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Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAT (Counter-Acoustic Torpedo). It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.

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  • Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAT (Counter-Acoustic Torpedo). It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.
  • Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAAT ( Canadian Anti-Acoustic Torpedo) device. It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.
  • Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAAT (Canadian Anti-Acoustic Torpedo) device. It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.
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  • Foxer
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  • Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAT (Counter-Acoustic Torpedo). It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. The device consisted of one or two noise-making devices towed several hundred metres astern of the ship. The noise makers mechanically generated a far more louder cavitation noises than the ships propellers. This noise distracted the acoustic torpedoes away from the rear of the ship into a circling pattern around the noise maker until the torpedo ran out of fuel. The downside of the Foxer was that it also rendered the own ship's ASDIC ineffective and concealed any other U-boat nearby that could home in on the convoy. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.
  • Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAAT ( Canadian Anti-Acoustic Torpedo) device. It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. The device consisted of one or two noise-making devices towed several hundred metres astern of the ship. The noise makers mechanically generated a far louder cavitation noise than the ships propellers. This noise distracted the acoustic torpedoes away from the rear of the ship into a circling pattern around the noise maker until the torpedo ran out of fuel. The downside of the Foxer was that it also rendered the own ship's ASDIC ineffective and concealed any other U-boat nearby that could home in on the convoy. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.
  • Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAAT (Canadian Anti-Acoustic Torpedo) device. It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. The device consisted of one or two noise-making devices towed several hundred metres astern of the ship. The noise makers mechanically generated a far louder cavitation noise than the ships propellers. This noise distracted the acoustic torpedoes away from the rear of the ship into a circling pattern around the noise maker until the torpedo ran out of fuel. The downside of the Foxer was that it also rendered the own ship's ASDIC ineffective and concealed any other U-boat nearby that could home in on the convoy. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.
  • Foxer was the code name for a British built acoustic decoy used to confuse German acoustic homing torpedoes like the G7 torpedo during the Second World War. A US version codenamed FXR was deployed at the end of September 1943 on all transatlantic escort vessels. A Canadian version was also built called the CAAT (Canadian Anti-Acoustic Torpedo) device. It was replaced in US service by the Fanfare noisemaker. The device consisted of one or two noise-making devices towed several hundred metres astern of the ship. The noise makers mechanically generated a far louder cavitation noise than the ships propellers. This noise distracted the acoustic torpedoes away from the rear of the ship into a circling pattern around the noise maker until the torpedo ran out of fuel. The downside of the Foxer was that it also rendered the own ship's ASDIC ineffective and concealed any other U-boat nearby that could approach the convoy. Nevertheless, the FXR countermeasure proved to be highly effective in decoying German acoustic torpedoes. Of the c. 700 fired G7es torpedoes about only 77 had found their aim.
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