About: Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : wikidata:Q24229398, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FLady_Margaret_Beaufort

Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was the mother of King Henry VII and paternal grandmother of King Henry VIII of England. She was a key figure in the Wars of the Roses and an influential matriarch of the House of Tudor. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Margaret Beaufort
rdfs:comment
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was the mother of King Henry VII and paternal grandmother of King Henry VIII of England. She was a key figure in the Wars of the Roses and an influential matriarch of the House of Tudor. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendent of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalizing on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most infamous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most infamous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most famous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I.With her son crowned Henry VII of England, Beaufort wielded a considerable degree of poli
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field . She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III and the main catalyst in the murder of the Princes in the Tower, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field . She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty.
rdfs:label
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort
has abstract
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was the mother of King Henry VII and paternal grandmother of King Henry VIII of England. She was a key figure in the Wars of the Roses and an influential matriarch of the House of Tudor. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendent of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalizing on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most infamous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I. With her son crowned Henry VII of England, Beaufort wielded a considerable degree of political influence and personal autonomy – both unusual for a woman of her time. She was also a major patron and cultural benefactor during her son’s reign, initiating an era of extensive Tudor patronage. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most infamous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I. With her son crowned Henry VII of England, Beaufort wielded a considerable degree of political influence and personal autonomy – both unusual for a woman of her time. She was also a major patron and cultural benefactor during her son’s reign, initiating an era of extensive Tudor patronage. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most famous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I.With her son crowned Henry VII of England, Beaufort wielded a considerable degree of political influence and personal autonomy – both unusual for a woman of her time. She was also a major patron and cultural benefactor during her son’s reign, initiating an era of extensive Tudor patronage. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field . She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most famous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I.With her son crowned Henry VII of England, Beaufort wielded a considerable degree of political influence and personal autonomy – both unusual for a woman of her time. She was also a major patron and cultural benefactor during her son’s reign, initiating an era of extensive Tudor patronage. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.
  • Lady Margaret Beaufort (usually pronounced: , BOH-fərt; or , BEW-fərt) (31 May 1441/3 – 29 June 1509) was a major figure in the Wars of the Roses of the late fifteenth century. A descendant of King Edward III and the main catalyst in the murder of the Princes in the Tower, Beaufort passed a disputed claim to the English throne to her son, Henry Tudor. Capitalising on the political upheaval of the period, she actively maneuvered to secure the crown for her son. Beaufort’s efforts ultimately culminated in Henry’s decisive victory over King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field . She was thus instrumental in orchestrating the ascension of the Tudor Dynasty. Of it would come two of Britain’s most famous monarchs: Henry VIII (her paternal grandson) and Elizabeth I.With her son crowned Henry VII of England, Beaufort wielded a considerable degree of political influence and personal autonomy – both unusual for a woman of her time. She was also a major patron and cultural benefactor during her son’s reign, initiating an era of extensive Tudor patronage. She is credited with the establishment of two prominent Cambridge colleges, founding Christ's College in 1505 and beginning the development of St John's College, which was completed posthumously by her executors in 1511. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, the first Oxford college to admit women, is named after her and has a statue of her in the college chapel.
birth date
birth place
birth year
child
death date
death place
death year
person function
title
  • Countess of Richmond and Derby
  • King's Mother
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
Link from a Wikipage to an external page
extraction datetime
Link to the Wikipage history URL
Wikipage page ID
page length (characters) of wiki page
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3318 as of Jun 25 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2020 OpenLink Software