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In rare cases, baseball games are forfeited, usually when a team is no longer able to play. In the event of forfeiture, the score is recorded as 9–0, as stated in rule 2.00 of the Major League Baseball Rules Book. The 9–0 score equates to the number of innings in a regulation game. Actual game statistics are recorded as they stand at the time of the forfeit; the game is recorded as a loss in the standings for the forfeiting team and a win for the other team, even if the forfeiting team is ahead at that point.

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  • In rare cases, baseball games are forfeited, usually when a team is no longer able to play. In the event of forfeiture, the score is recorded as 9–0, as stated in rule 2.00 of the Major League Baseball Rules Book. The 9–0 score equates to the number of innings in a regulation game. Actual game statistics are recorded as they stand at the time of the forfeit; the game is recorded as a loss in the standings for the forfeiting team and a win for the other team, even if the forfeiting team is ahead at that point.
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  • Forfeit (baseball)
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  • In rare cases, baseball games are forfeited, usually when a team is no longer able to play. In the event of forfeiture, the score is recorded as 9–0, as stated in rule 2.00 of the Major League Baseball Rules Book. The 9–0 score equates to the number of innings in a regulation game. Actual game statistics are recorded as they stand at the time of the forfeit; the game is recorded as a loss in the standings for the forfeiting team and a win for the other team, even if the forfeiting team is ahead at that point. Although not uncommon in baseball's early days, forfeits are now rare. There have been only five forfeits in Major League Baseball since 1954; the last forfeit was in 1995, and prior to that, 1979. Since 1914, there has only been one incident where a team deliberately made a decision to forfeit a game, by the 1977 Baltimore Orioles. Sports with seven-inning games, such as high school baseball or softball, generally award a rule-based score of 7–0. The same is true for Little League Baseball, per Rule 2.00, under the definition of "Forfeit", there is one run allocated per inning, so for Minors and Majors divisions, that would be score of 6–0, and for Intermediate and above divisions, that would be a score of 7–0. In college baseball, the NCAA has the authority to retroactively forfeit games if the winning team is found to have violated NCAA rules. This can also happen for Little League World Series games, and occurred following the 1992 and 2014 events.
  • In rare cases, baseball games are forfeited, usually when a team is no longer able to play. In the event of forfeiture, the score is recorded as 9–0, as stated in rule 2.00 of the Major League Baseball Rules Book. The 9–0 score equates to the number of innings in a regulation game. Actual game statistics are recorded as they stand at the time of the forfeit; the game is recorded as a loss in the standings for the forfeiting team and a win for the other team, even if the forfeiting team is ahead at that point. Although not uncommon in baseball's early days, forfeits are now rare. There have been only five forfeits in Major League Baseball since 1954; the last forfeit was in 1995, and prior to that, 1979. Since 1914, there has only been one incident where a team deliberately made a decision to forfeit a game, by the 1977 Baltimore Orioles. Sports with seven-inning games, such as high school baseball or softball, generally award a rule-based score of 7–0. The same is true for Little League Baseball, per Rule 2.00, under the definition of "Forfeit", there is one run allocated per inning, so for Minors and Majors divisions, that would be score of 6–0, and for Intermediate and above divisions, that would be a score of 7–0. In college baseball, the NCAA has the authority to retroactively forfeit games if the winning team is found to have violated NCAA rules, although it should be noted that this is a general NCAA rule and not one exclusive to baseball. Retroactive forfeiture can also happen for Little League World Series games, and occurred following the 1992 and 2014 events.
  • In rare cases, baseball games are forfeited, usually when a team is no longer able to play. In the event of forfeiture, the score is recorded as 9–0, as stated in rule 2.00 of the Major League Baseball Rules Book. The 9–0 score equates to the number of innings in a regulation game. Actual game statistics are recorded as they stand at the time of the forfeit; the game is recorded as a loss in the standings for the forfeiting team and a win for the other team, even if the forfeiting team is ahead at that point. Although not uncommon in baseball's early days, forfeits are now rare. There have been only five forfeits in Major League Baseball since 1954; the last forfeit was in 1995, and prior to that, 1979. Since 1914, there has only been one incident where a team deliberately made a decision to forfeit a game, by the 1977 Baltimore Orioles. Sports with seven-inning games, such as high school baseball or softball, generally award a rule-based score of 7–0. The same is true for Little League Baseball, per Rule 2.00, under the definition of "Forfeit", there is one run allocated per inning, so for Minors and Majors divisions, that would be score of 6–0, and for Intermediate and above divisions, that would be a score of 7–0. In college baseball, the NCAA has the authority to retroactively forfeit games if the winning team is found to have violated NCAA rules, however it should be noted that this is a general NCAA rule and not one exclusive to baseball. Regardless of the sport, in the NCAA games are usually forfeited retroactively as a consequence of recruiting violations, if players and/or teams are caught violating the NCAA's strict rules regarding amateurism and/or if (a) player(s) are otherwise found to have been ineligible to play for some reason. Retroactive forfeiture can also happen for Little League World Series games, and occurred following the 1992 and 2014 events.
  • In rare cases, baseball games are forfeited, usually when a team is no longer able to play. In the event of forfeiture, the score is recorded as 9–0, as stated in rule 2.00 of the Major League Baseball Rules Book. The 9–0 score equates to the number of innings in a regulation game. Actual game statistics are recorded as they stand at the time of the forfeit; the game is recorded as a loss in the standings for the forfeiting team and a win for the other team, even if the forfeiting team is ahead at that point. Although not uncommon in baseball's early days, forfeits are now rare. There have been only five forfeits in Major League Baseball since 1954; the last forfeit was in 1995, and prior to that, 1979. Since 1914, there has only been one incident where a team deliberately made a decision to forfeit a game, by the 1977 Baltimore Orioles. Sports with seven-inning games, such as high school baseball or softball, generally award a rule-based score of 7–0. The same is true for Little League Baseball, per Rule 2.00, under the definition of "Forfeit", there is one run allocated per inning, so for Minors and Majors divisions, that would be score of 6–0, and for Intermediate and above divisions, that would be a score of 7–0. In college baseball, the NCAA has the authority to retroactively forfeit games if the winning team is found to have violated NCAA rules, however this is a general NCAA rule and not one exclusive to baseball. Regardless of the sport, in the NCAA games are usually forfeited retroactively as a consequence of recruiting violations, if players and/or teams are caught violating the NCAA's strict rules regarding amateurism and/or if (a) player(s) are otherwise found to have been ineligible to play for some reason. Retroactive forfeiture can also happen for Little League World Series games, and occurred following the 1992 and 2014 events.
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