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(Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גבעה Giv'a; Hebrew: גבעת Giveath) is one of several place names appearing in several books of the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011. In another instance, Conder identifies the Palestinian village of Jab'a with the biblical town of Gibeah, mentioned in Joshua 15:57, although this later identification places Gibeah to the south of Jerusalem.

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  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גבעה Giv'a; Hebrew: גבעת Giveath) is one of several place names appearing in several books of the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011. In another instance, Conder identifies the Palestinian village of Jab'a with the biblical town of Gibeah, mentioned in Joshua 15:57, although this later identification places Gibeah to the south of Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of several places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011. In another instance, Conder identifies the Palestinian village of Jab'a with the biblical town of Gibeah, mentioned in Joshua 15:57, although this later identification places Gibeah to the south of Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of several places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of several places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011. Three locations are called Gibeah in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim. The location in Benjamin is best-known.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of three places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim respectively. The location in Benjamin is best-known, and generally identified with Tell el-Fūl in northern Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city) or Geba (city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of three places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim respectively. The location in Benjamin is best-known, and generally identified with Tell el-Fūl in northern Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city) or Geba (city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה‎ Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת‎ Giveath) is the name of three places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim respectively. The location in Benjamin is best-known, and generally identified with Tell el-Fūl in northern Jerusalem.
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  • Gibeah
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  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גבעה Giv'a; Hebrew: גבעת Giveath) is one of several place names appearing in several books of the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011. In another instance, Conder identifies the Palestinian village of Jab'a with the biblical town of Gibeah, mentioned in Joshua 15:57, although this later identification places Gibeah to the south of Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of several places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011. In another instance, Conder identifies the Palestinian village of Jab'a with the biblical town of Gibeah, mentioned in Joshua 15:57, although this later identification places Gibeah to the south of Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of several places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of several places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. In one instance, it is generally identified with Tell el-Fūl (Arabic for "mound of fava beans"), a hill in the northern reaches of modern Jerusalem, on the outskirts of the Pisgat Ze'ev and Shuafat neighborhoods. However, this identification was challenged by Israel Finkelstein in 2011. Three locations are called Gibeah in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim. The location in Benjamin is best-known.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of three places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim respectively. The location in Benjamin is best-known, and generally identified with Tell el-Fūl in northern Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city) or Geba (city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת Giveath) is the name of three places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim respectively. The location in Benjamin is best-known, and generally identified with Tell el-Fūl in northern Jerusalem.
  • (Not to be confused with Gibeon (ancient city) or Geba (city).) Gibeah (; Hebrew: גִּבְעָה‎ Giv'a; Hebrew: גִּבְעַת‎ Giveath) is the name of three places mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, in the tribes of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim respectively. The location in Benjamin is best-known, and generally identified with Tell el-Fūl in northern Jerusalem.
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