About: Frithjof Schuon     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : wikidata:Q24229398, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FFrithjof_Schuon

Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]) (18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
thumbnail
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Frithjof Schuon
rdfs:comment
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]) (18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June 1907 – 5 May 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June 1907 – 5 May 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion. His religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter.
rdfs:label
  • Frithjof Schuon
has abstract
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]) (18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. A critic of doctrine and morality appeared in 2018: Maude Murray, a witness to the same events mentioned by Koslow, in criticisms below, which are widespread.and the source of much of his information over 15 years earlier. She was alledgedly the third of the four wives of Frithjof Schuon for 20 years, and a very close disciple. She discusses both major doctrinal errors and the disregard of moral precepts. Her works are online and in a forthcoming book, Third Wife of a Muslim Shaykh: My Lifelong Search for Truth, to be published by Beacon Books in the U.K. Maude Murray has re-produced several letters, by René Guénon, who approved of Schuon in 1946, but rejected both his doctrines and his practices by 1950. There were many witnesses to various immoral events. Their signed, legal affidavits are in various articles online. There are also handwritten letters, by several disciples. One, by the only legal wife, Catherine Schuon, claims that there were irrefutable signs from heaven affirming the authenticity of two of the alledged other marriages. Both of the two women concerned (the fourth not yet having arrived) were both legally and Islamically married to other husbands. According to Maude Murray, many close disciples have witnessed "Indian Days" - proving that the "official" descriptions of events were distorted. The doctrines of Frithjof Schuon are innovations:. For the first time, he founded an esoteric spiritual order (a Sufi Tariqah) on the basis of his version of metaphysical concepts, and not upon the authority of God in revelation. That was the fundamental objection of René Guénon and other scholars.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. A critic of doctrine and morality appeared in 2018: Maude Murray, a witness to the same events mentioned by Koslow, in criticisms below, which are widespread. The source of much of his information over 15 years earlier, she was also alledgedly the third of the four wives of Frithjof Schuon for 20 years, and a very close disciple. She discusses both major doctrinal errors and the disregard of moral precepts. Her works are online and in a forthcoming book, Third Wife of a Muslim Shaykh: My Lifelong Search for Truth, to be published by Beacon Books in the U.K. Maude Murray has re-produced several letters, by René Guénon, who approved of Schuon in 1946, but rejected both his doctrines and his practices by 1950. There were many witnesses to various immoral events. Their signed, legal affidavits are in various articles online. There are also handwritten letters, by several disciples. One, by the only legal wife, Catherine Schuon, claims that there were irrefutable signs from heaven affirming the authenticity of two of the alledged other marriages. Both of the two women concerned (the fourth not yet having arrived) were both legally and Islamically married to other husbands. According to Maude Murray, many close disciples have witnessed "Indian Days" - proving that the "official" descriptions of those events and others, were distorted. The doctrines of Frithjof Schuon are innovations: For the first time, he founded an esoteric spiritual order (a Sufi Tariqah) on the basis of his version of metaphysical concepts, and not upon the authority of God in revelation. That was the fundamental objection of René Guénon and of other scholars.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. A critic of doctrine and morality appeared in 2018: Maude Murray, a witness to the same events mentioned by Koslow, in criticisms below, which are widespread. The source of much of his information over 15 years earlier, she was also alledgedly the third of the four wives of Frithjof Schuon for 20 years, and a very close disciple. She discusses both major doctrinal errors and the disregard of moral precepts. Her works are online and in a forthcoming book, Third Wife of a Muslim Shaykh: My Lifelong Search for Truth, to be published by Beacon Books in the U.K. Maude Murray has re-produced several letters, by René Guénon, who approved of Schuon in 1946, but rejected both his doctrines and his practices by 1950. There were many witnesses to various immoral events. Their signed, legal affidavits are in various articles online. There are also handwritten letters, by several disciples. One, by the only legal wife, Catherine Schuon, claims that there were irrefutable signs from heaven affirming the authenticity of two of the alledged other marriages. Both of the two women concerned (the fourth not yet having arrived) were legally and Islamically married to other husbands. According to Maude Murray, many close disciples have witnessed "Indian Days" - proving that the "official" descriptions of those events and others, were distorted. The doctrines of Frithjof Schuon are innovations: For the first time, he founded an esoteric spiritual order (a Sufi Tariqah) on the basis of his version of metaphysical concepts, and not upon the authority of God in revelation. That was the fundamental objection of René Guénon and of other scholars.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. A critic of his doctrine and morality appeared in 2018: Maude Murray, a witness to the same events mentioned by Koslow, in criticisms below, which are widespread. The source of much of Koslow's information over 15 years earlier, she was also alledgedly the third of the four wives of Frithjof Schuon for 20 years, and a very close disciple. She discusses both major doctrinal errors and the disregard of moral precepts. Her works are online and in a forthcoming book, Third Wife of a Muslim Shaykh: My Lifelong Search for Truth, to be published by Beacon Books in the U.K. Maude Murray has also re-produced several letters, by René Guénon, who approved of Schuon in 1946, but rejected both his doctrines and his practices by 1950. There were many witnesses to various immoral events. Their signed, legal affidavits are in various articles online. There are also handwritten letters, by several disciples. One, by the only legal wife, Catherine Schuon, claims that there were irrefutable signs from heaven affirming the authenticity of two of the alledged other marriages. Both of the two women concerned (the fourth not yet having arrived) were legally and Islamically married to other husbands. According to Maude Murray, many disappointed disciples (who left the "Tariqah") witnessed "Indian Days" and testified - proving that the "official" descriptions of those events and others, were distorted. The doctrines of Frithjof Schuon are innovations: For the first time, he founded an esoteric spiritual order (a Sufi Tariqah) on the basis of his version of metaphysical concepts, and not upon the authority of God in revelation. That was the fundamental objection of René Guénon and of other scholars.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. A critic of his doctrine and morality appeared in 2018: Maude Murray, a witness to the same events mentioned by Koslow, in criticisms below, which are widespread. The source of much of Koslow's information over 15 years earlier, she was also alledgedly the third of the four wives of Frithjof Schuon for 20 years, and a very close disciple. She discusses both major doctrinal errors and the disregard of moral precepts. Her works are online and in a forthcoming book, Third Wife of a Muslim Shaykh: My Lifelong Search for Truth, to be published by Beacon Books in the U.K. Maude Murray has also re-produced several letters, by René Guénon, who approved of Schuon in 1946, but rejected both his doctrines and his practices by 1950. There were many witnesses to various immoral events. Their signed, legal affidavits are in various articles online. There are also handwritten letters, by several disciples. One, by the only legal wife, Catherine Ann Schuon, claims that there were irrefutable signs from heaven affirming the authenticity of two of the alledged other marriages. Both of the two women concerned (the fourth not yet having arrived) were legally and Islamically married to other husbands. According to Maude Murray, many disappointed disciples (who left the "Tariqah") witnessed "Indian Days" and testified - proving that the "official" descriptions of those events and others, were distorted. The doctrines of Frithjof Schuon are innovations: For the first time, he founded an esoteric spiritual order (a Sufi Tariqah) on the basis of his version of metaphysical concepts, and not upon the authority of God in revelation. That was the fundamental objection of René Guénon and of other scholars. There are quotations in Maude Murray's writings from the master of Frithjof Schuon, the Shaykh Ahmad Al-'Alawi; from Junayd; Ibn Arabi; Abdul Qadir Al-Jilani; the Emir Abdul Qadir; René Guénon, Ibn Ajiba and others - all refuting the doctrines and practices of Frithjof Schuon. The two best known scholars of Ibn Arabi, William C. Chittick and Gregory A. Lipton, are also quoted and compared. Among scholars, the most notable refutations of Frithjof Schuon, are in the works of Gregory A. Lipton. His book, Rethinking Ibn Arabi, is completed by an article refuting Schuon's concepts regarding castes and races.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. A critic of his doctrine and morality appeared in 2018: Maude Murray, a witness to the same events mentioned by Koslow, in criticisms below, which are widespread. The source of much of Koslow's information over 15 years earlier, she was also alledgedly the third of the four wives of Frithjof Schuon for 20 years, and a very close disciple. She discusses both major doctrinal errors and the disregard of moral precepts. Her works are online and in a forthcoming book, Third Wife of a Muslim Shaykh: My Lifelong Search for Truth, to be published by Beacon Books in the U.K. Maude Murray has also re-produced several letters, by René Guénon, who approved of Schuon in 1946, but rejected both his doctrines and his practices by 1950. There were many witnesses to various immoral events. Their signed, legal affidavits are in various articles online. There are also handwritten letters, by several disciples. One, by the only legal wife, Catherine Ann Schuon, claims that there were irrefutable signs from heaven affirming the authenticity of two of the alledged other marriages. Both of the two women concerned (the fourth not yet having arrived) were legally and Islamically married to other husbands. According to Maude Murray, many disappointed disciples (who left the "Tariqah") witnessed "Indian Days" and testified - proving that the "official" descriptions of those events and others, were distorted. The doctrines of Frithjof Schuon are innovations: For the first time, he founded an esoteric spiritual order (a Sufi Tariqah) on the basis of his version of metaphysical concepts, and not upon the authority of God in revelation. That was the fundamental objection of René Guénon and of other scholars. There are quotations in Maude Murray's writings from the master of Frithjof Schuon, the Shaykh Ahmad Al-'Alawi; from Mansur Al-Hallaj; Junayd; Ibn Arabi; Abdul Qadir Al-Jilani; the Emir Abdul Qadir; René Guénon, Ibn Ajiba and others - all refuting the doctrines and practices of Frithjof Schuon. The two best known scholars of Ibn Arabi, William C. Chittick and Gregory A. Lipton, are also quoted and compared. Among scholars, the most notable refutations of Frithjof Schuon, are in the works of Gregory A. Lipton. His book, Rethinking Ibn Arabi, is completed by an article refuting Schuon's concepts regarding castes and races.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. For refutations of Frithjof Schuon's doctrines, see Rethinking Ibn Arabi, by Gregory A. Lipton, who also, through scholarship, describes the character of Frithjof Schuon. An article by Lipton, caled Aryanism and the Schuonian discourse...covers Schuon's errors as concern races. René Guénon, who was favorable to Schuon in 1946, realized that he was wrong by 1950. He wrote a series of letters, which are posted on the English and French Facebook pages devoted to René Guénon. In a document called Dossier Schuon, Appendix, Annexes II, (Volume 4 ), Mark Koslow posts photographs of Schuon and his wives, naked, of a "icon" of Frithjof Schuon naked and of many signed, legal documents, written by people who witness blatantly immoral behavior by Frithjof Schuon.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June, 1907 – 5 May, 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God. For refutations of Frithjof Schuon's doctrines, see Rethinking Ibn Arabi, by Gregory A. Lipton, who also, through scholarship, describes the character of Frithjof Schuon. An article by Lipton, caled Aryanism and the Schuonian discourse...covers Schuon's errors as concern races. René Guénon, who was favorable to Schuon in 1946, realized that he was wrong by 1950. He wrote a series of letters, which are posted on the English and French Facebook pages devoted to René Guénon. In a document called Dossier Schuon, Appendix, Annexes II, (Volume 4 ), Mark Koslow posts photographs of Schuon and his wives, naked, of a "icon" of Frithjof Schuon naked and of many signed, legal documents, written by people who witnessed blatantly immoral behavior by Frithjof Schuon.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June 1907 – 5 May 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion whose religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June 1907 – 5 May 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion. His religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe and to whom our souls would return after death. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God.
  • Frithjof Schuon (; German: [ˈfʀiːtˌjoːf ˈʃuː.ɔn]; 18 June 1907 – 5 May 1998), also known as ʿĪsā Nūr ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad (Arabic: عيسیٰ نور الـدّين أحمد‎) after his conversion to Islam, was an author of German ancestry born in Basel, Switzerland. Schuon is widely recognized as one of the most influential scholars and teachers within the sphere of comparative religion. His religious worldview was influenced by his study of the Hindu philosophy of Advaita Vedanta and Islamic Sufism. He authored numerous books on religion and spirituality as well as being a poet and a painter. In his prose and poetic writings, Schuon focuses on metaphysical doctrine and spiritual method. He is considered one of the main representatives and exponents of the religio perennis (perennial religion) and one of the chief representatives of the Traditionalist School. In his writings, Schuon expresses his faith in an absolute principle, God, who governs the universe. For Schuon, the great revelations are the link between this absolute principle—God—and humankind. He wrote the main bulk of his work in French. In the later years of his life, Schuon composed some volumes of poetry in his mother tongue, German. His articles in French were collected in about 20 titles in French which were later translated into English as well as many other languages. The main subjects of his prose and poetic compositions are spirituality and various essential realms of the human life coming from God and returning to God.
birth date
birth place
birth year
death date
death place
death year
era
influenced
influenced by
main interest
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Sep 1 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2020 OpenLink Software