About: Boss (engineering)     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : owl:Thing, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FBoss_%28engineering%29

In engineering, a boss is a protruding feature on a work piece. A common use for a boss is to locate one object within a pocket or hole of another object. For instance, some motors use a precisely machined boss on the front face to locate it on the mating part. Like a process on a bone, bosses on castings can provide attachment points or bearing surfaces. A boss can also be a brass eyelet on a sail. It is a generic term to describe an item designed to facilitate the use with, within, on or around another item whereby one cannot operate properly without the other.

AttributesValues
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
rdfs:comment
  • In engineering, a boss is a protruding feature on a work piece. A common use for a boss is to locate one object within a pocket or hole of another object. For instance, some motors use a precisely machined boss on the front face to locate it on the mating part. Like a process on a bone, bosses on castings can provide attachment points or bearing surfaces. A boss can also be a brass eyelet on a sail. It is a generic term to describe an item designed to facilitate the use with, within, on or around another item whereby one cannot operate properly without the other.
rdfs:label
  • Boss (engineering)
has abstract
  • In engineering, a boss is a protruding feature on a work piece. A common use for a boss is to locate one object within a pocket or hole of another object. For instance, some motors use a precisely machined boss on the front face to locate it on the mating part. Like a process on a bone, bosses on castings can provide attachment points or bearing surfaces. The term 'boss' when used in engineering can also relate to a finishing edge around (usually) a circular opening that allows the opening to locate onto, or within another opening thus locating or joining two items together with a view to the location or joining being temporary or semi-permanent.A common everyday example of a boss is the housing of the rotation spindle in a washing machine drum, or on a cylinder lawn mower at the end of the cutting blade cylinder which may house a bearing set to allow the cylinder to rotate through one plane, but held firm in another plane. A boss can also be a brass eyelet on a sail. It is a generic term to describe an item designed to facilitate the use with, within, on or around another item whereby one cannot operate properly without the other. The word 'boss' is also often used to describe the end of a shaft on a boat to which a propeller might attach. A boss may also refer to a mounting feature that will receive a screw or thread-forming screw. In computer-aided design applications, a boss is a feature used to describe a type of extrusion. The word boss comes from the Middle French word embocer, which means protuberance.
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
extraction datetime
Link to the Wikipage history URL
Wikipage page ID
page length (characters) of wiki page
Wikipage modification datetime
Wiki page out degree
Wikipage revision ID
Link to the Wikipage revision URL
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
is foaf:primaryTopic of
is Wikipage disambiguates of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Sep 1 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2021 OpenLink Software