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Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.

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  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it ogle driven salubrious fealty is placed in the East of England region. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based inHertford, once the main market town.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. Thecounty area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The county area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town.
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  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The four towns that have between 50,000 and 100,000 residents are Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans. Hertford, once the main market town for the medieval agricultural county, derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt. The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field is reflected in the flag and coat of arms of Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford, and the only city in the county, St Albans have between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Hertford, once the main market town for the medieval agricultural county, derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt. The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field is reflected in the flag and coat of arms of Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it ogle driven salubrious fealty is placed in the East of England region. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford, and the only city in the county, St Albans have between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Hertford, once the main market town for the medieval agricultural county, derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt. The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field is reflected in the flag and coat of arms of Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Hertford, once the main market town for the medieval agricultural county, derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt. The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field is reflected in the flag and coat of arms of Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based inHertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field is reflected in the flag and coat of arms of Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field is reflected in the flag and coat of arms of Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field as reflected in the Hertfordshire|flag and coat of arms. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700 in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2). Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are high for the region in the north and west. These reach over 800 feet (240 m) in the western projection around Tring which is in the Chilterns. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field as reflected in the Hertfordshire flag and coat of arms. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. Thecounty area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700. Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are higher in the north and west; over 800 feet (240 m) in the Chilterns near Tring. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field as reflected in the Hertfordshire flag and coat of arms. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. Thecounty area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700. Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are higher in the north and west; over 800 feet (240 m) in the Chilterns near Tring. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field as reflected in the Hertfordshire flag and coat of arms. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London, the Midlands, and the North. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The county area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700. Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford and the only city in the county, St Albans, each has between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are higher in the north and west; over 800 feet (240 m) in the Chilterns near Tring. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field as reflected in the Hertfordshire flag and coat of arms. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London, the Midlands, and the North. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The county area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county population was 1,140,700, with Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford, and the only city in the county, St Albans, each having between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are higher in the north and west; over 800 feet (240 m) in the Chilterns near Tring. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt.The county's landmarks span many centuries, ranging from the Six Hills in the new town of Stevenage built by local inhabitants during the Roman period, to Leavesden Film Studios. The volume of intact medieval and Tudor buildings surpasses London, in places in well-preserved conservation areas, especially in St Albans which includes some remains of Verulamium, the town where in the 3rd century an early recorded British martyrdom took place. Saint Alban, a Romano-British soldier, took the place of a Christian priest and was beheaded on Holywell Hill. His martyr's cross of a yellow saltire on a blue field as reflected in the Hertfordshire flag and coat of arms. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London, the Midlands, and the North. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The county area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county population was 1,140,700, with Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford, and the only city in the county, St Albans, each having between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are higher in the north and west; over 800 feet (240 m) in the Chilterns near Tring. The county's borders are approximately the watersheds of the Colne and Lea; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London, the Midlands, and the North. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The county area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county population was 1,140,700, with Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford, and the only city in the county, St Albans, each having between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are higher in the north and west; over 800 feet (240 m) in the Chilterns near Tring. The county's borders are approximately the [[drainage divide of the River Lea and the Colne; both flowing to the south; each accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London, the Midlands, and the North. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
  • Hertfordshire ( (); often abbreviated Herts) is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region. The county area of is 634 square miles (1,640 km2). The medieval agricultural county derives its name from a hart (stag) and a ford, used as the components of the county's coat of arms and flag. Hertfordshire County Council is based in Hertford, once the main market town. In 2013, the county population was 1,140,700, with Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford, and the only city in the county, St Albans, each having between 50,000 and 100,000 residents. Elevations are higher in the north and west; over 800 feet (240 m) in the Chilterns near Tring. The county is approximately the drainage divide of the River Lea and the Colne; both flowto the south; both are accompanied by a canal. Hertfordshire's undeveloped land is mainly agricultural and much is protected by green belt. Hertfordshire is well-served with motorways and railways, providing good access to London, the Midlands, and the North. The largest sector of the economy of the county is in services.
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