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The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia.

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  • New Georgia counterattack
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  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were |attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia. After the Japanese counterattack was defeated, the Americans and their allies captured the airfield in the Battle of Munda Point in early August.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia. After the Japanese counterattack was defeated, the Americans and their allies captured the airfield in the Battle of Munda Point in early August.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the [New Georgia campaign]] in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese effort was ultimately unsucessful and in the wake of the attack the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive that ultimately captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese effort was ultimately unsucessful and in the wake of the attack the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive that ultimately captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese effort was ultimately unsuccessful and in the wake of the attack the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive that ultimately captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese attack saw one infantry regiment carry out a frontal assault against the center and left of the U.S. front line, while another carried out a flanking attack on their left. While the frontal assault was checked, the flanking attack succeeded in breaking into the rear of the U.S. beachhead. Many casualties were inflicted among the logistics, support a
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel.
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  • New Georgia counterattack
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  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were |attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia. The Americans landed reconnaissance elements around Zanana on New Georgia on 30 July. These were followed by main force elements on 2 July 1943, crossing from Rendova where they had landed on 30 June, and made limited gains in their drive toward Munda Point and advanced slowly against strong opposition. From the outset, the Japanese forces around Zanana, consisting largely of troops from the 229th Infantry Regiment and 8th Combined Special Naval Landing Force fought to delay the US advance while reinforcements could be dispatched. Over the course of several weeks, they delayed the US troops' westward advance on Munda and after an attempt to outflank their positions was defeated, began preparing for a counterattack. The objective of the Japanese counterattack was to destroy the American forces on New Georgia by attacking their exposed flank and rear areas. General Minoru Sasaki launched his counterattack at the moment that the US advance halted to reorganize, committing the 13th Infantry Regiment, under Colonel Tomonari Satoshi. The Japanese succeeded in infiltrating and attacking several isolated outposts in the American rear areas, but failed to inflict significant casualties on the American forces. The US forces were able to maintain communications with their supporting artillery battalions and called down heavy barrages in response, disrupting the attack. The beachhead area was also attacked, but a force of Marines ambushed the attackers moving from the command post, breaking up the attack. After the Japanese counterattack was defeated, the Americans and their allies captured the airfield in the Battle of Munda Point in early August.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia. The Americans landed reconnaissance elements around Zanana on New Georgia on 30 July. These were followed by main force elements on 2 July 1943, crossing from Rendova where they had landed on 30 June, and made limited gains in their drive toward Munda Point and advanced slowly against strong opposition. From the outset, the Japanese forces around Zanana, consisting largely of troops from the 229th Infantry Regiment and 8th Combined Special Naval Landing Force fought to delay the US advance while reinforcements could be dispatched. Over the course of several weeks, they delayed the US troops' westward advance on Munda and after an attempt to outflank their positions was defeated, began preparing for a counterattack. The objective of the Japanese counterattack was to destroy the American forces on New Georgia by attacking their exposed flank and rear areas. General Minoru Sasaki launched his counterattack at the moment that the US advance halted to reorganize, committing the 13th Infantry Regiment, under Colonel Tomonari Satoshi. The Japanese succeeded in infiltrating and attacking several isolated outposts in the American rear areas, but failed to inflict significant casualties on the American forces. The US forces were able to maintain communications with their supporting artillery battalions and called down heavy barrages in response, disrupting the attack. The beachhead area was also attacked, but a force of Marines ambushed the attackers moving from the command post, breaking up the attack. After the Japanese counterattack was defeated, the Americans and their allies captured the airfield in the Battle of Munda Point in early August.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia Campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia. The Americans landed reconnaissance elements around Zanana on New Georgia on 30 June. These were followed by main force elements on 2 July 1943, crossing from Rendova where they had landed on 30 June, and made limited gains in their drive toward Munda Point and advanced slowly against strong opposition. From the outset, the Japanese forces around Zanana, consisting largely of troops from the 229th Infantry Regiment and 8th Combined Special Naval Landing Force fought to delay the US advance while reinforcements could be dispatched. Over the course of several weeks, they delayed the US troops' westward advance on Munda and after an attempt to outflank their positions was defeated, began preparing for a counterattack. The objective of the Japanese counterattack was to destroy the American forces on New Georgia by attacking their exposed flank and rear areas. General Minoru Sasaki launched his counterattack at the moment that the US advance halted to reorganize, committing the 13th Infantry Regiment, under Colonel Tomonari Satoshi. The Japanese succeeded in infiltrating and attacking several isolated outposts in the American rear areas, but failed to inflict significant casualties on the American forces. The US forces were able to maintain communications with their supporting artillery battalions and called down heavy barrages in response, disrupting the attack. The beachhead area was also attacked, but a force of Marines ambushed the attackers moving from the command post, breaking up the attack. After the Japanese counterattack was defeated, the Americans and their allies captured the airfield in the Battle of Munda Point in early August.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the [New Georgia campaign]] in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese effort was ultimately unsucessful and in the wake of the attack the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive that ultimately captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese effort was ultimately unsucessful and in the wake of the attack the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive that ultimately captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese effort was ultimately unsuccessful and in the wake of the attack the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive that ultimately captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese attack saw one infantry regiment carry out a frontal assault against the center and left of the U.S. front line, while another carried out a flanking attack on their left. While the frontal assault was checked, the flanking attack succeeded in breaking into the rear of the U.S. beachhead. Many casualties were inflicted among the logistics, support and medical troops, and the 43rd Infantry Division's command post came under attack before heavy defensive artillery fire and local defensive fighting forced them back. Ultimately the Japanese attack unsuccessful and after a brief lull in the fighting, the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive a week later that captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese attack saw one infantry regiment from the Southeast Detachment carry out a frontal assault against the center and left of the U.S. front line, while another carried out a flanking attack on their left. While the frontal assault was checked, the flanking attack succeeded in breaking into the rear of the U.S. beachhead. Many casualties were inflicted among the logistics, support and medical troops, and the 43rd Infantry Division's command post came under attack before heavy defensive artillery fire and local defensive fighting forced them back. Ultimately the Japanese attack unsuccessful and after a brief lull in the fighting, the U.S. forces launched a corps-level offensive a week later that captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
  • The New Georgia counterattack was a counterattack on 17–18 July 1943 by mainly Imperial Japanese Army troops against United States Army forces during the New Georgia campaign in the Solomon Islands. The U.S. and its allies were attempting to capture an airfield constructed by the Japanese at Munda Point on New Georgia with which to support further advances towards the main Japanese base around Rabaul as part of Operation Cartwheel. The Japanese attack saw one infantry regiment from the Southeast Detachment carry out a frontal assault against the center and left of the U.S. front line, while another carried out a flanking attack on their left aimed at enveloping the U.S. forces and cutting them off from their supply line. While the frontal assault was checked, the flanking attack succeeded in breaking into the rear of the U.S. beachhead. Many casualties were inflicted among the logistics, support and medical troops in the area, and the 43rd Infantry Division's command post came under attack before heavy defensive artillery fire and local defensive fighting forced the Japanese attackers back. Ultimately, the Japanese attack was unsuccessful, having been badly coordinated, and after a brief lull in the fighting, the U.S. forces launched a two-week long corps-level offensive that captured the airfield on 4–5 August 1943.
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  • Allied victory
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  • 30,000
  • 8,000
  • 9,000
  • 3 infantry regiments
  • 2 infantry regiments (less one battalion)
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