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Post-anarchism or postanarchism is an anarchist philosophy that employs post-structuralist and postmodernist approaches (the term post-structuralist anarchism is used as well, so as not to suggest having moved beyond anarchism). Post-anarchism is not a single coherent theory, but rather refers to the combined works of any number of post-modernists and post-structuralists such as Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard; postmodern feminists such as Judith Butler; and alongside those of classical anarchist and libertarian philosophers such as Zhuang Zhou, Emma Goldman, Max Stirner, and Friedrich Nietzsche. Thus, the terminology can vary widely in both approach and outcome.

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  • Post-anarchism or postanarchism is an anarchist philosophy that employs post-structuralist and postmodernist approaches (the term post-structuralist anarchism is used as well, so as not to suggest having moved beyond anarchism). Post-anarchism is not a single coherent theory, but rather refers to the combined works of any number of post-modernists and post-structuralists such as Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard; postmodern feminists such as Judith Butler; and alongside those of classical anarchist and libertarian philosophers such as Zhuang Zhou, Emma Goldman, Max Stirner, and Friedrich Nietzsche. Thus, the terminology can vary widely in both approach and outcome.
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  • Post-anarchism
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  • Post-anarchism or postanarchism is an anarchist philosophy that employs post-structuralist and postmodernist approaches (the term post-structuralist anarchism is used as well, so as not to suggest having moved beyond anarchism). Post-anarchism is not a single coherent theory, but rather refers to the combined works of any number of post-modernists and post-structuralists such as Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard; postmodern feminists such as Judith Butler; and alongside those of classical anarchist and libertarian philosophers such as Zhuang Zhou, Emma Goldman, Max Stirner, and Friedrich Nietzsche. Thus, the terminology can vary widely in both approach and outcome. The various approaches and imprecision of the term illustrate anarchism's own general rejection of dogma and complex history. However, some specifics offered by Saul Newman suggest a growing coherence. In his 2015 book, Postanarchism, he defines postanarchism as, "an anarchism understood not as [a] certain set of social arrangements, or even as a particular revolutionary project, but rather as a sensibility, a certain ethos or way of living and seeing the world which is impelled by the realization of the freedom that one already has." In this definition, postanarchism draws on the revolutionary elan of anarchism, but operates apart from its focus on the eradication of the state. Ruth Kinna, in her review of Newman's book, wrote that, "anarchism [has largely been defined] as a program of action, an idea of social revolution and a conception of the stateless society, whereas [Newman's] postanarchism is associated with autonomous modes of thinking and acting – Foucault's 'decisive will to not be governed' – and the renunciation of revolution."
  • Post-anarchism or postanarchism is an anarchist philosophy that employs post-structuralist and postmodernist approaches (the term post-structuralist anarchism is used as well, so as not to suggest having moved beyond anarchism). Post-anarchism is not a single coherent theory, but rather refers to the combined works of any number of post-modernists and post-structuralists such as Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard; postmodern feminists such as Judith Butler; and alongside those of classical anarchist and libertarian philosophers such as Zhuang Zhou, Emma Goldman, Max Stirner, and Friedrich Nietzsche. Thus, the terminology can vary widely in both approach and outcome. The various approaches and imprecision of the term illustrate anarchism's own general rejection of dogma and complex history. However, some specifics offered by Saul Newman suggest a growing coherence. In his 2015 book Postanarchism, he defines postanarchism as, "an anarchism understood not as [a] certain set of social arrangements, or even as a particular revolutionary project, but rather as a sensibility, a certain ethos or way of living and seeing the world which is impelled by the realization of the freedom that one already has." In this definition, postanarchism draws on the revolutionary elan of anarchism, but operates apart from its focus on the eradication of the state. Ruth Kinna, in her review of Newman's book, wrote that, "anarchism [has largely been defined] as a program of action, an idea of social revolution and a conception of the stateless society, whereas [Newman's] postanarchism is associated with autonomous modes of thinking and acting – Foucault's 'decisive will to not be governed' – and the renunciation of revolution."
  • Post-anarchism or postanarchism is an anarchist philosophy that employs post-structuralist and postmodernist approaches (the term post-structuralist anarchism is used as well, so as not to suggest having moved beyond anarchism). Post-anarchism is not a single coherent theory, but rather refers to the combined works of any number of post-modernists and post-structuralists such as Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard; postmodern feminists such as Judith Butler; and alongside those of classical anarchist and libertarian philosophers such as Zhuang Zhou, Emma Goldman, Max Stirner, and Friedrich Nietzsche. Thus, the terminology can vary widely in both approach and outcome. The various approaches and imprecision of the term illustrate anarchism's own general rejection of dogma and complex history. However, some specifics offered by Saul Newman suggest a growing coherence. In his 2015 book Postanarchism, he defines postanarchism as "an anarchism understood not as [a] certain set of social arrangements, or even as a particular revolutionary project, but rather as a sensibility, a certain ethos or way of living and seeing the world which is impelled by the realization of the freedom that one already has." In this definition, postanarchism draws on the revolutionary elan of anarchism, but operates apart from its focus on the eradication of the state. Ruth Kinna, in her review of Newman's book, wrote that, "anarchism [has largely been defined] as a program of action, an idea of social revolution and a conception of the stateless society, whereas [Newman's] postanarchism is associated with autonomous modes of thinking and acting – Foucault's 'decisive will to not be governed' – and the renunciation of revolution."
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