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Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 to 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight recovered teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of the teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was described by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. Ostafrikasaurus's generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former

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  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 to 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight recovered teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of the teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was described by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. Ostafrikasaurus's generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur currently placed in the family Spinosauridae from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 to 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight recovered teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of the teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was described by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. Ostafrikasaurus's generic name comes from the Ger
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight recovered teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of the teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was described by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. Ostafrikasaurus's generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the forme
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of these teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was named by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. The generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former name of the colony in wh
  • my dinoOstafasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of these teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was named by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. The generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former name of the colony i
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of these teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was named by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, with one tooth as the holotype, and the other referred to the same species. The generic name comes from the German word for German East Africa, the former name of the colony in which the fossils
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  • Ostafrikasaurus
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  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 to 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight recovered teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of the teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was described by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. Ostafrikasaurus's generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former name of the colony in which the fossils were found, while the specific name comes from the Latin words for "thick" and "serrated", in reference to the form of the animal's teeth. Ostafrikasaurus has been estimated at possibly 8.4 metres (28 ft) long and weighing 1.15 tonnes (2,500 lb). The holotype tooth is 46 millimetres (1.8 in) long, has a curved front edge, and is oval-shaped in cross section. The tooth shows serrations that—for spinosaur standards—are unusually large, more so than in any other known taxon. Both the front and back cutting edges are serrated, with two to four denticles per millimetre (0.04 in). The tooth also has longitudinal ridges on both sides, and the outermost enamel layer has a wrinkled texture in the regions between and without ridges. Among the oldest known spinosaurid fossils and the earliest named member of the family, Ostafrikasaurus is important in understanding the evolutionary origins of spinosaurids and their anatomical adaptations. From comparisons with its later relatives, Ostafrikasaurus indicates that spinosaur teeth became more conical and lost their serrations throughout their evolution. This is possibly a result of becoming more specialized for a piscivorous (fish-eating) diet, as has been suggested for the group, based on fossil evidence and the semiaquatic adaptations exhibited by many spinosaurid species. They are also known to have fed on pterosaurs and other dinosaurs. Ostafrikasaurus lived in a subtropical to tropical environment alongside many other dinosaurs, as well as pterosaurs, crocodyliforms, fish, small mammals, and numerous invertebrates. Due to its age and location, Ostafrikasaurus indicates spinosaurids may have been globally distributed prior to the breakup of Pangaea, as is also suggested by the group's presence in the Early Cretaceous of Asia.
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur currently placed in the family Spinosauridae from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 to 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight recovered teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of the teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was described by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. Ostafrikasaurus's generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former name of the colony in which the fossils were found, while the specific name comes from the Latin words for "thick" and "serrated", in reference to the form of the animal's teeth. Ostafrikasaurus has been estimated at possibly 8.4 metres (28 ft) long and weighing 1.15 tonnes (2,500 lb). The holotype tooth is 46 millimetres (1.8 in) long, has a curved front edge, and is oval-shaped in cross section. The tooth shows serrations that—for spinosaur standards—are unusually large, more so than in any other known taxon. Both the front and back cutting edges are serrated, with two to four denticles per millimetre (0.04 in). The tooth also has longitudinal ridges on both sides, and the outermost enamel layer has a wrinkled texture in the regions between and without ridges. Among the oldest known spinosaurid fossils and the earliest named member of the family, Ostafrikasaurus is important in understanding the evolutionary origins of spinosaurids and their anatomical adaptations. From comparisons with its later relatives, Ostafrikasaurus indicates that spinosaur teeth became more conical and lost their serrations throughout their evolution. This is possibly a result of becoming more specialized for a piscivorous (fish-eating) diet, as has been suggested for the group, based on fossil evidence and the semiaquatic adaptations exhibited by many spinosaurid species. They are also known to have fed on pterosaurs and other dinosaurs. Ostafrikasaurus lived in a subtropical to tropical environment alongside many other dinosaurs, as well as pterosaurs, crocodyliforms, fish, small mammals, and numerous invertebrates. Due to its age and location, Ostafrikasaurus indicates spinosaurids may have been globally distributed prior to the breakup of Pangaea, as is also suggested by the group's presence in the Early Cretaceous of Asia.
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight recovered teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of the teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was described by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. Ostafrikasaurus's generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former name of the colony in which the fossils were found, while the specific name comes from the Latin words for "thick" and "serrated", in reference to the form of the animal's teeth. Ostafrikasaurus has been estimated at possibly 8.4 metres (28 ft) long and weighing 1.15 tonnes (2,500 lb). The holotype tooth is 46 millimetres (1.8 in) long, has a curved front edge, and is oval-shaped in cross section. The tooth shows serrations that—for spinosaur standards—are unusually large, more so than in any other known taxon. Both the front and back cutting edges are serrated, with two to four denticles per millimetre (0.04 in). The tooth also has longitudinal ridges on both sides, and the outermost enamel layer has a wrinkled texture in the regions between and without ridges. Among the oldest known spinosaurid fossils and the earliest named member of the family, Ostafrikasaurus is important in understanding the evolutionary origins of spinosaurids and their anatomical adaptations. From comparisons with its later relatives, Ostafrikasaurus indicates that spinosaur teeth became more conical and lost their serrations throughout their evolution. This is possibly a result of becoming more specialized for a piscivorous (fish-eating) diet, as has been suggested for the group, based on fossil evidence and the semiaquatic adaptations exhibited by many spinosaurid species. They are also known to have fed on pterosaurs and other dinosaurs. Ostafrikasaurus lived in a subtropical to tropical environment alongside many other dinosaurs, as well as pterosaurs, crocodyliforms, fish, small mammals, and numerous invertebrates. Due to its age and location, Ostafrikasaurus indicates spinosaurids may have been globally distributed prior to the breakup of Pangaea, as is also suggested by the group's presence in the Early Cretaceous of Asia.
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of these teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was named by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. The generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former name of the colony in which the fossils were found, while the specific name comes from the Latin words for "thick" and "serrated", in reference to the form of the animal's teeth. Ostafrikasaurus has been tentatively estimated at 8.4 metres (28 ft) long and weighing 1.15 tonnes (2,500 lb). The holotype tooth is 46 millimetres (1.8 in) long, has a curved front edge, and is oval-shaped in cross section. The tooth shows serrations that—for spinosaur standards—are unusually large, more so than in any other known taxon. Both the front and back cutting edges are serrated, with two to four denticles per millimetre (0.04 in). The tooth also has longitudinal ridges on both sides, and the outermost enamel layer has a wrinkled texture in the regions between and without ridges. Among the oldest known spinosaurid fossils and the earliest named member of the family, Ostafrikasaurus may be of importance in understanding the evolutionary origins of spinosaurids and their anatomical adaptations. From comparisons with its later relatives, Ostafrikasaurus indicates that spinosaur teeth became more conical and lost their serrations throughout their evolution. This is possibly a result of becoming more specialized for a piscivorous (fish-eating) diet, as has been suggested for the group, based on fossil evidence and the semiaquatic adaptations exhibited by many spinosaurid species. They are also known to have fed on pterosaurs and other dinosaurs. Ostafrikasaurus lived in a subtropical to tropical environment alongside many other dinosaurs, as well as pterosaurs, crocodyliforms, fish, small mammals, and numerous invertebrates. Due to its age and location, Ostafrikasaurus indicates spinosaurids may have been globally distributed prior to the breakup of Pangaea, as is also suggested by the group's presence in the Early Cretaceous of Asia.
  • my dinoOstafasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of these teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was named by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, who used one tooth as the holotype specimen, and referred the other to the same species. The generic name comes from the German word for "German East Africa", the former name of the colony in which the fossils were found, while the specific name comes from the Latin words for "thick" and "serrated", in reference to the form of the animal's teeth. Ostafrikasaurus has been tentatively estimated at 8.4 metres (28 ft) long and weighing 1.15 tonnes (2,500 lb). The holotype tooth is 46 millimetres (1.8 in) long, has a curved front edge, and is oval-shaped in cross section. The tooth shows serrations that—for spinosaur standards—are unusually large, more so than in any other known taxon. Both the front and back cutting edges are serrated, with two to four denticles per millimetre (0.04 in). The tooth also has longitudinal ridges on both sides, and the outermost enamel layer has a wrinkled texture in the regions between and without ridges. Among the oldest known spinosaurid fossils and the earliest named member of the family, Ostafrikasaurus may be of importance in understanding the evolutionary origins of spinosaurids and their anatomical adaptations. From comparisons with its later relatives, Ostafrikasaurus indicates that spinosaur teeth became more conical and lost their serrations throughout their evolution. This is possibly a result of becoming more specialized for a piscivorous (fish-eating) diet, as has been suggested for the group, based on fossil evidence and the semiaquatic adaptations exhibited by many spinosaurid species. They are also known to have fed on pterosaurs and other dinosaurs. Ostafrikasaurus lived in a subtropical to tropical environment alongside many other dinosaurs, as well as pterosaurs, crocodyliforms, fish, small mammals, and numerous invertebrates. Due to its age and location, Ostafrikasaurus indicates spinosaurids may have been globally distributed prior to the breakup of Pangaea, as is also suggested by the group's presence in the Early Cretaceous of Asia.
  • Ostafrikasaurus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of what is now Tanzania. It is known only from fossil teeth discovered sometime between 1909 and 1912, during an expedition to the Tendaguru Formation by the Natural History Museum of Berlin. Eight teeth were originally attributed to the dubious dinosaur genus Labrosaurus, and later to Ceratosaurus, both known from the North American Morrison Formation. Subsequent studies attributed two of these teeth to a spinosaurid dinosaur, and in 2012, Ostafrikasaurus crassiserratus was named by French palaeontologist Eric Buffetaut, with one tooth as the holotype, and the other referred to the same species. The generic name comes from the German word for German East Africa, the former name of the colony in which the fossils were found, while the specific name comes from the Latin words for "thick" and "serrated", in reference to the form of the animal's teeth. Ostafrikasaurus has been tentatively estimated at 8.4 metres (28 feet) long and weighing 1.15 tonnes (1.27 short tons; 1.13 long tons). The holotype tooth is 46 millimetres (1.8 inches) long, has a curved front edge, and is oval-shaped in cross section. The tooth shows serrations that—for spinosaur standards—are unusually large, more so than in any other known taxon. Both the front and back cutting edges are serrated, with two to four denticles per mm (0.04 in). The tooth also has longitudinal ridges on both sides, and the outermost enamel layer has a wrinkled texture in the regions between and without ridges. Among the oldest known spinosaurid fossils, Ostafrikasaurus may be of importance in understanding the evolutionary origins of spinosaurids and their anatomical adaptations. From comparisons with its later relatives, Ostafrikasaurus indicates that spinosaur teeth became more conical and lost their serrations throughout their evolution. This is possibly a result of becoming more specialized for a piscivorous (fish-eating) diet, as has been suggested for the family based on fossil evidence and the semiaquatic adaptations exhibited by many species. They are also known to have fed on pterosaurs and other dinosaurs. Ostafrikasaurus lived in a subtropical to tropical environment alongside many other dinosaurs, as well as pterosaurs, crocodyliforms, fish, mammals, and invertebrates. Due to its age and location, Ostafrikasaurus indicates spinosaurids may have been globally distributed prior to the breakup of Pangaea.
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