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An Entity of Type : yago:WarsOfItalianIndependence, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
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The First Italian War of Independence (Italian: Prima guerra d'indipendenza italiana) was part of the Italian unification or Risorgimento. It was fought by the Kingdom of Sardinia (Piedmont) and Italian volunteers against the Austrian Empire and other conservative states from 23 March 1848 to 22 August 1849 in the Italian peninsula. The conflict was preceded by the outbreak of the Sicilian revolution of 1848 against the House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. It was precipitated by riots in the cities of Milan (Five Days) and Venice, which rebelled against Austria and established their own governments.

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  • First Italian War of Independence
  • First Italian War of Independence (war of the people)
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  • The First Italian War of Independence (Italian: Prima guerra d'indipendenza italiana) was part of the Italian unification or Risorgimento. It was fought by the Kingdom of Sardinia (Piedmont) and Italian volunteers against the Austrian Empire and other conservative states from 23 March 1848 to 22 August 1849 in the Italian peninsula. The conflict was preceded by the outbreak of the Sicilian revolution of 1848 against the House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. It was precipitated by riots in the cities of Milan (Five Days) and Venice, which rebelled against Austria and established their own governments.
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  • First Italian War of Independence
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has abstract
  • The First Italian War of Independence (Italian: Prima guerra d'indipendenza italiana) was part of the Italian unification or Risorgimento. It was fought by the Kingdom of Sardinia (Piedmont) and Italian volunteers against the Austrian Empire and other conservative states from 23 March 1848 to 22 August 1849 in the Italian peninsula. The conflict was preceded by the outbreak of the Sicilian revolution of 1848 against the House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. It was precipitated by riots in the cities of Milan (Five Days) and Venice, which rebelled against Austria and established their own governments. The part of the conflict which was fought by King Charles Albert against Austria in northern Italy was a Royal war and consisted of two campaigns. In both campaigns, the Kingdom of Sardinia attacked the Austrian Empire and after initial victories was decisively defeated, losing the war as a result. The decisive events of the first and second campaigns were the battles at Custoza and Novara, respectively. At the beginning of the royal war, the Kingdom of Sardinia was supported by the Papal States and the Kingdom of Two Sicilies, which then withdrew, having barely participated in the fighting at all. However, volunteers from the Papal and Neapolitan armies joined the other Italian volunteers and fought against Austria. Alongside the royal war, revolutionary movements took place in various Italian states (Papal States, Tuscany, etc.), part of the Revolutions of 1848 in the Italian states, which could not be reconciled with the Liberal ideals of Piedmont. Historiography treats these revolutions, as well as the Sicilian revolution of 23 March 1848, as a popular war, which also failed, ending in the restoration of traditional institutions and many rebels forced into exile. In the popular war with the internal revolutionaries, the Kingdom of Two Sicilies and the Papal States found themselves on the side opposite to the one they were on in the royal war, in which they initially supported Piedmont. The popular war first gave prominence to the military commander, Giuseppe Garibaldi, but he was defeated, as was King Charles Albert, who abdicated at the end of the war in favour of his eldest son, Victor Emmanuel.
  • The First Italian War of Independence (Italian: Prima guerra d'indipendenza italiana) was part of the Italian unification or Risorgimento. It was fought by the Kingdom of Sardinia (Piedmont) and Italian volunteers against the Austrian Empire and other conservative states from 23 March 1848 to 22 August 1849 in the Italian peninsula. The conflict was preceded by the outbreak of the Sicilian revolution of 1848 against the House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. It was precipitated by riots in the cities of Milan (Five Days) and Venice, which rebelled against Austria and established their own governments. The part of the conflict which was fought by King Charles Albert against Austria in northern Italy was a Royal war and consisted of two campaigns. In both campaigns, the Kingdom of Sardinia attacked the Austrian Empire and after initial victories were decisively defeated, losing the war as a result. The decisive events of the first and second campaigns were the battles at Custoza and Novara, respectively. At the beginning of the royal war, the Kingdom of Sardinia was supported by the Papal States and the Kingdom of Two Sicilies, which then withdrew, having barely participated in the fighting at all. However, volunteers from the Papal and Neapolitan armies joined the other Italian volunteers and fought against Austria. Alongside the royal war, revolutionary movements took place in various Italian states (Papal States, Tuscany, etc.), part of the Revolutions of 1848 in the Italian states, which could not be reconciled with the Liberal ideals of Piedmont. Historiography treats these revolutions, as well as the Sicilian revolution of 23 March 1848, as a popular war, which also failed, ending in the restoration of traditional institutions and many rebels forced into exile. In the popular war with the internal revolutionaries, the Kingdom of Two Sicilies and the Papal States found themselves on the side opposite to the one they were on in the royal war, in which they initially supported Piedmont. The popular war first gave prominence to the military commander, Giuseppe Garibaldi, but he was defeated, as was King Charles Albert, who abdicated at the end of the war in favour of his eldest son, Victor Emmanuel.
causalties
  • **10,000 captured
  • **5,000 wounded
  • **Unknown disease deaths
  • *1848: Unknown
  • *1849: 17,400+
  • **2,400 killed
combatant
  • *
  • France
  • border|22px
  • Supported by:
  • 22px|borderRoman Republic
  • 22px|border
  • 22px|borderAustrian Empire
  • 22px|borderKingdom of the Two Sicilies
  • 22px|borderPapal State
  • border|22pxGrand Duchy of Tuscany
  • border|22pxRepublic of San Marco
  • Tuscan Republic
  • border|22pxItalian volunteers
commander
date
Relates an entity ...ch it is located.
result
  • Austrian victory
  • Restoration of the monarchies and defeat of the revolutionaries
  • France defeats the Roman Republic
  • French Victory over Roman Republic
  • French Victory over Roman Republic, Papal rule restored over Rome
  • *Austrian victory
  • *French victory over Roman Republic, Papal rule restored over Rome
  • *French victory over Roman Republic
  • *Papal rule restored in Rome
strength
  • *
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