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In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening parties, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year's Day, 1 January.

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  • New Year's Eve
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  • *
  • *วันสิ้นปี(Thailand)
  • วันสิ้นปี(Thailand)
  • {{วันสิ้นปี(Thailand)
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  • In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening parties, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year's Day, 1 January.
  • | duration = 1 day| frequency = Annual| observedby = People around the world| date = 31 December| scheduling = same day each year| celebrations = Reflection; late-night partying; family gatherings; feasting; gift exchanges; fireworks; countdowns; watchnight services; social gatherings, during which participants may dance, eat, consume alcoholic beverages, and watch or light fireworks| type = International| significance = The final day of the Gregorian year| relatedto = New Year's Day}}
  • {{Infobox holiday| holiday_name = New Year's Eve| image = Fanciful sketch by Marguerite Martyn of a New Years Eve celebration.jpg| caption = Fanciful sketch by reporter and artist Marguerite Martyn of a New Year's Eve celebration, from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch of 4 January 1914 | nickname = The Line Islands (part of Kiribati) and Tonga, are examples of the first places to welcome the New Year, while Baker Island (an uninhabited atoll part of the United States Minor Outlying Islands) and American Samoa are among the last.
  • | duration = 1 day| frequency = Annual| observedby = People around the world| date = 31 December| scheduling = same day each year| celebrations = Reflection; late-night partying; family gatherings; feasting; gift exchanges; fireworks; countdowns; watchnight services; social gatherings, during which participants may dance, eat, consume alcoholic beverages, and watch or light fireworks| type = International| significance = The final day of the Gregorian year| relatedto = New Year's Day, Christmas Day, Christmas Eve}}
rdfs:label
  • New Year's Eve
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has abstract
  • In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening parties, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year's Day, 1 January. Tonga and Kiritimati (Christmas Island), part of Kiribati, are examples of the first places to welcome the New Year while Baker Island in the United States of America and American Samoa are among the last.
  • In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening parties, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year's Day, 1 January. The Line Islands (part of Kiribati) and Tonga, are examples of the first places to welcome the New Year, while Baker Island (an uninhabited atoll part of the United States Minor Outlying Islands) and American Samoa are among the last.
  • | duration = 1 day| frequency = Annual| observedby = People around the world| date = 31 December| scheduling = same day each year| celebrations = Reflection; late-night partying; family gatherings; feasting; gift exchanges; fireworks; countdowns; watchnight services; social gatherings, during which participants may dance, eat, consume alcoholic beverages, and watch or light fireworks| type = International| significance = The final day of the Gregorian year| relatedto = New Year's Day}} In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening parties, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year's Day, 1 January. The Line Islands (part of Kiribati) and Tonga, are examples of the first places to welcome the New Year, while Baker Island (an uninhabited atoll part of the United States Minor Outlying Islands) and American Samoa are among the last.
  • {{Infobox holiday| holiday_name = New Year's Eve| image = Fanciful sketch by Marguerite Martyn of a New Years Eve celebration.jpg| caption = Fanciful sketch by reporter and artist Marguerite Martyn of a New Year's Eve celebration, from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch of 4 January 1914 | nickname = * Hogmanay (Scotland) * Calennig (Wales) * Ambang/Malam Tahun Baharu/Baru (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore) * Silvester (Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Switzerland) * Réveillon (Algeria, Angola, Brazil, France, Macau, Mozambique, Portugal, Romania, Wallonia, and French-speaking locations in North America) * Kanun Novogo Goda (Russia) * Ōmisoka (Japan) {{ (Thailand)| duration = 1 day| frequency = Annual| observedby = People around the world| date = 31 December| scheduling = same day each year| celebrations = Reflection; late-night partying; family gatherings; feasting; gift exchanges; fireworks; countdowns; watchnight services; social gatherings, during which participants may dance, eat, consume alcoholic beverages, and watch or light fireworks| type = International| significance = The final day of the Gregorian year| relatedto = New Year's Day}} In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening parties, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year's Day, 1 January. The Line Islands (part of Kiribati) and Tonga, are examples of the first places to welcome the New Year, while Baker Island (an uninhabited atoll part of the United States Minor Outlying Islands) and American Samoa are among the last.
  • | duration = 1 day| frequency = Annual| observedby = People around the world| date = 31 December| scheduling = same day each year| celebrations = Reflection; late-night partying; family gatherings; feasting; gift exchanges; fireworks; countdowns; watchnight services; social gatherings, during which participants may dance, eat, consume alcoholic beverages, and watch or light fireworks| type = International| significance = The final day of the Gregorian year| relatedto = New Year's Day, Christmas Day, Christmas Eve}} In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December. In many countries, New Year's Eve is celebrated at evening parties, where many people dance, eat, drink, and watch or light fireworks. Some Christians attend a watchnight service. The celebrations generally go on past midnight into New Year's Day, 1 January. The Line Islands (part of Kiribati) and Tonga, are examples of the first places to welcome the New Year, while Baker Island (an uninhabited atoll part of the United States Minor Outlying Islands) and American Samoa are among the last.
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  • The final day of theGregorianyear
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