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John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention.

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  • John Demjanjuk
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  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. He was prosecuted on charges of war crimes in Israel and Germany. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention.
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  • John Demjanjuk
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  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. He served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. In 1952, he emigrated from West Germany to the United States. He took up residence in Seven Hills, Ohio, where he worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man, and based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors, he was identified as the notorious and savagely violent Treblinka extermination camp guard "Ivan the Terrible". These accusations culminated in Demjanjuk's extradition to Israel in 1986. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence throughout the trial, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity, and in 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over the identity of "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibor, Israel declined to prosecute, and in September 1993 Demjanjuk returned to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time he was alleged to have served as a guard there. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. He served as a guard for the Germans at the Sobibor extermination camp, and in at least two concentration camps. In 1952, he emigrated from West Germany to the United States. He took up residence in Seven Hills, Ohio, where he worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man, and based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors, he was identified as the notorious and savagely violent Treblinka extermination camp guard "Ivan the Terrible". These accusations culminated in Demjanjuk's extradition to Israel in 1986. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence throughout the trial, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity, and in 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over the identity of "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibor, Israel declined to prosecute, and in September 1993 Demjanjuk returned to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time he was alleged to have served as a guard there. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Soviet Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. He served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. In 1952, he emigrated from West Germany to the United States. He took up residence in Seven Hills, Ohio, where he worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man, and based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors, he was identified as the notorious and savagely violent Treblinka extermination camp guard "Ivan the Terrible". These accusations culminated in Demjanjuk's extradition to Israel in 1986. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence throughout the trial, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity, and in 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over the identity of "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibor, Israel declined to prosecute, and in September 1993 Demjanjuk returned to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time he was alleged to have served as a guard there. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Soviet Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. He served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. In 1952, he emigrated from West Germany to the United States. He took up residence in Seven Hills, Ohio, where he worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man. Based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors, he was identified as the notorious and savagely violent Treblinka extermination camp guard known as "Ivan the Terrible". These accusations culminated in Demjanjuk's extradition to Israel in 1986 for trial. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence throughout the trial, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity. In 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over the identity of "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibor, Israel declined to prosecute. In September 1993 Demjanjuk was allowed to return to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time when he was alleged to have served there as a guard. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. He was prosecuted on charges of war crimes in Israel and Germany. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Soviet Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. He served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. After marrying a woman he met in a displaced persons camp, in 1952, he emigrated with her and their daughter from West Germany to the United States. They settled in Seven Hills, Ohio, where they raised a family. Demjanjuk worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man. Based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors, he was identified as the notorious and savagely violent Treblinka extermination camp guard known as "Ivan the Terrible". These accusations culminated in Demjanjuk's extradition to Israel in 1986 for trial. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence throughout the trial, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity. In 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over the identity of "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibor, Israel declined to prosecute. In September 1993 Demjanjuk was allowed to return to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time when he was alleged to have served there as a guard. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. He was prosecuted on charges of war crimes in Israel and Germany. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Soviet Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. A POW, he was trained and served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. After the war he married a woman he met while they were both still in a displaced persons camp, seeking to leave West Germany; in 1952 he emigrated with her and their daughter to the United States. They settled in Seven Hills, Ohio, where they had two more children and raised their family. Demjanjuk worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man. Based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors in Israel, he was identified as the notorious Treblinka extermination camp guard known as "Ivan the Terrible" for his cruelty. Demjanjuk was extradited to Israel in 1986 for trial. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity. In 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over his identity as "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibor, Israel declined to prosecute. In September 1993 Demjanjuk was allowed to return to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time when he was alleged to have served there as a guard. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. He was prosecuted on charges of war crimes in Israel and Germany. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Soviet Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. A POW, he was trained and served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. After the war he married a woman he met while they were both still in a displaced persons camp, seeking to leave West Germany; in 1952 he emigrated with her and their daughter to the United States. They settled in Seven Hills, Ohio, where they had two more children and raised their family. Demjanjuk became a US citizen in 1958 and worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man. Based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors in Israel, he was identified as the notorious Treblinka extermination camp guard known as "Ivan the Terrible" for his cruelty. Demjanjuk was extradited to Israel in 1986 for trial. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity. In 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over his identity as "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibor, Israel declined to prosecute. In September 1993 Demjanjuk was allowed to return to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time when he was alleged to have served there as a guard. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. He was prosecuted on charges of war crimes in Israel and Germany. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Soviet Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. A POW, he was trained and served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. After the war he married a woman he met while they were both still in a displaced persons camp, seeking to leave West Germany; in 1952 he emigrated with her and their daughter to the United States. They settled in Seven Hills, Ohio, where they had two more children and raised their family. Demjanjuk became a US citizen in 1958 and worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man. Based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors in Israel, he was identified as the notorious Treblinka extermination camp guard known as "Ivan the Terrible" for his cruelty. Demjanjuk was extradited to Israel in 1986 for trial. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity. In 1993 the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over his identity as "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibóor, Israel declined to prosecute. In September 1993 Demjanjuk was allowed to return to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time when he was alleged to have served there as a guard. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent. In January 2020 an exhibit in Berlin was held and a related book published of photographs from Sobibor and other places from World War II, taken and collected by Johann Niemann during his SS career. Two photos may show Demjanjuk with other soldiers at Sobibór.
  • John Demjanjuk (born Ivan Mykolaiovych Demjanjuk; Ukrainian: Іван Миколайович Дем'янюк; 3 April 1920 – 17 March 2012) was a Ukrainian-American accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity carried out while serving as a guard at Nazi extermination camps during World War II. Legal cases concerning his participation in the Holocaust began during the 1970s and continued until his death in 2012. He was prosecuted on charges of war crimes in Israel and Germany. During that time, Demjanjuk's trials attracted global media attention. Born in 1920 in Soviet Ukraine, Demjanjuk was conscripted into the Soviet Red Army in 1940. He fought in World War II and was taken prisoner by the Germans in the Spring of 1942. A POW, he was trained and served as a guard at the Sobibor extermination camp, and at least two concentration camps. After the war he married a woman he met while they were both still in a displaced persons camp, seeking to leave West Germany; in 1952 he emigrated with her and their daughter to the United States. They settled in Seven Hills, Ohio, where they had two more children and raised their family. Demjanjuk became a US citizen in 1958 and worked in an auto factory until his retirement. In August 1977, Demjanjuk was accused of having been a Trawniki man. Based on eyewitness testimony by Holocaust survivors in Israel, he was identified as the notorious Treblinka extermination camp guard known as "Ivan the Terrible" for his cruelty. Demjanjuk was extradited to Israel in 1986 for trial. In 1988, Demjanjuk was convicted and sentenced to death. He maintained his innocence, claiming that it was a case of mistaken identity. In 1993, the verdict was overturned by the Israeli Supreme Court, based on new evidence that cast reasonable doubt over his identity as "Ivan the Terrible". Although the judges agreed that there was sufficient evidence to show that Demjanjuk had served at Sobibóor, Israel declined to prosecute. In September 1993, Demjanjuk was allowed to return to Ohio. In 1999, US prosecutors again sought to deport Demjanjuk for having been a concentration camp guard, and his citizenship was revoked in 2002. In 2009, Germany requested his extradition for over 27,900 counts of acting as an accessory to murder: one for each person killed at Sobibor during the time when he was alleged to have served there as a guard. He was deported from the US to Germany in that same year. On 12 May 2011, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. According to historian Lawrence Douglas, in spite of serious missteps along the way, the German verdict brought the case "to a worthy and just conclusion". After the conviction, Demjanjuk was released pending appeal. He lived at a German nursing home in Bad Feilnbach, where he died on 17 March 2012. Having died before a final judgment on his appeal could be issued, by German law Demjanjuk remains technically innocent. In January 2020 an exhibit in Berlin was held and a related book published of photographs from Sobibor and other places from World War II, taken and collected by Johann Niemann during his SS career. Two photos may show Demjanjuk with other soldiers at Sobibór.
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