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Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman who settled in the Kingdom of Hawaii during the 19th century. He eventually became the first Chinese millionaire on the islands. He served as a commercial agent and diplomatic consul for the Qing Dynasty to the Kingdom of Hawaii and was a member of King Kalākaua's Privy Council.

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  • Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman who settled in the Kingdom of Hawaii during the 19th century. He eventually became the first Chinese millionaire on the islands. He served as a commercial agent and diplomatic consul for the Qing Dynasty to the Kingdom of Hawaii and was a member of King Kalākaua's Privy Council.
  • Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman who settled in the Hawaiian Kingdom during the 19th century. He immigrated to Hawaii from Guangdong in 1849 and adopted the surname Afong after the diminutive form of his given name. He made a fortune investing in retail, shipping, opium sales, and sugar and coffee plantations, eventually becoming the first Chinese millionaire on the islands. He briefly served as the commercial agent and diplomatic consul for the Qing Dynasty to the Hawaiian Kingdom and was a member of King Kalākaua's Privy Council.
  • Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman and philanthropist who settled in the Hawaiian Kingdom during the 19th century and build a business empire in Hawaii, Macau and Hong Kong. He immigrated to Hawaii from Guangdong in 1849 and adopted the surname Afong after the diminutive form of his Cantonese given name, Ah Fong.
  • ‹See TfM›(This is a Chinese name; the family name is Chun (Chen).) Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman and philanthropist who settled in the Hawaiian Kingdom during the 19th century and built a business empire in Hawaii, Macau and Hong Kong. He immigrated to Hawaii from Guangdong in 1849 and adopted the surname Afong after the diminutive form of his Cantonese given name, Ah Fong.
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  • Chun Afong
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  • Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman who settled in the Kingdom of Hawaii during the 19th century. He eventually became the first Chinese millionaire on the islands. He served as a commercial agent and diplomatic consul for the Qing Dynasty to the Kingdom of Hawaii and was a member of King Kalākaua's Privy Council.
  • Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman who settled in the Hawaiian Kingdom during the 19th century. He immigrated to Hawaii from Guangdong in 1849 and adopted the surname Afong after the diminutive form of his given name. He made a fortune investing in retail, shipping, opium sales, and sugar and coffee plantations, eventually becoming the first Chinese millionaire on the islands. He briefly served as the commercial agent and diplomatic consul for the Qing Dynasty to the Hawaiian Kingdom and was a member of King Kalākaua's Privy Council. While retaining a separate family in China, Afong married Hawaiian-British noblewoman Julia Fayerweather Afong, a marriage which brought with it closer ties to the Hawaiian nobility and ruling class. Afong raised a large mixed-race family which include many daughters. After four decades in Hawaii, Afong retired to his home village in 1890 leaving Julia and most of her children behind. He relocated his business empire to Macau and Hong Kong. In his last years, his charitable deeds were recognized by the Guangxu Emperor who erected the Meixi Memorial Archways in his home village where he died in 1906. His life has been caricatured in 1912 short-story "Chun Ah Chun", by American novelist Jack London and 13 Daughters, a short-lived 1961 Broadway musical written by his great-grandson.
  • Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman and philanthropist who settled in the Hawaiian Kingdom during the 19th century and build a business empire in Hawaii, Macau and Hong Kong. He immigrated to Hawaii from Guangdong in 1849 and adopted the surname Afong after the diminutive form of his Cantonese given name, Ah Fong. Afong started off working for his uncle's retail store in Honolulu and later became the co-owner of a chain of stores selling Oriental novelties. In due time, he made a fortune investing in retail, shipping, opium sales, and sugar and coffee plantations, eventually becoming the first Chinese millionaire on the islands. In 1856, Afong helped organize a ball in honor of the wedding of King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma that helped to solidify the Chinese community's position in Honolulu. He briefly served as the commercial agent and diplomatic consul for the Qing Dynasty to the Hawaiian Kingdom and was a member of King Kalākaua's Privy Council. While retaining a separate family in China, Afong married Hawaiian-British noblewoman Julia Fayerweather Afong, a marriage which brought with it closer ties to the Hawaiian nobility and ruling class. They raised a large mixed-race family which included many daughters and two sons: Chun Chik-yu and Chun Lung (his eldest son from his Chinese wife), who assisted him with his business empires. After four decades in Hawaii, Afong retired to his home village in 1890 leaving Julia and most of her children behind. He relocated his business empire to Macau and Hong Kong. In his last years, his charitable deeds were recognized by the Guangxu Emperor who erected the Meixi Memorial Archways and made him a mandarin of the first rank. He died in his home village in 1906. His life has been caricatured in 1912 short-story "Chun Ah Chun", by American novelist Jack London and 13 Daughters, a short-lived 1961 Broadway musical written by his great-grandson. In 1997, Bob Dye, who married on of Afong's descendants, wrote a book chronicling his life titled Merchant Prince of the Sandalwood Mountains: Afong and the Chinese in Hawaiʻi
  • ‹See TfM›(This is a Chinese name; the family name is Chun (Chen).) Chun Afong (Chinese: 陳芳; pinyin: Chén Fāng; 1825 – September 25, 1906) was a Chinese businessman and philanthropist who settled in the Hawaiian Kingdom during the 19th century and built a business empire in Hawaii, Macau and Hong Kong. He immigrated to Hawaii from Guangdong in 1849 and adopted the surname Afong after the diminutive form of his Cantonese given name, Ah Fong. Afong started off working for his uncle's retail store in Honolulu and later became the co-owner of a chain of stores selling Oriental novelties. In due time, he made a fortune investing in retail, shipping, opium sales, and sugar and coffee plantations, eventually becoming the first Chinese millionaire on the islands. In 1856, Afong helped organize a ball in honor of the wedding of King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma that helped to solidify the Chinese community's position in Honolulu. He briefly served as the commercial agent and diplomatic consul for the Qing Dynasty to the Hawaiian Kingdom and was a member of King Kalākaua's Privy Council. While retaining a separate family in China, Afong married Hawaiian-British noblewoman Julia Fayerweather Afong, a marriage which brought with it closer ties to the Hawaiian nobility and ruling class. They raised a large mixed-race family which included many daughters and two sons: Chun Chik-yu and Chun Lung (his eldest son from his Chinese wife), who assisted him with his business empires. After four decades in Hawaii, Afong retired to his home village in 1890 leaving Julia and most of her children behind. He relocated his business empire to Macau and Hong Kong. In his last years, his charitable deeds were recognized by the Guangxu Emperor who erected the Meixi Memorial Archways and made him a mandarin of the first rank. He died in his home village in 1906. His life has been caricatured in 1912 short-story "Chun Ah Chun", by American novelist Jack London and 13 Daughters, a short-lived 1961 Broadway musical written by his great-grandson. In 1997, Bob Dye, who married one of Afong's descendants, wrote a book chronicling his life titled Merchant Prince of the Sandalwood Mountains: Afong and the Chinese in Hawaiʻi.
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