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The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language (isiNdebele). The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele.

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  • Ndebele
  • Mthwakazians/Amahlabezulu/Amandebele ka Mzilikazi
  • Hlabezulu
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  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language (isiNdebele). The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language (isiNdebele). The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele.
  • The Northern Ndebele people are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group who are mostly found in Matabeleland or a pre colonial kingdom known as Mthwakazi and around Southern Africa,they are recognised officially in Zimbabwe where their population reaches 7 million as at 2020. Majority of them speak a language commonly known as isiNdebele which is the largest of the minority languages such as chiTonga,TshiVenda, TjiKalanga,chiNambya,seSotho,seTswana,XiShangaan and isiXhosa The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfec
  • The Northern Ndebele people/AbeThwakazi are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group who are mostly found in Matabeleland or a pre colonial kingdom known as Mthwakazi and around Southern Africa,they are recognised officially in Zimbabwe where their population reaches 7 million as at 2020. Majority of them speak a language commonly known as isiNdebele which is the largest of the minority languages such as chiTonga,TshiVenda, TjiKalanga,chiNambya,seSotho,seTswana,XiShangaan and isiXhosa The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long bef
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army,
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele and other 11 languages of the region/kingdom. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to Zulu,Kalanga and other culture incorporated in IIts integrated cultural system. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cow
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) represents a dialect pf Zulu Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assega
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) (represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short s
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short st
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short st
  • The Hlabezulu people(Northern Ndebele: amaHlabezulu; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiHlabezulu. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Hlabezulu and Ndebele[The Southern Ndebele were left using the given name but they settled there(presnt-day Pretotoria) way before King Mzilikazi's time, they migrated from present-day KZN known as Ndundzas along with two other clans] tribes and languages have existed for 185 years, 180 years in
  • The Hlabezulu (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiHlabezulu. The Hlabezulu were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribes and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Hlabezulu culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and sh
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa. They speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and sh
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa. They speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebetelele” derived from two words “thebe” meaning shield and “telele” meaning tall. This was in reference to the tall shields the Matebele used in combat as compared to the smaller Sotho-Tswana shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa. They speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebetelele derived from two words “thebe” meaning shield and “telele” meaning tall. This was in reference to the tall shields the Matebele used in combat as compared to the smaller Sotho-Tswana shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu
rdfs:label
  • Northern Ndebele people
has abstract
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language (isiNdebele). The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled abaNguni went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he was exiled into present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local , eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, who share a common Ndebele culture and Ndebele language (isiNdebele). The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled abaNguni went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he was exiled into present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local , eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled abaNguni went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he was exiled into present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local , eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled abaNguni went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local , eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled Ngunis went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local , eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled Ngunis went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local Rozvi, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled Ngunis went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local Rozvi, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group who are mostly found in Matabeleland or a pre colonial kingdom known as Mthwakazi and around Southern Africa,they are recognised officially in Zimbabwe where their population reaches 7 million as at 2020. Majority of them speak a language commonly known as isiNdebele which is the largest of the minority languages such as chiTonga,TshiVenda, TjiKalanga,chiNambya,seSotho,seTswana,XiShangaan and isiXhosa The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the Nguni of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai similar to that of King Shaka’s army, they were also called Matabele, which in isiNguni was easily pronounced as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele people began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former Shaka's general in Zulu Kingdom and an ally. Under his command the disgruntled Ngunis went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual Ndebele Kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he and his followers moved to North of Limpopo River and created a Ndebele Kingdom which they named u Mthwakazi a Kingdom which lies inner the boundaries of Limpopo River, Zambezi River and Munyati River now part of present-day Zimbabwe. where the Nguni forged unity with the locals and created a Kingdom which was sovereign until it lost its Sovereignity in 1893 during the First Matabele War ,where white Colonialists in accompany of 652 Shona batsmen from Mashonaland which was conquered in 1890 defeated the Ndebele army to pave the way of Rule by Conquest till today. Mthwakazi kingdom was founded in three(3) classes namely the Enhla,Zansi and Budlanondo/Holingubo .Enhla were 500 Nguni people who originally came from Zulu Kingdom,Zansi were people who Joined along the way especially in Transvaal areas now part of Pretoria, Mpumalanga,Limpopo where king Mzilikazi first established his Kingdom before being forced out by Boers.Lastly the Holingubo or Amahole were the local people found in the final Settlement of the kingdom,thats were Mzilikazi finally established Bulawayo as the capital and the centre for multi cultural diversity and a Symbol of National Unity.Holingubo people were the largest of all 2 groups,many of them adopted isiNdebele language as the mother language eventually both three classes became one Nation and young men sent to army in different regiments.KingMzilikazi named this Nation of Diverse Mthwakazi meaning "isizwe esithe sithwasa sabasikhulu"(A Nation which became big at its inception) this nation is also known as Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the present day Zimbabwe. In the course of the Integration, large numbers of local people and individuals were integrated into the Ndebele nation,many adopting the Ndebele language, the largest spoken language in Mthwakazi today and Ndebele culture which has been influenced by local cultures making it a diversified cultural Nation. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi,Venda,Tonga,Nambya,Kalanga ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group who are mostly found in Matabeleland or a pre colonial kingdom known as Mthwakazi and around Southern Africa,they are recognised officially in Zimbabwe where their population reaches 7 million as at 2020. Majority of them speak a language commonly known as isiNdebele which is the largest of the minority languages such as chiTonga,TshiVenda, TjiKalanga,chiNambya,seSotho,seTswana,XiShangaan and isiXhosa The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the Nguni of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai similar to that of King Shaka’s army, they were also called Matabele, which in isiNguni was easily pronounced as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele people began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former Shaka's general in Zulu Kingdom and an ally. Under his command the disgruntled Ngunis went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual Ndebele Kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he and his followers moved to North of Limpopo River and created a Ndebele Kingdom which they named u Mthwakazi a Kingdom which lies inner the boundaries of Limpopo River, Zambezi River and Munyati River now part of present-day Zimbabwe. where the Nguni forged unity with the locals and created a Kingdom which was sovereign until it lost its Sovereignity in 1893 during the First Matabele War ,where white Colonialists in accompany of 652 Shona batsmen from Mashonaland which was conquered in 1890 defeated the Ndebele army to pave the way of Rule by Conquest till today. Mthwakazi kingdom was founded in three(3) classes namely the Enhla,Zansi and Budlanondo/Holingubo .Enhla were 500 Nguni people who originally came from Zulu Kingdom,Zansi were people who Joined along the way especially in Transvaal areas now part of Pretoria, Mpumalanga,Limpopo where king Mzilikazi first established his Kingdom before being forced out by Boers.Lastly the Holingubo or Amahole were the local people found in the final Settlement of the kingdom,thats were Mzilikazi finally established Bulawayo as the capital and the centre for multi cultural diversity and a Symbol of National Unity.Budlanondo/Holi people were the largest of all 2 groups,many of them adopted isiNdebele language as the mother language eventually both three classes became one Nation and young men sent to army in different regiments.KingMzilikazi named this Nation of Diverse Mthwakazi meaning "isizwe esithe sithwasa sabasikhulu"(A Nation which became big at its inception) this nation is also known as Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the present day Zimbabwe. In the course of the Integration, large numbers of local people and individuals were integrated into the Ndebele nation,many adopting the Ndebele language, the largest spoken language in Mthwakazi today and Ndebele culture which has been influenced by local cultures making it a diversified cultural Nation. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi,Venda,Tonga,Nambya,Kalanga ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people/AbeThwakazi are a Bantu-speaking nation and ethnic group who are mostly found in Matabeleland or a pre colonial kingdom known as Mthwakazi and around Southern Africa,they are recognised officially in Zimbabwe where their population reaches 7 million as at 2020. Majority of them speak a language commonly known as isiNdebele which is the largest of the minority languages such as chiTonga,TshiVenda, TjiKalanga,chiNambya,seSotho,seTswana,XiShangaan and isiXhosa The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the Nguni of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai similar to that of King Shaka’s army, they were also called Matabele, which in isiNguni was easily pronounced as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele people began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former Shaka's general in Zulu Kingdom and an ally. Under his command the disgruntled Ngunis went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual Ndebele Kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he and his followers moved to North of Limpopo River and created a Ndebele Kingdom which they named u Mthwakazi a Kingdom which lies inner the boundaries of Limpopo River, Zambezi River and Munyati River now part of present-day Zimbabwe. where the Nguni forged unity with the locals and created a Kingdom which was sovereign until it lost its Sovereignity in 1893 during the First Matabele War ,where white Colonialists in accompany of 652 Shona batsmen from Mashonaland which was conquered in 1890 defeated the Ndebele army to pave the way of Rule by Conquest till today. Mthwakazi kingdom was founded in three(3) classes namely the Enhla,Zansi and Budlanondo/Holingubo .Enhla were 500 Nguni people who originally came from Zulu Kingdom,Zansi were people who Joined along the way especially in Transvaal areas now part of Pretoria, Mpumalanga,Limpopo where king Mzilikazi first established his Kingdom before being forced out by Boers.Lastly the Holingubo or Amahole were the local people found in the final Settlement of the kingdom,thats were Mzilikazi finally established Bulawayo as the capital and the centre for multi cultural diversity and a Symbol of National Unity.Budlanondo/Holi people were the largest of all 2 groups,many of them adopted isiNdebele language as the mother language eventually both three classes became one Nation and young men sent to army in different regiments.KingMzilikazi named this Nation of Diverse Mthwakazi meaning "isizwe esithe sithwasa sabasikhulu"(A Nation which became big at its inception) this nation is also known as Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the present day Zimbabwe. In the course of the Integration, large numbers of local people and individuals were integrated into the Ndebele nation,many adopting the Ndebele language, the largest spoken language in Mthwakazi today and Ndebele culture which has been influenced by local cultures making it a diversified cultural Nation. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi,Venda,Tonga,Nambya,Kalanga ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. Under his command the disgruntled Ngunis went on to conquer and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the local Rozvi, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of conquered local clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele nation, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele and other 11 languages of the region/kingdom. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to Zulu,Kalanga and other culture incorporated in IIts integrated cultural system. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the integrated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele and other 11 languages of the region/kingdom. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to Zulu,Kalanga and other culture incorporated in IIts integrated cultural system. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka's army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the integrated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) represents a dialect pf Zulu Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele) (represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka’s army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or “the crushing’, Mzilikazi’s regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka's army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka's army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Hlabezulu people(Northern Ndebele: amaHlabezulu; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiHlabezulu. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Hlabezulu and Ndebele[The Southern Ndebele were left using the given name but they settled there(presnt-day Pretotoria) way before King Mzilikazi's time, they migrated from present-day KZN known as Ndundzas along with two other clans] tribes and languages have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Hlabezulu culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. The history of the Hlabezulus began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however he chose to keep the cattle from the raid and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name Matebele(Ndebele) and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Hlabezulus overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland by the British but named "KoMthwakazi" by King Mzilikazi KaMatshobana and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Hlabezulu tribe, adopting the Hlabezulu language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Hlabezulu (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiHlabezulu. The Hlabezulu were historically referred to as the Matebele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Matebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribes and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Hlabezulu culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. The history of the Hlabezulus began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa, they speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka's army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa. They speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebele, indicating people who sheltered behind tall cowhide shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka's army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa. They speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebetelele” derived from two words “thebe” meaning shield and “telele” meaning tall. This was in reference to the tall shields the Matebele used in combat as compared to the smaller Sotho-Tswana shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka's army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
  • The Northern Ndebele people (Northern Ndebele: amaNdebele; represents a dialect of Zulu in Zimbabwe) are a Bantu ethnic group in Southern Africa. They speak a language called isiNdebele. The Northern Ndebele were historically referred to as the Matabele which derives from the Sesotho expression thebetelele derived from two words “thebe” meaning shield and “telele” meaning tall. This was in reference to the tall shields the Matebele used in combat as compared to the smaller Sotho-Tswana shields. The term Bathebele was applied to at least two Nguni-speaking groups who settled in the region later called the Transvaal, long before the Mfecane. Both the Ndebele tribe and language have existed for 185 years, 180 years in Zimbabwe. The Ndebele culture and language is highly similar to their Zulu origin and ancestry in KZN province of South Africa. Although the amaNdebele of Mzilikazi used the much smaller cowhide shields and short stabbing assegai of King Shaka's army, they also were called Bathebele, which in isiNguni was rendered as amaNdebele. The history of the Northern Ndebele began when a Nguni group split from King Shaka in the early 19th century under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former chief in his kingdom and ally. He was sent to raid cattle up in the North and however hijacked the plan and continued on to raid and rule the chiefdoms of the Southern Ndebele. This was where the name and identity of the eventual kingdom was adopted. During a turbulent period in Nguni and Sotho-Tswana history known as the Mfecane or "the crushing", Mzilikazi's regiment, initially numbering 500 soldiers, moved west towards the present-day city of Pretoria, where they founded a settlement called Mhlahlandlela. The Great Trek in 1838 saw Mzilikazi defeated by the Voortrekkers at after which he moved to present-day Zimbabwe where the Ndebele overwhelmed the indigenous Rozvi which was already crumbling on leadership squabbles after the death of Changamire Dombo, eventually carving out a home now called Matabeleland and encompassing the west and southwest region of the country. In the course of the migration, large numbers of raided indigenous clans and individuals were absorbed into the Ndebele tribe, adopting the Ndebele language and culture. Historically the assimilated people came from the Southern Ndebele, Swazi, Sotho-Tswana, and Rozvi ethnic groups.
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