The Wales national football team is the third oldest side in international association football. Wales played its first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win its first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, despite the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for internatio

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  • The Wales national football team is the third oldest side in international association football. Wales played its first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win its first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, despite the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for internatio
  • The Wales national football team is the third oldest side in international association football. Wales played its first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win its first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for internati
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. Wales played its first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win its first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for internati
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. Wales played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for inter
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. The side played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. Wales played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland, and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 tournament and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. The side played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. Wales played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland, and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 tournament and this remained the nation's only triumph before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The
rdfs:label
  • History of the Wales national football team (1876–1976)
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has abstract
  • The Wales national football team is the third oldest side in international association football. Wales played its first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win its first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, despite the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales was forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. Able to call upon its strongest side, Wales enjoyed its most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 editions. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for its first World Cup in 1958 and progressed from its group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final in its following match. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship 12 times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in its centenary year, before being defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third oldest side in international association football. Wales played its first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win its first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales was forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. Able to call upon its strongest side, Wales enjoyed its most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 editions. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for its first World Cup in 1958 and progressed from its group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final in its following match. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship 12 times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in its centenary year, before being defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. Wales played its first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win its first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales was forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. Able to call upon its strongest side, Wales enjoyed its most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 editions. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for its first World Cup in 1958 and progressed from its group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final in its following match. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship 12 times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in its centenary year, before being defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. Wales played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales were forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. Able to call upon its strongest side, Wales enjoyed their most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 editions. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for their first World Cup in 1958 and progressed from their group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final in the following round. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship 12 times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in its centenary year, before being defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. Wales played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales were forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. Able to call upon its strongest side, Wales enjoyed their most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 editions. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for their first World Cup in 1958 and progressed from their group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final in the following round. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship 12 times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in their centenary year, before being defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. Wales played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales were forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. By the late 1930s, Wales were again able to call upon its strongest side, Wales enjoyed their most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 editions. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for their first World Cup in 1958 and progressed from their group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final in the following round. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship 12 times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in their centenary year, before being defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. Wales played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. The team played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 edition of the competition and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales were forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. By the late 1930s, Wales were again able to call upon their strongest side, and enjoyed their most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 editions. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for their first World Cup in 1958 and progressed from their group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final in the following round. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship 12 times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in their centenary year, where they were defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. The side played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. Wales played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland, and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 tournament and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales were forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. By the late 1930s, Wales were again able to call upon their strongest side, and enjoyed their most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 tournaments. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for their first World Cup in the 1958 tournament and progressed from their group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship twelve times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of UEFA Euro 1976 in their centenary year, where they were defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. The side played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. Wales played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland, and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 tournament and the triumph remained the nation's only one before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales were forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. By the late 1930s, Wales were again able to call upon their strongest side, and enjoyed their most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against numerous other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 tournaments. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for their first World Cup in the 1958 tournament and progressed from their group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship twelve times, sharing five titles. Bowen left the role in 1974, having turned down the chance to take the position full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of the 1976 European Championships in their centenary year, where they were defeated by Yugoslavia.
  • The Wales national football team is the third-oldest side in international association football. The side played their first fixture in March 1876, four years after Scotland and England had contested the first-ever international match. Wales played annual fixtures against Scotland, England, and later Ireland, and these were eventually organised into the British Home Championship, an annual competition between the Home Nations. Wales did not win their first championship until the 1906–07 tournament and this remained the nation's only triumph before the First World War. Wales improved considerably in the post-war period, and claimed three titles during the 1920s, although the team was often hindered by the reluctance of Football League clubs to release its players for international duty. The situation was so grave that, in the early 1930s, Wales were forced to select a team of lower league and amateur players in a side that became known as "Keenor and the 10 unknowns", a reference to captain Fred Keenor and the relative obscurity of his teammates. By the late 1930s, Wales were again able to call upon their strongest side, and enjoyed their most successful period in the British Home Championship, winning four titles in the six years before the Second World War. When competitive football resumed after the war, Wales began facing opponents from farther afield and played matches against other European nations for the first time. The side also began competing in qualification groups for the FIFA World Cup, but failed to qualify for the 1950 and 1954 tournaments. Under manager Jimmy Murphy, Wales qualified for their first World Cup in the 1958 tournament and progressed from their group before being defeated by Brazil in the quarter-final. The side suffered a decline in the 1960s as the 1958 World Cup generation gradually retired. Dave Bowen replaced Murphy and managed the team for a decade on a part-time basis but enjoyed little success, failing to qualify for a World Cup or the early editions of the European Nations' Cup (later known as the European Championships). He did help the side to share the British Home Championship during the 1969–70 season, the last time Wales won the tournament before the competition was discontinued. In total, Wales won the championship twelve times, sharing five titles. Bowen left in 1974, having turned down the chance to manage full-time. He was replaced by Englishman Mike Smith who led the side to the quarter-finals of the 1976 European Championships in their centenary year, when they were defeated by Yugoslavia.
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