About: Samuel T. Francis     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : yago:TheWashingtonTimesPeople, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FSamuel_T._Francis

Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947–February 15, 2005), known as Sam Francis, was an American columnist and writer. He was a columnist and editor for the conservative Washington Times until he was dismissed after making allegedly racist remarks at the 1995 conference of the group American Renaissance. Francis would later become a "dominant force" on the Council of Conservative Citizens, an anti-black, anti-immigrant group that espoused racism. Francis was chief editor of the council's newsletter, Citizens Informer, until his death in 2005.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
rdfs:comment
  • Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947–February 15, 2005), known as Sam Francis, was an American columnist and writer. He was a columnist and editor for the conservative Washington Times until he was dismissed after making allegedly racist remarks at the 1995 conference of the group American Renaissance. Francis would later become a "dominant force" on the Council of Conservative Citizens, an anti-black, anti-immigrant group that espoused racism. Francis was chief editor of the council's newsletter, Citizens Informer, until his death in 2005.
  • Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947–February 15, 2005), known as Sam Francis, was an American columnist and writer. He was a columnist and editor for the conservative Washington Times until he was dismissed after making allegedly racist remarks at the 1995 conference of the American Renaissance. Francis would later become a "dominant force" on the Council of Conservative Citizens, an anti-black, anti-immigrant group that espoused racism. Francis was chief editor of the council's newsletter, Citizens Informer, until his death in 2005.
  • Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947–February 15, 2005), known as Sam Francis, was an American columnist and writer. He was a columnist and editor for the conservative Washington Times until he was dismissed after making allegedly racist remarks at the 1995 conference of the American Renaissance. Francis would later become a "dominant force" on the Council of Conservative Citizens. Francis was chief editor of the council's newsletter, Citizens Informer, until his death in 2005.
rdfs:label
  • Samuel T. Francis
has abstract
  • Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947–February 15, 2005), known as Sam Francis, was an American columnist and writer. He was a columnist and editor for the conservative Washington Times until he was dismissed after making allegedly racist remarks at the 1995 conference of the group American Renaissance. Francis would later become a "dominant force" on the Council of Conservative Citizens, an anti-black, anti-immigrant group that espoused racism. Francis was chief editor of the council's newsletter, Citizens Informer, until his death in 2005. Political scientist and writer George Michael, an expert on extremism, identified Francis as one of "the far right's higher-caliber intellectuals". The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist groups, described Francis as an important white nationalist writer known for his "ubiquitous presence of his columns in racist forums and his influence over the general direction of right-wing extremism" in the United States. Analyst Leonard Zeskind called Francis the "philosopher king" of the radical right, writing that "By any measure, Francis's white nationalism was as subtle as an eight-pound hammer pounding on a twelve inch I beam." Scholar Chip Berlet described Francis as an ultraconservative ideologue akin to Pat Buchanan, to whom Francis was an advisor. Hans-Hermann Hoppe called Francis "one of the leading theoreticians and strategists of the Buchananite movement". To Jared Taylor "Francis was the premier philosopher of white racial consciousness of our time".
  • Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947–February 15, 2005), known as Sam Francis, was an American columnist and writer. He was a columnist and editor for the conservative Washington Times until he was dismissed after making allegedly racist remarks at the 1995 conference of the American Renaissance. Francis would later become a "dominant force" on the Council of Conservative Citizens, an anti-black, anti-immigrant group that espoused racism. Francis was chief editor of the council's newsletter, Citizens Informer, until his death in 2005. Political scientist and writer George Michael, an expert on extremism, identified Francis as one of "the far right's higher-caliber intellectuals". The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist groups, described Francis as an important white nationalist writer known for his "ubiquitous presence of his columns in racist forums and his influence over the general direction of right-wing extremism" in the United States. Analyst Leonard Zeskind called Francis the "philosopher king" of the radical right, writing that "By any measure, Francis's white nationalism was as subtle as an eight-pound hammer pounding on a twelve inch I beam." Scholar Chip Berlet described Francis as an ultraconservative ideologue akin to Pat Buchanan, to whom Francis was an advisor. Hans-Hermann Hoppe called Francis "one of the leading theoreticians and strategists of the Buchananite movement". To Jared Taylor "Francis was the premier philosopher of white racial consciousness of our time".
  • Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947–February 15, 2005), known as Sam Francis, was an American columnist and writer. He was a columnist and editor for the conservative Washington Times until he was dismissed after making allegedly racist remarks at the 1995 conference of the American Renaissance. Francis would later become a "dominant force" on the Council of Conservative Citizens. Francis was chief editor of the council's newsletter, Citizens Informer, until his death in 2005. Political scientist and writer George Michael, an expert on extremism, identified Francis as one of "the far right's higher-caliber intellectuals". The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist groups, described Francis as an important white nationalist writer known for his "ubiquitous presence of his columns in racist forums and his influence over the general direction of right-wing extremism" in the United States. Analyst Leonard Zeskind called Francis the "philosopher king" of the radical right, writing that "By any measure, Francis's white nationalism was as subtle as an eight-pound hammer pounding on a twelve inch I beam." Scholar Chip Berlet described Francis as an ultraconservative ideologue akin to Pat Buchanan, to whom Francis was an advisor. Hans-Hermann Hoppe called Francis "one of the leading theoreticians and strategists of the Buchananite movement". To Jared Taylor "Francis was the premier philosopher of white racial consciousness of our time".
alma mater
birth date
birth name
  • Samuel Todd Francis
birth place
birth year
death date
death place
death year
occupation
resting place
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
Link from a Wikipage to an external page
extraction datetime
Link to the Wikipage history URL
Wikipage page ID
page length (characters) of wiki page
Wikipage modification datetime
Wiki page out degree
Wikipage revision ID
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Sep 1 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2020 OpenLink Software