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The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories.

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  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven, debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven,, debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven,,1935 debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly.
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  • Lincoln–Douglas debates
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  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories. Lincoln and Douglas decided to hold one debate in each of the nine congressional districts in Illinois. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states, as the issue of slavery was of national importance to citizens throughout the nation. According to the Chicago Daily Times, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present at the Alton debate. Newspaper coverage of the debates was intense. They were widely reported on nationally, Major papers from Chicago sent stenographers to create complete texts of each debate, which newspapers reprinted in full throughout the country, using the recently-invented telegraph. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate addresses were also published as pamphlets. The widespread press coverage of the debates turned Lincoln into a national figure. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories. Lincoln and Douglas decided to hold one debate in each of the nine congressional districts in Illinois. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states, as the issue of slavery was of national importance to citizens throughout the nation. According to the Chicago Daily Times, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present at the Alton debate. Newspaper coverage of the debates was intense. They were widely reported on nationally, major papers from Chicago sent stenographers to create complete texts of each debate, which newspapers reprinted in full throughout the country, using the recently-invented telegraph. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate addresses were also published as pamphlets. The widespread press coverage of the debates turned Lincoln into a national figure. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories. Lincoln and Douglas decided to hold one debate in each of the nine congressional districts in Illinois. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states, as the issue of slavery was of national importance to citizens throughout the nation. According to the Chicago Daily Times, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present at the Alton debate. Newspaper coverage of the debates was intense. They were widely reported on nationally; major papers from Chicago sent stenographers to create complete texts of each debate, which newspapers reprinted in full throughout the country, using the recently-invented telegraph. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate addresses were also published as pamphlets. The widespread press coverage of the debates turned Lincoln into a national figure. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories. Lincoln and Douglas decided to hold one debate in each of the nine congressional districts in Illinois. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states, as the issue of slavery was of national importance to citizens throughout the nation. According to the Chicago Daily Times, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present at the Alton debate. Newspaper coverage of the debates was intense. They were widely reported on nationally; major papers from Chicago sent stenographers to create complete texts of each debate, which newspapers reprinted in full throughout the country, using the recently invented telegraph. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate addresses were also published as pamphlets. The widespread press coverage of the debates turned Lincoln into a national figure. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven, debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories. Lincoln and Douglas decided to hold one debate in each of the nine congressional districts in Illinois. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states, as the issue of slavery was of national importance to citizens throughout the nation. According to the Chicago Daily Times, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present at the Alton debate. Newspaper coverage of the debates was intense. They were widely reported on nationally; major papers from Chicago sent stenographers to create complete texts of each debate, which newspapers reprinted in full throughout the country, using the recently invented telegraph. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate addresses were also published as pamphlets. The widespread press coverage of the debates turned Lincoln into a national figure. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven,, debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories. Lincoln and Douglas decided to hold one debate in each of the nine congressional districts in Illinois. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states, as the issue of slavery was of national importance to citizens throughout the nation. According to the Chicago Daily Times, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present at the Alton debate. Newspaper coverage of the debates was intense. They were widely reported on nationally; major papers from Chicago sent stenographers to create complete texts of each debate, which newspapers reprinted in full throughout the country, using the recently invented telegraph. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate addresses were also published as pamphlets. The widespread press coverage of the debates turned Lincoln into a national figure. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven,,1935 debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly for their respective parties. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln later faced after his victory in the 1860 presidential election. Illinois was a free state, and the main issue discussed in all seven debates was slavery in the United States, particularly its future expansion into new territories. Lincoln and Douglas decided to hold one debate in each of the nine congressional districts in Illinois. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states, as the issue of slavery was of national importance to citizens throughout the nation. According to the Chicago Daily Times, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present at the Alton debate. Newspaper coverage of the debates was intense. They were widely reported on nationally; major papers from Chicago sent stenographers to create complete texts of each debate, which newspapers reprinted in full throughout the country, using the recently invented telegraph. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate addresses were also published as pamphlets. The widespread press coverage of the debates turned Lincoln into a national figure. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly. The debates were the original media event: their goal was to generate publicity. Lincoln and Douglas decided, to maximize it, and for the political symbolism, to hold one debate in each of Illinois’s nine congressional districts. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The topic was slavery, the great topic of the day, that was tearing the nation apart. It was not slavery in Illinois that was being debated; Illinois, however reluctantly, had been a free state since 1848. It was slavery in the United States, specifically whether slavery would or would not be permitted in the new states to be created out of the Louisiana Purchase and the Mexican Cession. These were federal territories without local governing bodies, in fact without any local government except tiny spots or forts. was also a purely federal question, but slavery existed there from the birth of the District, and ending slavery there would free few slaves—they would have been sold in Maryland or Virginia—and it was politically impossible. By focusing on the new western territories the question was clear: what was the federal—national—policy on slavery? The slave state of Missouri, with strong support from the other slave states, wanted the Missouri Compromise to be rescinded and for new slave states to be created, starting with Kansas. Never had there been newspaper coverage of such intensity. The state’s largest newspapers, from Chicago, sent reporter-stenographers to report complete texts of each debate; thanks to the new railroads, the debates were not hard to reach with Chicago as a starting point. Reporters sent their copy to Chicago using the recently invented telegraph, and the papers immediately published the texts in full, within hours of the speeches having been given. Not only did they appear in Chicago, the newswire of the Associated Press sent messages simultaneously to multiple points, so newspapers all across the country east of the Rocky Mountains printed them, and the debates quickly became national events. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. This was legal. Some of the debate speeches were also published as pamphlets. The debates took place between August and October of 1858. By the last one, in Alton, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present, a crowd never seen before in the United States, according to the Chicago Daily Times. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states. Illinois voters decided Douglas would continue as Senator, so he won the debates. However, the publicity made Lincoln a national figure, and his “A house divided against itself, cannot stand” a prophecy. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
  • The Lincoln–Douglas debates (also known as The Great Debates of 1858) were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican Party candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. Until the 17th Constitutional Amendment of 1913, senators were elected by state legislatures, so Lincoln and Douglas were trying to win control of the Illinois General Assembly. The debates were the original media event: their goal was to generate publicity. Lincoln and Douglas decided, to maximize it, and for the political symbolism, to hold one debate in each of Illinois’s nine congressional districts. Both candidates had already spoken in Springfield and Chicago within a day of each other, so they decided that their joint appearances would be held in the remaining seven districts. Each debate lasted 3 hours. The format was that one candidate spoke for 60 minutes, then the other candidate spoke for 90 minutes, and then the first candidate was allowed a 30-minute rejoinder. The candidates alternated speaking first. As the incumbent, Douglas spoke first in four of the debates. The topic was slavery, the great topic of the day, that was tearing the nation apart. It was not slavery in Illinois that was being debated; Illinois, however reluctantly, had been a free state since 1848. It was slavery in the United States, specifically whether slavery would or would not be permitted in the new states to be created out of the Louisiana Purchase and the Mexican Cession. These were federal territories without local governing bodies, in fact without any local government except tiny spots or forts. was also a purely federal question, but slavery existed there from the birth of the District, and ending slavery there would free few slaves—they would have been sold in Maryland or Virginia—and it was politically impossible. By focusing on the new western territories the question was clear: what was the federal—national—policy on slavery? The slave state of Missouri, with strong support from the other slave states, wanted the Missouri Compromise to be rescinded and for new slave states to be created, starting with Kansas. Never had there been newspaper coverage of such intensity. The state’s largest newspapers, from Chicago, sent reporter-stenographers to report complete texts of each debate; thanks to the new railroads, the debates were not hard to reach with Chicago as a starting point. Reporters sent their copy to Chicago using the recently invented telegraph, and the papers immediately published the texts in full, within hours of the speeches having been given. Not only did they appear in Chicago, the newswire of the Associated Press sent messages simultaneously to multiple points, so newspapers all across the country east of the Rocky Mountains printed them, and the debates quickly became national events. Newspapers that supported Douglas edited his speeches to remove any errors made by the stenographers and to correct grammatical errors, while they left Lincoln's speeches in the rough form in which they had been transcribed. In the same way, pro-Lincoln papers edited Lincoln's speeches, but left the Douglas texts as reported. Some of the debate speeches were also published as pamphlets. The debates took place between August and October of 1858. By the last one, in Alton, there were 5,000 to 10,000 present, a crowd never seen before in the United States, according to the Chicago Daily Times. The debates near Illinois's borders (Freeport, Quincy, and Alton) drew large numbers of people from neighboring states. Illinois voters decided Douglas would continue as Senator, so he won the debates. However, the publicity made Lincoln a national figure, and his “A house divided against itself, cannot stand” a prophecy. As part of his 1860 campaign for president he edited the texts of all the debates and had them published in a book. The book sold well, and helped him get the Republican Party's nomination for president at the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
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  • 1859 United States Senate election in Illinois
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