About: Eureka Flag     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : yago:Whole100003553, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FEureka_Flag

The Eureka Flag is a flag design which features dark blue field 260 cm × 400 cm (100 in × 160 in) (2:3.08 ratio); a horizontal stripe 37 cm (15 in) wide and a vertical line crossing it of 36 centimetres (14 in) wide; and 5 eight pointed stars, the central star being 65 cm (26 in) tall (point to point) and the other stars 60 cm (24 in) tall, representing the Crux Australis constellation.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
thumbnail
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
rdfs:comment
  • The Eureka Flag is a flag design which features dark blue field 260 cm × 400 cm (100 in × 160 in) (2:3.08 ratio); a horizontal stripe 37 cm (15 in) wide and a vertical line crossing it of 36 centimetres (14 in) wide; and 5 eight pointed stars, the central star being 65 cm (26 in) tall (point to point) and the other stars 60 cm (24 in) tall, representing the Crux Australis constellation.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. A number of people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. An estimated crowd of over 10,000 people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. An estimated crowd of over 10,000 people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. It is listed as an object of significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian icon by the National Trust in 2006.
rdfs:label
  • Eureka Flag
has abstract
  • The Eureka Flag is a flag design which features dark blue field 260 cm × 400 cm (100 in × 160 in) (2:3.08 ratio); a horizontal stripe 37 cm (15 in) wide and a vertical line crossing it of 36 centimetres (14 in) wide; and 5 eight pointed stars, the central star being 65 cm (26 in) tall (point to point) and the other stars 60 cm (24 in) tall, representing the Crux Australis constellation. The design was first used as the war flag of the Eureka Rebellion (3 December 1854) at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. A number of people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at its first flying at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. The flag was lent to the Museum of Australian Democracy at Eureka (MADE) by the Art Gallery of Ballarat in 2013. The City of Ballarat ended its arrangement with the independently operated MADE and it closed in March 2018. The building opened again to the public in April 2018, with the flag retained as the centrepiece of a visitor experience now branded as the Eureka Centre Ballarat. The flag design has gained wider notability in Australian culture due to its adoption as a symbol of democracy, egalitarianism, and general purpose symbol of protest, mainly in relation to a variety of anti-establishment, non-conformist causes. It is listed as an object of state heritage significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian Icon by the National Trust in 2006. It is well established as a symbol of trade unionism in Australia. More recently, it has been adopted by right-wing organizations and political parties, much to the frustration of more established socialist and progressive claimants.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. A number of people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. The field is Prussian blue measuring 260 cm × 400 cm (2:3.08 ratio) and made from fine woollen fabric. The horizontal cross is 37 cm wide and the vertical cross 36 cm wide. The central star is slightly larger than the others being 65 cm tall from point to point and the other stars 60 cm. The white stars are made from fine cotton lawn and the off-white cross from cotton twill. The flag was lent to the Museum of Australian Democracy at Eureka (MADE) by the Art Gallery of Ballarat in 2013. The City of Ballarat ended its arrangement with the independently operated MADE and it closed in March 2018. The building opened again to the public in April 2018, with the flag retained as the centrepiece of a visitor experience now branded as the Eureka Centre Ballarat. The flag design has gained wider notability in Australian culture due to its adoption as a symbol of democracy, egalitarianism, and general purpose symbol of protest, mainly in relation to a variety of anti-establishment, non-conformist causes. It is listed as an object of state heritage significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian Icon by the National Trust in 2006. It is well established as a symbol of trade unionism in Australia. More recently, it has been adopted by right-wing organizations and political parties, much to the frustration of more established socialist and progressive claimants.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. An estimated crowd of over 10,000 people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. The field is Prussian blue measuring 260 cm × 400 cm (2:3.08 ratio) and made from fine woollen fabric. The horizontal cross is 37 cm wide and the vertical cross 36 cm wide. The central star is slightly larger than the others being 65 cm tall from point to point and the other stars 60 cm. The white stars are made from fine cotton lawn and the off-white cross from cotton twill. The flag was lent to the Museum of Australian Democracy at Eureka (MADE) by the Art Gallery of Ballarat in 2013. The City of Ballarat ended its arrangement with the independently operated MADE and it closed in March 2018. The building opened again to the public in April 2018, with the flag retained as the centrepiece of a visitor experience now branded as the Eureka Centre Ballarat. The flag design has gained wider notability in Australian culture due to its adoption as a symbol of democracy, egalitarianism, and general purpose symbol of protest, mainly in relation to a variety of anti-establishment, non-conformist causes. It is listed as an object of state heritage significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian Icon by the National Trust in 2006. It is well established as a symbol of trade unionism in Australia. More recently, it has been adopted by right-wing organizations and political parties, much to the frustration of more established socialist and progressive claimants.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. An estimated crowd of over 10,000 people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. The field is Prussian blue measuring 260 cm × 400 cm (2:3.08 ratio) and made from fine woollen fabric. The horizontal cross is 37 cm wide and the vertical cross 36 cm wide. The central star is slightly larger than the others being 65 cm tall from point to point and the other stars 60 cm. The white stars are made from fine cotton lawn and the off-white cross from cotton twill. The flag design has gained wider notability in Australian culture due to its adoption as a symbol of democracy, egalitarianism, and general purpose symbol of protest, mainly in relation to a variety of anti-establishment, non-conformist causes. It is listed as an object of state heritage significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian Icon by the National Trust in 2006. It is well established as a symbol of trade unionism in Australia. More recently, it has been adopted by right-wing organizations and political parties, much to the frustration of more established socialist and progressive claimants.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. An estimated crowd of over 10,000 people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. The field is Prussian blue measuring 260 cm × 400 cm (2:3.08 ratio) and made from fine woollen fabric. The horizontal cross is 37 cm wide and the vertical cross 36 cm wide. The central star is slightly larger than the others being 65 cm tall from point to point and the other stars 60 cm. The white stars are made from fine cotton lawn and the off-white cross from cotton twill. The flag design has gained wider notability in Australian culture due to its adoption as a symbol of democracy, egalitarianism, and general purpose symbol of protest, mainly in relation to a variety of anti-establishment, non-conformist causes. More recently, it has been adopted by right-wing organizations and political parties, much to the frustration of more established socialist and progressive claimants. It is listed as an object of significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian icon by the National Trust in 2006.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. An estimated crowd of over 10,000 people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. The field is Prussian blue measuring 260 cm × 400 cm (2:3.08 ratio) and made from fine woollen fabric. The horizontal cross is 37 cm wide and the vertical cross 36 cm wide. The central star is slightly larger than the others being 65 cm tall from point to point and the other stars 60 cm. The white stars are made from fine cotton lawn and the off-white cross from cotton twill. It is listed as an object of significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian icon by the National Trust in 2006.
  • The Eureka Flag is the war flag flown at the battle of the Eureka Stockade that took place on 3 December 1854 at Ballarat in Victoria, Australia. An estimated crowd of over 10,000 people swore allegiance to the flag as a symbol of defiance at Bakery Hill on 29 November 1854. Over 30 miners were killed at the Eureka Stockade, along with six troopers and police. Some 125 miners were arrested and many others badly wounded. The field is Prussian blue measuring 260 cm × 400 cm (2:3.08 ratio) and made from fine woollen fabric. The horizontal cross is 37 cm wide and the vertical cross 36 cm wide. The central star is slightly larger (8.5%) than the others being 65 cm tall from point to point and the other stars 60 cm. The white stars are made from fine cotton lawn and the off-white cross from cotton twill. It is listed as an object of significance on the Victorian Heritage Register and was designated as a Victorian icon by the National Trust in 2006.
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
Link from a Wikipage to an external page
extraction datetime
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Sep 1 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2020 OpenLink Software