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Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is r

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  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is r
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. PBUH Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad PBUH). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad PBUH and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic Holly Prophet Hazrat Mohammad (S.A.W). Hadith have been called "the Backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of revealed to His Holly Messenger Hazrat Mohammadﷺ ). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Hazrat Mohammadﷺ and obey Hisﷺ judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the sublime Words, Actions, and the Silent approval of the Islamic Holly Prophet Hazrat Mohammad (S.A.W). Hadith have been called "the Backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of revealed to His Holly Messenger Hazrat Mohammadﷺ ). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Hazrat Mohammadﷺ and obey Hisﷺ judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the nu
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet . Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad sallalahu alehi wassalam ). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad sallalahu alehi wassalam and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad (through Sunnah). Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, hadith ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Although Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad through Sunnah. Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time,
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ Aṯhar Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: الأثر‎, Aṯhar literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). Wh
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ Aṯhar Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: الأثر‎, Aṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). W
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). Whi
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). Whi
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). Wh
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet . Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad [pbuh]). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). Wh
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what mainstream Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54,
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 2
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama.
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  • Hadith
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  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslim believe hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. PBUH Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad PBUH). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad PBUH and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's PBUH followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad PBUH. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad PBUH, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic Holly Prophet Hazrat Mohammad (S.A.W). Hadith have been called "the Backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of revealed to His Holly Messenger Hazrat Mohammadﷺ ). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Hazrat Mohammadﷺ and obey Hisﷺ judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Hazrat Mohammadﷺ's followersؓ immediately after Hisﷺ apparent death("apparent death" because Hazrat Mohammad S.A.W is Noor of Allah and is still alive in Hisﷺ's Holly Shrine) but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that a little Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Holly Prophet Mohammadﷺ. the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Hazrat Mohammadﷺ, but also those of Hisﷺ . In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the Sunnah, the Holly and Sublime Words and Actions of the Holly Prophetﷺ and Hisﷺ Holly Family the Ahl al-Bayt ( and the Holly Prophetﷺ's Beloved Daughterؓ , ) and Holly Prophet S.A.W Son in law .
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the sublime Words, Actions, and the Silent approval of the Islamic Holly Prophet Hazrat Mohammad (S.A.W). Hadith have been called "the Backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of revealed to His Holly Messenger Hazrat Mohammadﷺ ). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Hazrat Mohammadﷺ and obey Hisﷺ judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Hazrat Mohammadﷺ's followersؓ immediately after Hisﷺ apparent death("apparent death" because Hazrat Mohammad S.A.W is Noor of Allah and is still alive in Hisﷺ's Holly Shrine) but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that a little Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Holly Prophet Mohammadﷺ. the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Hazrat Mohammadﷺ, but also those of Hisﷺ . In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the Sunnah, the Holly and Sublime Words and Actions of the Holly Prophetﷺ and Hisﷺ Holly Family the Ahl al-Bayt ( and the Holly Prophetﷺ's Beloved Daughterؓ , ) and Holly Prophet S.A.W Son in law .
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet . Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad sallalahu alehi wassalam ). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad sallalahu alehi wassalam and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad sallalahu alehi wassalam's followers immediately after his wiladat but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad sallalahu alehi wassalam. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad sallalahu alehi wassalam, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet sallalahu alehi wassalam and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet sallalahu alehi wassalam's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad (through Sunnah). Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time, evidently saw and followed and passed on to the next generations, without any doubt. (For example, the method of offering 5 daily prayers). However, some people believe that: Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad (through Sunnah). Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time, evidently saw and followed and passed on to the next generations, without any doubt. (For example, the method of offering 5 daily prayers). However, some people believe that: Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran.Some believe that Jews and Munafiqun, on seeing the unprecedented success of the followers of Prophet Muhammad of the Islamic Golden Age, who had only Quran and Sunnah to follow, and no hadith, planned to avenge the Muslims psychologically by gradually introducing and propagating the concept of hadith as part of their religion, since they could no longer oppose them militarily. And despite the Quran warning the Muslims to stay alert and do not be deaf and blind on judging what to follow, the majority of Muslims fell prey to the enemy's attack. (Al-Quran, Surah Bani-Israel: 17:36 "(O man), follow not that whereof thou hast no knowledge. Lo! the hearing and the sight and the heart - of each of these it will be asked." Translation by Muhammad Marmaduke Pickthall)Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad (through Sunnah). Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time, evidently saw and followed and passed on to the next generations, without any doubt. (For example, the method of offering 5 daily prayers). However, some people believe that: Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Some believe that Jews and Munafiqun, on seeing the unprecedented success of the followers of Prophet Muhammad of the Islamic Golden Age, who had only Quran and Sunnah to follow, and no hadith, planned to avenge the Muslims psychologically by gradually over the years, introducing and propagating the concept of hadith as part of their religion, since they could no longer oppose them militarily. And despite the Quran warning the Muslims to stay alert and do not be deaf and blind on judging what to follow, the majority of Muslims fell prey to the enemy's attack. (Al-Quran, Surah Bani-Israel: 17:36 "(O man), follow not that whereof thou hast no knowledge. Lo! the hearing and the sight and the heart - of each of these it will be asked." Translation by Muhammad Marmaduke Pickthall)Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad (through Sunnah). Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time, evidently saw and followed and passed on to the next generations, without any doubt. (For example, the method of offering 5 daily prayers). However, some people believe that: Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Some believe that Jews and Munafiqun, on seeing the unprecedented success of the followers of Prophet Muhammad of the Islamic Golden Age, who had only Quran and Sunnah to follow, and no hadith, planned to avenge the Muslims psychologically by gradually over the years, introducing and propagating the concept of hadith as part of their religion, since they could no longer oppose them militarily. And despite the Quran warning the Muslims to stay alert and do not be deaf and blind on judging what to follow, the majority of Muslims fell prey to the enemy's attack. (Al-Quran, Surah Bani-Israel: 17:36 "(O man), follow not that whereof thou hast no knowledge. Lo! the hearing and the sight and the heart - of each of these it will be asked." Translation by Muhammad Marmaduke Pickthall). Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, hadith ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Although Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad through Sunnah. Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time, evidently saw and followed and passed on to the next generations, without any doubt. (For example, the method of offering 5 daily prayers). However, some people believe that: Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad (through Sunnah). Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time, evidently saw and followed and passed on to the next generations, without any doubt. (For example, the method of offering 5 daily prayers). Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad by some (and not all of them) of his assumed companions. However, according to some people, Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Quran enjoins Muslims to follow Muhammad (through Sunnah). Sunnah is separate from Hadith (the verbally transmitted record of the teachings, deeds and sayings of the Prophet by some of his assumed companions) and Sunnah is what all the Muslims of Prophet Muhammad's time, evidently saw and followed and passed on to the next generations, without any doubt. (For example, the method of offering 5 daily prayers). Some believe that Jews and Munafiqun, on seeing the unprecedented success of the followers of Prophet Muhammad of the Islamic Golden Age, who had only Quran and Sunnah to follow, and no hadith, planned to avenge the Muslims psychologically by gradually over the years, introducing and propagating the concept of hadith as part of their religion, since they could no longer oppose them militarily. And despite the Quran warning the Muslims to stay alert and do not be deaf and blind on judging what to follow, the majority of Muslims fell prey to the enemy's attack. (Al-Quran, Surah Bani-Israel: 17:36 "(O man), follow not that whereof thou hast no knowledge. Lo! the hearing and the sight and the heart - of each of these it will be asked." Translation by Muhammad Marmaduke Pickthall). Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th & 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Fabrication of Hadiths: The fabrication of Hadith of Rasool Allah SAW was started in the mid of first Century of Hijra . Iraq, Yemen, Basra, Syria , Khurasaan etc were the centers of Hadith Fabrication. In second Century of Hijra,the fabrication of hadith was on its peak .In Iraq,Basra,Baghdad,Syria,Khurasaan,Yemen etc there were more than 6500(six thousand five hundred) Narrators busy day and night in fabrication of hadiths since the mid of the second century of hijra. In mosques,Streets,Markets, parks these fabricators and Liars gathered the people with Loud Voices of Qa'la Qa'la Rasool Allah and than started the recitation of fabricated Hadiths. At the end of second century hijra these Liars and Fraud Muhadiths made more than one and a half million fabricated hadiths. Dr.Abu Hayyan Aadil Sai'd told that all Hadiths of كتاب الفتن in Bukhari and Muslim are fake and fabricated. Some of the Chief fabricators named Said bin Jubyr,Ata bin Abi Rabah ,Shuba bin Al Hajaj,Abdul Razzaq bin Haman, Ibn e Jureij, Ibn e Shahab Zuhri,Ata bin Abi Rabah,Ibn e Abi Jamrah Nasar bin Imran etc. Pakistani Hadith Scholar Dr.Abu Hayyan Aadil Said in his research , criticised Salfi Scholar Albani,that Albani accept Shia & Rafidi Narrations of Sahi Bukhari & Sahi Muslim . Dr.Said told that Albani has no ethics about Hadiths but he follows old rules of acceptance of hadith like ,المتعة‎ , Donkey Meat , Pen & paper ,Loh e Fatima,hadith e Mahdi etc which all are fake & fabricated. Dr.Sai'd told that all Hadiths of كتاب الفتن in Bukhari and Muslim are fake and fabricated. He told that Bukhari & Muslim were taken thousands of fake & fabricated hadiths in their collections. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah). The early hadith narrators are listed as below,, 1. QASIM BIN MOHAMMED BIN ABI BAKAR ( RA ) 24 ~106 AH, grew up under the kind guardian ship of his Paternal Aunt Mother of Companions Ayesha Siddiqa RA after his father in 36 AH in the age of 12 years. Qasim bin Muhammed lived with Ayesha Siddiqa RA till her death in 58 AH.Qasim bin Muhammed narrated only 200 hadiths from the authority of Ayesha Siddiqa ,Abdullah bin Umar , Umme Salma , Ibn e Abbas etc. Qasim considered as the top scholar in Medinah. The golden chain of narrations are Qasim - Ayesha , Qasim - Ibn e Umar , Qasim - Umme Salma. 2. NAF'Y MULA IBN E UMAR , died in 117 AH. Naf,y Mula Ibn e Umar was the companion of Abdul bin Umar for 30 yeear.He narrated about 188 hadiths from Ibn e Umar. 3. HAMMAM IBN E MUNABBAH ( 40 ~ 131 AH ) Hammam Ibn e Munabbah was the student of Abu Huraira RA . Hammam narrated 139 hadiths from Abu Huraira RA. The collection of ibn e Munabbah considered the early written hadiths . It is called " Sahifa Hammam ibn e Munabbah ". Total no of Hadiths were less than 600 in First Century of Hijra. In the first quarter of second century Hijra Malik bin Anas ,compiler of Mut'a Imam Malik also compiled around 600 hadiths ,1100 Asar-e-Sahaba ( Narrations of the Companions of Rasool Allah SAW. It will clear that the total no of hadiths in first Hijri were around 600.
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah). The hadiths scholar Dr.Abu Hayyan Aadil Sai'd told in his research The early hadith narrators are listed as below,, 1. QASIM BIN MOHAMMED BIN ABI BAKAR ( RA ) 24 ~106 AH, grew up under the kind guardian ship of his Paternal Aunt Mother of Companions Ayesha Siddiqa RA after his father in 36 AH in the age of 12 years. Qasim bin Muhammed lived with Ayesha Siddiqa RA till her death in 58 AH.Qasim bin Muhammed narrated only 200 hadiths from the authority of Ayesha Siddiqa ,Abdullah bin Umar , Umme Salma , Ibn e Abbas etc. Qasim considered as the top scholar in Medinah. The golden chain of narrations are Qasim - Ayesha , Qasim - Ibn e Umar , Qasim - Umme Salma. 2. NAF'Y MULA IBN E UMAR , died in 117 AH. Naf,y Mula Ibn e Umar was the companion of Abdul bin Umar for 30 yeear.He narrated about 188 hadiths from Ibn e Umar. 3. HAMMAM IBN E MUNABBAH ( 40 ~ 131 AH ) Hammam Ibn e Munabbah was the student of Abu Huraira RA . Hammam narrated 139 hadiths from Abu Huraira RA. The collection of ibn e Munabbah considered the early written hadiths . It is called " Sahifa Hammam ibn e Munabbah ". Total no of Hadiths were less than 600 in First Century of Hijra. In the first quarter of second century Hijra Malik bin Anas ,compiler of Mut'a Imam Malik also compiled around 600 hadiths ,1100 Asar-e-Sahaba ( Narrations of the Companions of Rasool Allah SAW. It will clear that the total no of hadiths in first Hijri were around 600.
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ Aṯhar Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: الأثر‎, Aṯhar literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ Aṯhar Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: الأثر‎, Aṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed the Prophet Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of the prophet and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and the prophet's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts — the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and is attributed to Muhammad. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death and during his death for e.g if you look into a modern version of the book bulughul Marām (probably in a old version aswell unless they changed the chapter numbers) you will find in chapter 4 the chapter of zakah the 2nd hadith written during the life time of the prophet. but many generations later they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature so a actual book. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications though this is due to ignorance and a lack of studying and for some it's out of their desires they wish not to accept the ruling which you will find in hadīth created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Though the scholar of hadīth are able to differentiate between them Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements again that may seem contradictory to some as they have very little knowledge and they dont take thing like this situation into context although there may be some actual contradictory hadīth( as you can imagine these are not actually statements the prophet said, rather fabricatons) the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Aṯhar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith WERE written down by Muhammad's followers during his life time though many were also memorised but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature so made Into a actual book. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications ofcourse this is due to a lack of knowledge of the science for e.g the science of grading hadīth, studying this you will come to find how careful the scholars of hadīth were to not attribute something to the prophet which he did not say. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾaṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet . Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad [pbuh]). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century AD, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥādīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for word. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what mainstream Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯhar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ʾḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). Scriptural authority for hadith comes from the Quran which enjoins Muslims to emulate Muhammad and obey his judgments (in verses such as 24:54, 33:21). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). In Verse number 3 of Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Allah has clearly informed, about the chaining of future generation narrator works. The Arabic word مِنْهُمْ (ʾmin'hum) of verse number 3, that literally means "among them." In Quranic perspective, Clearly confirm that, the genre of future generation narrators was started and amplify by the companions of Islamic prophet Muhammad (PBUH). The verse number 2 more clearly informs about Sahabah and others people. He is the One Who raised for the illiterate ˹people˺ a messenger from among themselves—reciting to them His revelations, purifying them, and teaching them the Book and wisdom, for indeed they had previously been clearly astray— And others among them, who have not yet joined them. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. [Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Verse number 2-3] Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). In Verse number 3 of Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Allah has clearly informed, about the chaining of future generation narrator works. The Arabic word مِنْهُمْ (ʾmin'hum) of verse number 3, that literally means "among them." In Quranic perspective, Clearly confirm that, the genre of future generation narrators was started and amplify by the companions of Muhammad. The verse number 2 more clearly informs about Sahabah and others people. He is the One Who raised for the illiterate ˹people˺ a messenger from among themselves—reciting to them His revelations, purifying them, and teaching them the Book and wisdom, for indeed they had previously been clearly astray— And others among them, who have not yet joined them. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. [Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Verse number 2-3] Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). In Verse number 3 of Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Allah has clearly informed, about the chaining of future generation narrator works. The Arabic word مِنْهُمْ (ʾmin'hum) of verse number 3, that literally means "among them." In Quranic perspective, Clearly confirm that, the genre of future generation narrators was started and amplify by the companions of Muhammad. The verse number 2 more clearly informs about Sahabah and others people. He is the One Who raised for the illiterate ˹people˺ a messenger from among themselves—reciting to them His revelations, purifying them, and teaching them the Book and wisdom, for indeed they had previously been clearly astray— And others among them, who have not yet joined them. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. [Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Verse number 2-3] Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. Specially for verse number 100 of surah Al-Tawbah. As for the foremost—the first of the Emigrants and the Helpers—and those who follow them in goodness, Allah is pleased with them and they are pleased with Him. And He has prepared for them Gardens under which rivers flow, to stay there for ever and ever. That is the ultimate triumph.[Surah Al-Tawbah; 100. Dr. Mustafa Khattab, the Clear Quran] In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). In Verse number 3 of Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Allah has clearly informed, about the chaining of future generation narrator works. The Arabic word مِنْهُمْ (ʾmin'hum) of verse number 3, that literally means "From them." In Quranic perspective, Clearly confirm that, the genre of future generation narrators was started and amplify by the companions of Muhammad. The verse number 2 more clearly informs about Sahabah and others people. He is the One Who raised for the illiterate ˹people˺ a messenger from among themselves—reciting to them His revelations, purifying them, and teaching them the Book and wisdom, for indeed they had previously been clearly astray— And others from them, who have not yet joined them. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. [Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Verse number 2-3] Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. Specially for verse number 100 of surah Al-Tawbah. As for the foremost—the first of the Emigrants and the Helpers—and those who follow them in goodness, Allah is pleased with them and they are pleased with Him. And He has prepared for them Gardens under which rivers flow, to stay there for ever and ever. That is the ultimate triumph.[Surah Al-Tawbah; 100. Dr. Mustafa Khattab, the Clear Quran] In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications (Pseudepigrapha created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). In Verse number 3 of Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Allah has clearly informed, about the chaining of future generation narrator works. The Arabic word مِنْهُمْ (ʾmin'hum) of verse number 3, that literally means "From them." In Quranic perspective, Clearly confirm that, the genre of future generation narrators was started and amplify by the companions of Muhammad. The verse number 2 more clearly informs about Sahabah and others people. He is the One Who raised for the illiterate ˹people˺ a messenger from among themselves—reciting to them His revelations, purifying them, and teaching them the Book and wisdom, for indeed they had previously been clearly astray— And others from them, who have not yet joined them. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. [Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Verse number 2-3] Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. Specially for verse number 100 of surah Al-Tawbah. As for the foremost—the first of the Emigrants and the Helpers—and those who follow them in goodness, Allah is pleased with them and they are pleased with Him. And He has prepared for them Gardens under which rivers flow, to stay there for ever and ever. That is the ultimate triumph.[Surah Al-Tawbah; 100. Dr. Mustafa Khattab, the Clear Quran] In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications (Pseudepigrapha) created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). In Verse number 3 of Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Allah has clearly informed, about the chaining of future generation narrator works. The Arabic word مِنْهُمْ (ʾmin'hum) of verse number 3, that literally means "From them." In Quranic perspective, Clearly confirm that, the genre of future generation narrators was started and amplify by the companions of Muhammad. The verse number 2 more clearly informs about Sahabah and others people. He is the One Who raised for the illiterate ˹people˺ a messenger from among themselves—reciting to them His revelations, purifying them, and teaching them the Book and wisdom, for indeed they had previously been clearly astray— And others from them, who have not yet joined them. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. [Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Verse number 2-3] Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. Specially for verse number 100 of surah Al-Tawbah. As for the foremost—the first of the Emigrants and the Helpers—and those who follow them in goodness, Allah is pleased with them and they are pleased with Him. And He has prepared for them Gardens under which rivers flow, to stay there for ever and ever. That is the ultimate triumph.[Surah Al-Tawbah; 100. Dr. Mustafa Khattab, the Clear Quran] In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
  • Ḥadīth ( or ; Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīṯ Arabic pronunciation: [ħadiːθ], pl. aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʾaḥādīṯ, Arabic pronunciation: [ʔaħadiːθ], literally means "talk" or "discourse") or Athar (Arabic: أثر‎, ʾAṯar, literally means "tradition") in Islam refers to what the majority of Muslims believe to be a record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In Quranic perspective, Hadith also called the vast explanation (Arabic: بَيَانَهُۥ ʾbayānahu, literally means "it’s explanation.") of the Holy Quran, for verse number 16-19 of Surah Al-Qiyama. Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad). While the number of verses pertaining to law in the Quran is relatively few, hadith give direction on everything from details of religious obligations (such as Ghusl or Wudu, ablutions for salat prayer), to the correct forms of salutations and the importance of benevolence to slaves. Thus the "great bulk" of the rules of Sharia (Islamic law) are derived from hadith, rather than the Quran. Ḥadīth is the Arabic word for things like speech, report, account, narrative. Unlike the Quran, not all Muslims believe that hadith accounts (or at least not all hadith accounts) are divine revelation. Hadith were not written down by Muhammad's followers immediately after his death but many generations later when they were collected, collated and compiled into a great corpus of Islamic literature. Different collections of hadīth would come to differentiate the different branches of the Islamic faith. There are many modern Muslims (some of whom call themselves Quranists but many are also known as Submitters) who believe that most Hadiths are actually fabrications (pseudepigrapha) created in the 8th and 9th century CE, and which are falsely attributed to Muhammad. Because some hadith include questionable and even contradictory statements, the authentication of hadith became a major field of study in Islam. In its classic form a hadith has two parts—the chain of narrators who have transmitted the report (the isnad), and the main text of the report (the matn). In Verse number 3 of Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Allah has clearly informed, about the chaining of future generation narrator works. The Arabic word مِنْهُمْ (ʾmin'hum) of verse number 3, that literally means "From them." In Quranic perspective, Clearly confirm that, the genre of future generation narrators was started and amplify by the companions of Muhammad. The verse number 2 more clearly informs about Sahabah and others people. He is the One Who raised for the illiterate ˹people˺ a messenger from among themselves—reciting to them His revelations, purifying them, and teaching them the Book and wisdom, for indeed they had previously been clearly astray— And others from them, who have not yet joined them. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. [Surah Al-Jumu'ah, Verse number 2-3] Individual hadith are classified by Muslim clerics and jurists into categories such as sahih ("authentic"), hasan ("good") or da'if ("weak"). However, different groups and different scholars may classify a hadith differently. Among scholars of Sunni Islam the term hadith may include not only the words, advice, practices, etc. of Muhammad, but also those of his companions. Specially for verse number 100 of surah Al-Tawbah. As for the foremost—the first of the Emigrants and the Helpers—and those who follow them in goodness, Allah is pleased with them and they are pleased with Him. And He has prepared for them Gardens under which rivers flow, to stay there for ever and ever. That is the ultimate triumph.[Surah Al-Tawbah; 100. Dr. Mustafa Khattab, the Clear Quran] In Shia Islam, hadīth are the embodiment of the sunnah, the words and actions of Muhammad and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (The Twelve Imams and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah).
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