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A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo.

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  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo.
  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo. From 1930 to 1956 the station wagon category was mixed with the carryall and SUV category.
  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo. There were also truck-based station wagons made with the Chevrolet Suburban being the first one.
  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo. There were also truck-based station wagons made with the Chevrolet Suburban being the first one. Truck-based stations wagons were built in the platform and chassis of a pickup truck, a panel truck, or a van.
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  • Station wagon
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  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo. The first station wagons, produced in the United States around 1910, were wood-bodied conversions of an existing passenger car. During the 1930s, car manufacturers in the United States, United Kingdom, and France began to produce similarly-styled models, and by the 1950s the wood rear bodywork had been replaced by an all-steel body. Station wagon and estate models sold well from the 1950s to the 1970s, after which sales declined somewhat as minivans and SUVs have increased in popularity.
  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo. From 1930 to 1956 the station wagon category was mixed with the carryall and SUV category. The first station wagons, produced in the United States around 1910, were wood-bodied conversions of an existing passenger car. During the 1930s, car manufacturers in the United States, United Kingdom, and France began to produce similarly-styled models, and by the 1950s the wood rear bodywork had been replaced by an all-steel body. Station wagon and estate models sold well from the 1950s to the 1970s, after which sales declined somewhat as minivans and SUVs have increased in popularity.
  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo. There were also truck-based station wagons made with the Chevrolet Suburban being the first one. The first station wagons, produced in the United States around 1910, were wood-bodied conversions of an existing passenger car. During the 1930s, car manufacturers in the United States, United Kingdom, and France began to produce similarly-styled models, and by the 1950s the wood rear bodywork had been replaced by an all-steel body. Station wagon and estate models sold well from the 1950s to the 1970s, after which sales declined somewhat as minivans and SUVs have increased in popularity.
  • A station wagon, also called an estate car, estate or wagon, is a car body style which has a two-box design, a large cargo area and a rear tailgate that is hinged to open for access to the cargo area. The body style is similar to a hatchback car, but station wagons are longer and are more likely to have the roof-line extended to the rear of the vehicle body (resulting in a vertical rear surface to the car) to provide ample space for luggage and small cargo. There were also truck-based station wagons made with the Chevrolet Suburban being the first one. Truck-based stations wagons were built in the platform and chassis of a pickup truck, a panel truck, or a van. The first station wagons, produced in the United States around 1910, were wood-bodied conversions of an existing passenger car. During the 1930s, car manufacturers in the United States, United Kingdom, and France began to produce similarly-styled models, and by the 1950s the wood rear bodywork had been replaced by an all-steel body. Station wagon and estate models sold well from the 1950s to the 1970s, after which sales declined somewhat as minivans and SUVs have increased in popularity.
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