About: Schuster Line     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : owl:Thing, within Data Space : dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia-live.openlinksw.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FSchuster_Line

The Schuster Line (Luxembourgish: Schuster-Linn) was a line of barriers and barricades erected by the Luxembourg government along its borders with Germany and France shortly before World War II. The line was named after Joseph Schuster, Luxembourg's chief engineer of bridges and highways, who was responsible for its construction. The line failed significantly to slow the German advance during the invasion of Luxembourg on 10 May 1940. The iron gates were knocked down and ramps were built over the concrete blockades to drive over them; some were blown up.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
thumbnail
sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
rdfs:comment
  • The Schuster Line (Luxembourgish: Schuster-Linn) was a line of barriers and barricades erected by the Luxembourg government along its borders with Germany and France shortly before World War II. The line was named after Joseph Schuster, Luxembourg's chief engineer of bridges and highways, who was responsible for its construction. The line failed significantly to slow the German advance during the invasion of Luxembourg on 10 May 1940. The iron gates were knocked down and ramps were built over the concrete blockades to drive over them; some were blown up.
rdfs:label
  • Schuster Line
has abstract
  • The Schuster Line (Luxembourgish: Schuster-Linn) was a line of barriers and barricades erected by the Luxembourg government along its borders with Germany and France shortly before World War II. The line was named after Joseph Schuster, Luxembourg's chief engineer of bridges and highways, who was responsible for its construction. The Schuster Line consisted of 41 sets of concrete blocks and iron gates; 18 bridgeblocks on the German border, and five roadblocks on the French border. The roadblocks were set up a mile inland in a zigzag pattern, covered by barbed wire entanglements on either side. Nine radio outposts were erected along the German border, with a central receiving station in the St Espirit barracks in the capital. The line failed significantly to slow the German advance during the invasion of Luxembourg on 10 May 1940. The iron gates were knocked down and ramps were built over the concrete blockades to drive over them; some were blown up.
Link to the Wikipage edit URL
extraction datetime
Link to the Wikipage history URL
Wikipage page ID
page length (characters) of wiki page
Wikipage modification datetime
Wiki page out degree
Wikipage revision ID
Link to the Wikipage revision URL
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
foaf:depiction
  • External Image
is foaf:primaryTopic of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 10 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3315 as of Feb 10 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2020 OpenLink Software