor, the 47th in the city's history. Primary elections were held to determine the nominees for the Democratic Party and Republican Party on September 14. Incumbent mayor Kurt Schmoke, a Democrat, opted not to run for reelection. Martin O'Malley, a member of the Baltimore City Council, won the election to succeed Schmoke.Because Baltimore's electorate is overwhelmingly Democratic, whoever won the Democratic primary election was seen as the favorite over the Republican nominee in the general election. Baltimore's large African American population initially made it seem likely that the next mayor would also be African American. Kweisi Mfume was the preferred candidate of local politicians, but he opted not to run. Though Carl Stokes and Lawrence Bell, members of the City Council, declared for the race, local leaders were underwhelmed with the quality of declared candidates.In 1999, Baltimore experienced high rates of murder and unemployment, and had a failing city school system. O'Malley declared his candidacy, focusing his campaign on a "zero tolerance" approach to crime. He received endorsements from many of the city's African American leaders. After a close race, O'Malley overtook both Stokes and Bell to win the Democratic nomination, which all but assured him of victory in the general election. He defeated Republican candidate David F. Tufaro in the general election by an overwhelming majority.
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
extraction datetime
Link to the Wikipage history URL
Wikipage page ID
page length (characters) of wiki page
Wikipage modification datetime
Wiki page out degree
Wikipage revision ID
Link to the Wikipage revision URL
dbp:candidate
  • Martin O'Malley
  • Carl Stokes (Baltimore)
  • David F. Tufaro
  • Lawrence Bell
  • Martin O'Malley
  • A. Robert Kaufman
  • Arthur Cuffie, Jr.
  • Bernard Kempa
  • Carl M. Adair
  • Charles A. Dugger
  • Gene Lamar Michaels
  • Jessica June Davis
  • John William Hahn
  • Lynwood H. Leverette
  • Mary W. Conaway
  • Melanie M. Taylor
  • Phillip A. Brown, Jr.
  • Richard A. Darrah
  • Richard Riha
  • Robert S. "Bobby" Cunningham
  • Roberto Marsili
  • Sandra Okwaye
  • Vincent Phillip Fullard
  • William Edward Roberts, Sr.
dbp:image
dbp:ongoing
  • no
dbp:party
  • Democratic Party
  • Republican Party
dbp:percentage
dbp:title
  • Mayor
dbp:type
  • Presidential
dbp:votes
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Sep 1 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2021 OpenLink Software