About: Dōngzhì Festival     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : dbo:TimeInterval, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FDongzhi_Festival

The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; literally: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).

AttributesValues
rdf:type
thumbnail
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Dongzhi (冬至)
  • Dongzhi Festival
  • Flour Ball Day
foaf:nick
  • Dongji (동지)
  • Tang-cheh (冬節)
  • Tōji (冬至)
  • TuNji (とぅんじ・冬至)
  • Tunji (とぅんじ・冬至)
rdfs:comment
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; literally: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit.: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit.: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 (according to East Asia time) abd is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA)
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 (according to East Asia time) and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA)
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA)
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA)
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA)
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time.
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice), some day between December 21 to December 23.
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'winter's extreme') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice), some day between December 21 to December 23.
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'winter's extreme') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice), some day between December 21 to December 23.
rdfs:label
  • Dongzhi Festival
has abstract
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; literally: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time). The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; literally: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time). The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit.: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time). The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit.: 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time). The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time). The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time). The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time). The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 (according to East Asia time) abd is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA) The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 (according to East Asia time) and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA) The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA) The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival also called Flour Ball Day (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA) The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time and is more important than Chinese New Year (according to AMA) The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around or during December 22 or sometimes on the 21st around tea time. The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'the extreme of winter') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice), some day between December 21 to December 23. The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'winter's extreme') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice), some day between December 21 to December 23. The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
  • The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; lit. 'winter's extreme') is one of the most important Chinese and East Asian festivals celebrated by the Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice), some day between December 21 to December 23. The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (Chinese: 復, "Returning").
meaning
  • Marks the winter solstice
similar
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
Link from a Wikipage to an external page
extraction datetime
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Sep 1 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2021 OpenLink Software