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The Penshaw Monument (), officially The Earl of Durham's Monument, was built in 1844 on Penshaw Hill between the districts of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring, now within the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack.

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  • The Penshaw Monument (), officially The Earl of Durham's Monument, was built in 1844 on Penshaw Hill between the districts of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring, now within the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack.
  • Penshaw Monument (), officially The Earl of Durham's Monument, is a monument in the style of a Doric temple on Penshaw Hill, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the City of Sunderland, North East England. Built in 1844, it is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack.
  • Penshaw Monument (), officially The Earl of Durham's Monument, is a monument in the style of a Doric temple on Penshaw Hill, between the area of[[Washington, ] and Houghton-le-Spring in the City of Sunderland, North East England. Built in 1844, it is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack.
  • Penshaw Monument (), or The Earl of Durham's Monument, is a monument in the style of a Doric temple on Penshaw Hill, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the City of Sunderland, North East England. Built in 1844, it is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is located near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built in 1844 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built in 1844 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham Report on the future governance of the American territories. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument.
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  • Penshaw Monument
has abstract
  • The Penshaw Monument (), officially The Earl of Durham's Monument, was built in 1844 on Penshaw Hill between the districts of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring, now within the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack. Penshaw Monument was built as a memorial to John Lambton's work on the Durham report which was commissioned by Lord Melbourne in 1838 to seek direction on how best the British Empire should manage its colonies around the globe. The report recommended nearly complete self governance for advanced colonies and became one of the most important documents in the whole of the British Empire, formulating a new relationship between London and the colonies.
  • Penshaw Monument (), officially The Earl of Durham's Monument, is a monument in the style of a Doric temple on Penshaw Hill, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the City of Sunderland, North East England. Built in 1844, it is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack. Penshaw Monument was built as a memorial to John Lambton's work on the Durham report which was commissioned by Lord Melbourne in 1838 to seek direction on how best the British Empire should manage its colonies around the globe. The report recommended nearly complete self governance for advanced colonies and became one of the most important documents in the whole of the British Empire, formulating a new relationship between London and the colonies.
  • Penshaw Monument (), officially The Earl of Durham's Monument, is a monument in the style of a Doric temple on Penshaw Hill, between the area of[[Washington, ] and Houghton-le-Spring in the City of Sunderland, North East England. Built in 1844, it is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack. Penshaw Monument was built as a memorial to John Lambton's work on the Durham report which was commissioned by Lord Melbourne in 1838 to seek direction on how best the British Empire should manage its colonies around the globe. The report recommended nearly complete self governance for advanced colonies and became one of the most important documents in the whole of the British Empire, formulating a new relationship between London and the colonies.
  • Penshaw Monument (), or The Earl of Durham's Monument, is a monument in the style of a Doric temple on Penshaw Hill, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the City of Sunderland, North East England. Built in 1844, it is dedicated to John George Lambton (1792–1840), 1st Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, affectionately known as Radical Jack. Penshaw Monument was built as a memorial to John Lambton's work on the Durham report which was commissioned by Lord Melbourne in 1838 to seek direction on how best the British Empire should manage its colonies around the globe. The report recommended nearly complete self governance for advanced colonies and became one of the most important documents in the whole of the British Empire, formulating a new relationship between London and the colonies.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is located near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built in 1844 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument; it was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella. One of its columns contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the structure's entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the monument; the National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. The monument fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is now often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, but critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose. The structure features no depiction of the man it commemorates, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is located near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built in 1844 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument; it was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella. One of its columns contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the structure's entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the monument; The monument fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is now often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, but critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose. The structure features no depiction of the man it commemorates, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is located near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built in 1844 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument; it was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella. One of its columns contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the monument. The structure fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is now often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, but critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose. The structure features no depiction of the man it commemorates, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built in 1844 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument. It was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone at a cost of around £6000; the money was raised by subscription. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella (inner chamber). One column contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the top of the monument. The structure fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, especially when seen from a distance, but critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose. It features no depiction of the man it honours, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument. It was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone at a cost of around £6000; the money was raised by subscription. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella (inner chamber). One column contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the top of the monument. The structure fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, especially when seen from a distance, but critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose. It features no depiction of the man it honours, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an Ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument. It was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone at a cost of around £6000; the money was raised by subscription. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella (inner chamber). One column contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the top of the monument. The structure fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, especially when seen from a distance. However, critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose; nineteenth-century architectural journals condemned its lack of a roof and the hollowness of its columns and walls. It features no depiction of the man it honours, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument. It was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone at a cost of around £6000; the money was raised by subscription. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella (inner chamber). One column contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the top of the monument. The structure fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, especially when seen from a distance. However, critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose; nineteenth-century architectural journals condemned its lack of a roof and the hollowness of its columns and walls. It features no depiction of the man it honours, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham report. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. John and Benjamin Green designed Penshaw Monument. It was built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone at a cost of around £6,000; the money was raised by subscription. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella (inner chamber). One column contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the top of the monument. The structure fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, especially when seen from a distance. However, critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose; nineteenth-century architectural journals condemned its lack of a roof and the hollowness of its columns and walls. It features no depiction of the man it honours, and has been widely described as a folly.
  • Penshaw Monument (locally ) is a memorial in the style of an ancient Greek temple on Penshaw Hill in the City of Sunderland, North East England. It is near the village of Penshaw, between the towns of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the historic County Durham. The monument was built between 1844 and 1845 to commemorate John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (1792–1840), Governor-General of British North America and author of the Durham Report on the future governance of the American territories. Owned by the National Trust since 1939, it is a Grade I listed building under the name of the Earl of Durham's Monument. The monument was designed by John and Benjamin Green and built by Thomas Pratt of Bishopwearmouth using local gritstone at a cost of around £6000; the money was raised by subscription. On 28 August 1844, while it was partially complete, its foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in a Masonic ceremony which drew tens of thousands of spectators. Based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, it is a tetrastyle temple of the Doric order, with eighteen columns—seven along its longer sides and four along its shorter ones—and no roof or cella (inner chamber). One column contains a spiral staircase leading to a parapeted walkway along the entablature. This staircase was closed to the public in 1926 after a 15-year-old boy fell to his death from the top of the monument. The structure fell into disrepair in the 1930s and was fenced off, then repaired in 1939. It has since undergone further restoration, including extensive work in 1979 during which its western side was dismantled. Floodlit at night since 1988, it is often illuminated in different colours to mark special occasions. The National Trust began to offer supervised tours of the walkway in 2011. Penshaw Monument is a local landmark, visible from up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) away. It appears on the crest of Sunderland A.F.C. and is viewed nationally as a symbol of the North East. It has been praised for the grandeur, simplicity and symbolic significance of its design, especially when seen from a distance. However, critics have said it is poorly constructed and lacks purpose; nineteenth-century architectural journals condemned its lack of a roof and the hollowness of its columns and walls. It features no depiction of the man it honours, and has been widely described as a folly.
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