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At the beginning of the 1990s the Royal Navy was a force designed for the Cold War. The main purpose of its fleet, based around three small aircraft carriers and a force of anti-submarine frigates and destroyers, was to search for, and destroy if required, Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic. The 1982 Falklands War also demonstrated a requirement for the Royal Navy to maintain a global reach and expeditionary capability. As of October 2019, the following are under construction or being laid down;

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  • At the beginning of the 1990s the Royal Navy was a force designed for the Cold War. The main purpose of its fleet, based around three small aircraft carriers and a force of anti-submarine frigates and destroyers, was to search for, and destroy if required, Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic. The 1982 Falklands War also demonstrated a requirement for the Royal Navy to maintain a global reach and expeditionary capability. As of October 2019, the following are under construction or being laid down;
  • Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and end of the Cold War, the Royal Navy's mission transitioned from a anti-submarine focused force to a wider range of objectives around the world, while experiencing a gradual reduction in the size of its surface and submarine fleets. As a result, the Navy began a series of projects to improve its fleet, with a view to providing enhanced capabilities. This led to the replacement of smaller and more numerous units with fewer, but larger, units. For example the replacement of twelve Type 42 destroyers with six Type 45 destroyers and the replacement of the three 20,000-tonne Invincible-class aircraft carriers with two 65,000-tonne Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers.
  • Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and end of the Cold War, the Royal Navy's mission transitioned from an anti-submarine focused force to a wider range of objectives around the world, while experiencing a gradual reduction in the size of its surface and submarine fleets. As a result, the Navy began a series of projects to improve its fleet, with a view to providing enhanced capabilities. This led to the replacement of smaller and more numerous units with fewer, but larger, units. For example the replacement of twelve Type 42 destroyers with six Type 45 destroyers and the replacement of the three 20,000-tonne Invincible-class aircraft carriers with two 65,000-tonne Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers.
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  • Future of the Royal Navy
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  • At the beginning of the 1990s the Royal Navy was a force designed for the Cold War. The main purpose of its fleet, based around three small aircraft carriers and a force of anti-submarine frigates and destroyers, was to search for, and destroy if required, Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic. The 1982 Falklands War also demonstrated a requirement for the Royal Navy to maintain a global reach and expeditionary capability. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Royal Navy has been used to meet a wider range of objectives around the world, while experiencing a gradual reduction in the size of its surface and submarine fleets. Fixed-wing carrier operations ceased in 2010 with the retirement of the last Harrier GR7/GR9 aircraft. This capability has since been restored by the addition of the F-35 Joint Combat Aircraft and the first Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier which became operational in 2019. Cuts have also seen the sale of three Type 23 frigates in 2005 and 2006, and the early decommissioning of four Type 22 frigates in 2010 and 2011. Over the course of the 1990s and the 2000s, the Navy began a series of projects to improve its fleet, with a view to providing enhanced capabilities, although many programmes were reduced in scale. This led to the replacement of smaller and more numerous units with fewer, but larger, units. The main examples of this are the replacement of twelve Type 42 destroyers with six Type 45 destroyers and the replacement of the three 20,000-tonne Invincible-class aircraft carriers with two 65,000-tonne Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers. As of October 2019, the following are under construction or being laid down; * the final three of seven Astute-class submarines, * the first of four Dreadnought-class ballistic missile submarines, * the first two of eight Type 26 frigates and * the ninth of nine River-class ocean-going patrol vessels. In addition, early design and preparation work has begun for a fleet of at least five Type 31 frigates. Parliament's National Audit Office (NAO) has described the Ministry of Defence's current equipment plan as "unaffordable". With respect to the 2019 to 2029 period, the NAO has noted that the Royal Navy has allocated no funding to replace certain key capabilities, specifically referencing the Royal Fleet Auxiliary hospital ship RFA Argus and the Royal Navy's mine countermeasures capability as examples. These issues are planned to be addressed in the pending integrated foreign policy, security, defence and international development review which had been anticipated in 2020 but, due to Covid-19, is likely to be deferred for at least a year.
  • At the beginning of the 1990s the Royal Navy was a force designed for the Cold War. The main purpose of its fleet, based around three small aircraft carriers and a force of anti-submarine frigates and destroyers, was to search for, and destroy if required, Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic. The 1982 Falklands War also demonstrated a requirement for the Royal Navy to maintain a global reach and expeditionary capability. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Royal Navy has been used to meet a wider range of objectives around the world, while experiencing a gradual reduction in the size of its surface and submarine fleets. Fixed-wing carrier operations ceased in 2010 with the retirement of the last Harrier GR7/GR9 aircraft. This capability has since been restored by the addition of the F-35 Joint Combat Aircraft and the first Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier which became operational in 2019. Cuts have also seen the sale of three Type 23 frigates in 2005 and 2006, and the early decommissioning of four Type 22 frigates in 2010 and 2011. Over the course of the 1990s and the 2000s, the Navy began a series of projects to improve its fleet, with a view to providing enhanced capabilities, although many programmes were reduced in scale. This led to the replacement of smaller and more numerous units with fewer, but larger, units. The main examples of this are the replacement of twelve Type 42 destroyers with six Type 45 destroyers and the replacement of the three 20,000-tonne Invincible-class aircraft carriers with two 65,000-tonne Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers. As of October 2019, the following are under construction or being laid down; * the final three of seven Astute-class submarines, * the first of four Dreadnought-class ballistic missile submarines, * the first two of eight Type 26 frigates and * the ninth of nine River-class ocean-going patrol vessels. In addition, early design and preparation work has begun for a fleet of at least five Type 31 frigates. Parliament's National Audit Office (NAO) has described the Ministry of Defence's current equipment plan as "unaffordable". With respect to the 2019 to 2029 period, the NAO has noted that the Royal Navy has allocated no funding to replace certain key capabilities, specifically referencing the Royal Fleet Auxiliary hospital ship RFA Argus and the Royal Navy's mine countermeasures capability as examples. These issues are planned to be addressed in the pending integrated foreign policy, security, defence and international development review which had been anticipated in 2020 but, due to Covid-19, is likely to be deferred for at least a year. With relevant equipment issues; no doubt; being subject to canteen discussion groups within the services (Code for early retirement].In a mad grasp for a rapidly depleted pot of funds to be distributed from department to department, let alone the armed services in general. As the BBC have often made the point, we can not afford the big ticket items; & now, especially, we can not afford the equipment that makes the platform "Big Ticket" work. We can; however; afford, a basic working service, of all branches, hopefully without the need for to much draw down in man power. Thus, no early compulsory retirement. It will, as the BBC, have often made the point; require the "British People" to understand that the government will not want the population-that has been; effectively, for their own good; "Put on house arrest", or "Imprisoned", in order to protect the national infrastructure; to be then expect them to pay for military equipment that we can not afford, or, use with any, reasonable explanation to the people paying for it; might be; a bit of a politician's lobby for the opposition. The two "Carrier's" once "paid off", will have to be sold, making way for a BBC style, working service fit for the UK post "Covid19". Trident, also, will be, and must be cancelled, no doubt with the USA, & NATO, understanding we are finally ending our, "East of Suez Policy", some 64 years, hence.
  • Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and end of the Cold War, the Royal Navy's mission transitioned from a anti-submarine focused force to a wider range of objectives around the world, while experiencing a gradual reduction in the size of its surface and submarine fleets. As a result, the Navy began a series of projects to improve its fleet, with a view to providing enhanced capabilities. This led to the replacement of smaller and more numerous units with fewer, but larger, units. For example the replacement of twelve Type 42 destroyers with six Type 45 destroyers and the replacement of the three 20,000-tonne Invincible-class aircraft carriers with two 65,000-tonne Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers. As of June 2020, the following are under construction or being laid down; the final three of seven Astute-class submarines; the first of four Dreadnought-class ballistic missile submarines, the first two of eight Type 26 frigates; the ninth of nine River-class ocean-going patrol vessels. In addition, early design and preparation work has begun for a fleet of at least five Type 31 frigates. The National Audit Office (NAO) has described the Ministry of Defence's current equipment plan as "unaffordable". With respect to the 2019 to 2029 period, the NAO has noted that the Royal Navy has allocated no funding to replace certain key capabilities, specifically referencing the Royal Fleet Auxiliary hospital ship RFA Argus and the Royal Navy's mine countermeasures capability as examples. These issues are planned to be addressed in the pending integrated foreign policy, security, defence and international development review which had been anticipated in 2020 but, due to Covid-19, is likely to be deferred for at least a year.
  • Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and end of the Cold War, the Royal Navy's mission transitioned from an anti-submarine focused force to a wider range of objectives around the world, while experiencing a gradual reduction in the size of its surface and submarine fleets. As a result, the Navy began a series of projects to improve its fleet, with a view to providing enhanced capabilities. This led to the replacement of smaller and more numerous units with fewer, but larger, units. For example the replacement of twelve Type 42 destroyers with six Type 45 destroyers and the replacement of the three 20,000-tonne Invincible-class aircraft carriers with two 65,000-tonne Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers. As of June 2020, the following are under construction or being laid down; the final three of seven Astute-class submarines; the first of four Dreadnought-class ballistic missile submarines, the first two of eight Type 26 frigates; the ninth of nine River-class ocean-going patrol vessels. In addition, early design and preparation work has begun for a fleet of at least five Type 31 frigates. The National Audit Office (NAO) has described the Ministry of Defence's current equipment plan as "unaffordable". With respect to the 2019 to 2029 period, the NAO has noted that the Royal Navy has allocated no funding to replace certain key capabilities, specifically referencing the Royal Fleet Auxiliary hospital ship RFA Argus and the Royal Navy's mine countermeasures capability as examples. These issues are planned to be addressed in the pending integrated foreign policy, security, defence and international development review which had been anticipated in 2020 but, due to Covid-19, is likely to be deferred for at least a year.
  • Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and end of the Cold War, the Royal Navy's mission transitioned from an anti-submarine focused force to a wider range of objectives around the world, while experiencing a gradual reduction in the size of its surface and submarine fleets. As a result, the Navy began a series of projects to improve its fleet, with a view to providing enhanced capabilities. This led to the replacement of smaller and more numerous units with fewer, but larger, units. For example the replacement of twelve Type 42 destroyers with six Type 45 destroyers and the replacement of the three 20,000-tonne Invincible-class aircraft carriers with two 65,000-tonne Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers. As of June 2020, the following are under construction or being laid down; the final three of seven Astute-class submarines; the first of four Dreadnought-class ballistic missile submarines, the first two of eight Type 26 frigates; the ninth of nine River-class ocean-going patrol vessels. In addition, early design and preparation work has begun for a fleet of at least five Type 31 frigates. The National Audit Office (NAO) has described the Ministry of Defence's current equipment plan as "unaffordable". With respect to the 2019 to 2029 period, the NAO has noted that the Royal Navy has allocated no funding to replace certain key capabilities, specifically referencing the Royal Fleet Auxiliary hospital ship RFA Argus and the Royal Navy's mine countermeasures capability as examples. These issues are planned to be addressed in the pending integrated foreign policy, security, defence and international development review which had been anticipated in 2020 but, due to Covid-19, is likely to be deferred for at least a year.
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