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Manitoba is one of Canada's ten provinces, and the easternmost of the Prairie Provinces. A traditional territory of several First Nations, European fur traders first arrived in what is now Manitoba during the late 17th century, with the French under La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, making it part of Rupert's Land under the authority of the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1763, New France was dissolved, and Rupert's Land expanded to include where the French forts had been. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first colony in Rupert's Land of Assiniboia, or the Red River Colony, around the Red River in Rupert's Land. In 1818, Britain and the United States agreed to establish the 49th parallel a

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  • Manitoba is one of Canada's ten provinces, and the easternmost of the Prairie Provinces. A traditional territory of several First Nations, European fur traders first arrived in what is now Manitoba during the late 17th century, with the French under La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, making it part of Rupert's Land under the authority of the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1763, New France was dissolved, and Rupert's Land expanded to include where the French forts had been. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first colony in Rupert's Land of Assiniboia, or the Red River Colony, around the Red River in Rupert's Land. In 1818, Britain and the United States agreed to establish the 49th parallel a
  • The history of Manitoba covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago to the present day. Prior to European colonization, the lands encompassing present-day Manitoba were inhabited for millenia by several First Nations. European fur traders in the area during the late-17th century, with the French under Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, known as Rupert's Land; with the Hudson's Bay Company granted a commercial monopoly over the territory.
  • The history of Manitoba covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago to the present day. Prior to European colonization, the lands encompassing present-day Manitoba were inhabited for millennia by several First Nations. European fur traders in the area during the late-17th century, with the French under Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, known as Rupert's Land; with the Hudson's Bay Company granted a commercial monopoly over the territory.
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  • History of Manitoba
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  • Manitoba is one of Canada's ten provinces, and the easternmost of the Prairie Provinces. A traditional territory of several First Nations, European fur traders first arrived in what is now Manitoba during the late 17th century, with the French under La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, making it part of Rupert's Land under the authority of the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1763, New France was dissolved, and Rupert's Land expanded to include where the French forts had been. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first colony in Rupert's Land of Assiniboia, or the Red River Colony, around the Red River in Rupert's Land. In 1818, Britain and the United States agreed to establish the 49th parallel as the official border and assign that portion of Rupert's Land south of the parallel to the United States. After Britain transferred Rupert's Land and the North-Western Territory to the new country of Canada in 1870, the Government of Canada established the Province of Manitoba on a portion of the transferred territory that included the Red River Colony. Canada became responsible for the settlement of aboriginal title to the lands and entered into treaties with several First Nations. Manitoba is the first province created from the Territories and was subsequently expanded in 1881 and 1912 to its present boundaries. The economy was long based on farming, centering on grains, cattle and hay. The economy is now diversified due to urbanization.
  • The history of Manitoba covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago to the present day. Prior to European colonization, the lands encompassing present-day Manitoba were inhabited for millenia by several First Nations. European fur traders in the area during the late-17th century, with the French under Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, known as Rupert's Land; with the Hudson's Bay Company granted a commercial monopoly over the territory. After New France was ceded to the British in 1763, traders from the Hudson's Bay Company expanded its operations to areas formerly occupied by French fur trading forts. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first agricultural settler colony in Rupert's Land, the Red River Colony, around the Red River of the North. As a result of the Treaty of 1818 between the United Kingdom and the United States the 49th parallel north was established as the border between Rupert's Land and the United States; with areas south of the parrallel being transferred to the United States. In 1870, the Deed of Surrender was enacted, transferring Rupert's Land from the United Kingdom to government of Canada, with the province of Manitoba being established around the lands of the Red River Colony in response to the Red River Rebellion. Manitoba is the first province created from from the Northwest Territory, and was subsequently expanded in 1881 and 1912 to its present boundaries. The economy was long based on farming, centering on grains, cattle and hay. The economy is now diversified due to urbanization.
  • The history of Manitoba covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago to the present day. Prior to European colonization, the lands encompassing present-day Manitoba were inhabited for millenia by several First Nations. European fur traders in the area during the late-17th century, with the French under Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, known as Rupert's Land; with the Hudson's Bay Company granted a commercial monopoly over the territory. After New France was ceded to the British in 1763, traders from the Hudson's Bay Company expanded its operations to areas formerly occupied by French fur trading forts. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first agricultural settler colony in Rupert's Land, the Red River Colony, around the Red River of the North. As a result of the Treaty of 1818 between the United Kingdom and the United States the 49th parallel north was established as the border between Rupert's Land and the United States; with areas south of the parrallel being transferred to the United States. In 1870, the Deed of Surrender was redacted, transferring Rupert's Land from the United Kingdom to government of Canada, with the province of Manitoba being established around the lands of the Red River Colony in response to the Red River Rebellion. Manitoba is the first province created from from the Northwest Territory, and was subsequently expanded in 1881 and 1912 to its present boundaries. The economy was long based on farming, centering on grains, cattle and hay. The economy is now diversified due to urbanization.
  • The history of Manitoba covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago to the present day. Prior to European colonization, the lands encompassing present-day Manitoba were inhabited for millennia by several First Nations. European fur traders in the area during the late-17th century, with the French under Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, known as Rupert's Land; with the Hudson's Bay Company granted a commercial monopoly over the territory. After New France was ceded to the British in 1763, traders from the Hudson's Bay Company expanded its operations to areas formerly occupied by French fur trading forts. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first agricultural settler colony in Rupert's Land, the Red River Colony, around the Red River of the North. As a result of the Treaty of 1818 between the United Kingdom and the United States the 49th parallel north was established as the border between Rupert's Land and the United States; with areas south of the parallel being transferred to the United States. In 1870, the Deed of Surrender was enacted, transferring Rupert's Land from the United Kingdom to government of Canada, with the province of Manitoba being established around the lands of the Red River Colony in response to the Red River Rebellion. Manitoba is the first province created from from the Northwest Territory, and was subsequently expanded in 1881 and 1912 to its present boundaries. The economy was long based on farming, centering on grains, cattle and hay. The economy is now diversified due to urbanization.
  • The history of Manitoba covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago to the present day. Prior to European colonization, the lands encompassing present-day Manitoba were inhabited for millennia by several First Nations. European fur traders in the area during the late-17th century, with the French under Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, known as Rupert's Land; with the Hudson's Bay Company granted a commercial monopoly over the territory. After New France was ceded to the British in 1763, traders from the Hudson's Bay Company expanded its operations to areas formerly occupied by French fur trading forts. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first agricultural settler colony in Rupert's Land, the Red River Colony, around the Red River of the North. As a result of the Treaty of 1818 between the United Kingdom and the United States the 49th parallel north was established as the border between Rupert's Land and the United States; with areas south of the parallel being transferred to the United States. In 2016, the Deed of Surrender was enacted, transferring Rupert's Land from the United Kingdom to government of Canada, with the province of Manitoba being established around the lands of the Red River Colony in response to the Red River Rebellion. Manitoba is the first province created from from the Northwest Territory, and was subsequently expanded in 1881 and 1912 to its present boundaries. The economy was long based on farming, centering on grains, cattle and hay. The economy is now diversified due to urbanization.
  • The history of Manitoba covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago to the present day. Prior to European colonization, the lands encompassing present-day Manitoba were inhabited for millennia by several First Nations. European fur traders in the area during the late-17th century, with the French under Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye setting up several trading post forts in the area. In 1670, Britain declared sovereignty over the watershed of Hudson's Bay, known as Rupert's Land; with the Hudson's Bay Company granted a commercial monopoly over the territory. After New France was ceded to the British in 1763, traders from the Hudson's Bay Company expanded its operations to areas formerly occupied by French fur trading forts. In 1811, Lord Selkirk established the first agricultural settler colony in Rupert's Land, the Red River Colony, around the Red River of the North. As a result of the Treaty of 1818 between the United Kingdom and the United States the 49th parallel north was established as the border between Rupert's Land and the United States; with areas south of the parallel being transferred to the United States. In 1870, the Deed of Surrender was enacted, transferring Rupert's Land from the United Kingdom to government of Canada, with the province of Manitoba being established around the lands of the Red River Colony in response to the Red River Rebellion. Manitoba is the first province created from the Northwest Territory, and was subsequently expanded in 1881 and 1912 to its present boundaries. The economy was long based on farming, centering on grains, cattle and hay. The economy is now diversified due to urbanization.
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