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Steel guitar is a type of guitar or the method of playing the instrument. Developed in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a steel guitar is usually positioned horizontally; strings are plucked with one hand, while the other hand changes the pitch of one or more strings with the use of a bar or slide called a steel (generally made of metal, but also of glass or other materials).

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  • Steel guitar is a type of guitar or the method of playing the instrument. Developed in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a steel guitar is usually positioned horizontally; strings are plucked with one hand, while the other hand changes the pitch of one or more strings with the use of a bar or slide called a steel (generally made of metal, but also of glass or other materials).
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and may go by many names, including steel, tone bar, slide, bottleneck and others. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed i
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, and is perhaps the only instrument that ca
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and sliding a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, and is perhaps the only instrument that c
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is plucked while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide span; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and itself is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a s
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide range of notes; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities— infinite glissandos over a wide range of notes and deep vibratos ; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music wi
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide range of notes. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating mu
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music wit
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creat
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. It is a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the op
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The bar makes it a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and move
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. Played this way, a guitar becomes a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. Played this way, a guitar becomes a continuous pitch instrument, meaning the notes it plays are not constrained to discrete intervals. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, thus imitating characteristics of the human voice.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. Played this way, a guitar becomes a continuous pitch instrument, meaning the notes it plays are not constrained to discrete intervals as they would be with frets. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, thus imitating characteristics of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, thus imitating characteristics of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, emulating characteristics of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against the strings. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and glissandos over wide intervals, emulating characteristics of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another) including deep vibratos and glissandos over wide intervals, emulating characteristics of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating characteristics of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila) is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating characteristics of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila) is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (gliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was conceived and popularized in the Hawaiian Islands. The steel guitar's easily recognizable sound became associated with American country music in the mid-twentieth century.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila) is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities (gliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating that characteristic of the human singing voice. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was conceived and popularized in the Hawaiian Islands near the beginning of the twentieth century. The steel guitar's easily recognizable sound became associated with American country music in the mid-twentieth century.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila ) is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, as opposed to a traditional guitar which is played by pressing the fingers between frets. Playing a steel guitar does not use frets and is somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). By moving the bar the player has freedom to slide infinitely and smoothly from note to note (portamento) over wide intervals emulating that feature of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". The bar may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila ) is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, as opposed to a traditional guitar which is played by pressing the fingers between frets. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed lightly against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Playing a steel guitar does not use frets and is somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). By moving the bar the player has freedom to slide infinitely and smoothly from note to note (portamento) over wide intervals, emulating a feature of the human singing voice.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila ) is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings. The bar itself is called a "steel" and is the source of the name "steel guitar". The instrument differs from a traditional guitar in the fact that it does not use frets; conceptually, it is somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, sliding smoothly from one to another over wide intervals and is capable of deep vibratos, emulating the human singing voice. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the steel tone bar is pressed lightly against the strings and moved by the opposite hand.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila ) is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings. The bar itself is called a "steel" and is the source of the name "steel guitar". The instrument differs from a conventional guitar in the fact that it does not use frets; conceptually, it is somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, gliding smoothly over every pitch between notes; it can also produce deep vibratos emulating the human singing voice. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the steel tone bar is pressed lightly against the strings and moved by the opposite hand.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila ) is any guitar played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings. The bar itself is called a "steel" and is the source of the name "steel guitar". The instrument differs from a conventional guitar in that it does not use frets; conceptually, it is somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). Known for its portamento capabilities, gliding smoothly over every pitch between notes, the instrument can also produce deep vibratos emulating the human singing voice. Typically, the strings are plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand, while the steel tone bar is pressed lightly against the strings and moved by the opposite hand.
  • A steel guitar (Hawaiian: kīkākila ) is any guitar played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings. The bar itself is called a "steel" and is the source of the name "steel guitar". The instrument differs from a conventional guitar in that it does not use frets; conceptually, it is somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). Known for its portamento capabilities, gliding smoothly over every pitch between notes, the instrument can produce a sinuous crying sound and deep vibrato emulating the human singing voice. Typically, the strings are plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand, while the steel tone bar is pressed lightly against the strings and moved by the opposite hand.
rdfs:label
  • Steel guitar
has abstract
  • Steel guitar is a type of guitar or the method of playing the instrument. Developed in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a steel guitar is usually positioned horizontally; strings are plucked with one hand, while the other hand changes the pitch of one or more strings with the use of a bar or slide called a steel (generally made of metal, but also of glass or other materials).
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and may go by many names, including steel, tone bar, slide, bottleneck and others. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar may look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player would use a tubular object around his finger, and it would be called a slide, and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues-style music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be held in the hand and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to a "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the steel guitar sound became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electronic amplification enabled subsequent development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and may go by many names, including steel, tone bar, slide, bottleneck and others. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar may look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player would use a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues-style music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed horizontally across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be held in the hand and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to a "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the steel guitar sound became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electronic amplification enabled subsequent development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and may go by many names, including steel, tone bar, slide, bottleneck and others. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar may look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player would use a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues-style music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed horizontally across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be held in the hand and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to a "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the steel guitar sound became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing the instruments to be redesigned, in many cases bearing no resemblance to the shape of a traditional guitar. Electronic amplification enabled subsequent development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar. It also allowed slide players to take a prominent role in blues and rock music.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and may go by many names, including steel, tone bar, slide, bottleneck and others. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar may look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player would use a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues-style music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed horizontally across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be held in the hand and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to a "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the steel guitar sound became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing the instruments to be redesigned, in many cases bearing no resemblance to the shape of a traditional guitar. Electronic amplification enabled subsequent development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar may look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player would use a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to a "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the steel guitar sound became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing the instruments to be redesigned, in many cases bearing no resemblance to the shape of a traditional guitar. Electronic amplification enabled subsequent development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar may look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player would use a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as lap style or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the steel guitar sound became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing the instruments to be made without any resonant chamber. This opened the possibility of new designs bearing no resemblance to a traditional guitar shape. Electronic amplification enabled subsequent development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make a glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger and it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar may look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the steel guitar sound became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing the instruments to be made without any resonant chamber. This opened the possibility of new designs bearing no resemblance to a traditional guitar shape. Electronic amplification enabled subsequent development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A Steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing the instruments to be made without any resonant chamber. This opened the possibility of new designs bearing no resemblance to a traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing the instruments to be made without any resonant chamber. This opened the possibility of new designs bearing no resemblance to a traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing new designs without any resonant chamber. This opened the door for new instruments bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". The hard object may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing new designs without any resonant chamber. This opened the door for new instruments bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing new designs without any resonant chamber. This opened the door for new instruments bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played using a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique would be called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing new designs without any resonant chamber. This opened the door for new instruments bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar", typically used in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. The electric guitar pickup was invented in 1934, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments– but also allowing new designs without any resonant chamber. This opened the door for new instruments bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a hard object against the strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. In 1934, the electric guitar pickup was invented , allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used was historically called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap style" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, and is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in this manner. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. A steel guitar may also be played in a horizontal position, a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku, with the instrument placed across the knees or otherwise supported. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and moving a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, and is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in this manner. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees– a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played by pressing and sliding a steel bar or similar object against plucked strings that allows the player to make an infinite smooth glissando or deep vibrato that is not possible with the fingers alone. The hard object used is called a "steel" and this is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, and is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in this manner. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees– a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is plucked while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide span; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and itself is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be or look like an ordinary guitar and be played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees– a technique popularized in Hawaii in the 1890s by Joseph Kekuku. In this case, the hard object would be a solid bar held in the hand (see photo) and called a "steel" or "tone bar" and that type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body). In that case, the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is plucked while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide span; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and itself is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) an ordinary guitar and be played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body); the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. From its first use in Hawaii in the 19th century, the sound of a steel guitar became popular in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and spawned a family of instruments designed specifically to be played with the guitar in a horizontal position. The first instrument in this chronology was the Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is plucked while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide span; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and itself is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) an ordinary guitar and be played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body); the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the steel guitar and Hawaiian music became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is plucked while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide span; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and itself is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) an ordinary guitar and be played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body); here the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the steel guitar and Hawaiian music became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is plucked while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide span; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and itself is the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) an ordinary guitar and be played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body); here the player uses a tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide", and the technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music and the steel guitar became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while holding a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities, with deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide range of notes; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide". This technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music and the steel guitar became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities— infinite glissandos over a wide range of notes and deep vibratos ; it is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide". This technique is called "slide guitar" and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music and the steel guitar became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. The invention also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide range of notes. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was developed in the Hawaiian Islands. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African-American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music and the steel guitar became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over a wide range of notes. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was developed in the Hawaiian Islands. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in Hawaii in the 1890s popularized by Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music and the steel guitar became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification also allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in the 1890s popularized by Hawaiian musician Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, featuring ukulele and steel guitar, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was born and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in the 1890s popularized by Hawaiian musician Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, featuring ukulele and steel guitar, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The instrument is known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was born and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in the 1890s popularized by Hawaiian musician Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, featuring ukulele and steel guitar, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. It is a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was born and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in the 1890s popularized by Hawaiian musician Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, featuring ukulele and steel guitar, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. It is a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was born and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in the 1890s popularized by Hawaiian musician Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, showcasing steel guitar and ukulele, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The bar makes it a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was born and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in the 1890s popularized by Hawaiian musician Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, showcasing steel guitar and ukulele, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. Played this way, a guitar becomes a continuous pitch instrument known for its portamento capabilities including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals. It is perhaps the only instrument that can play full chords in portamento. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was born and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, but played in a horizontal position, placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported– a technique developed in the 1890s popularized by Hawaiian musician Joseph Kekuku. This type of playing is referred to as "lap steel" or "Hawaiian style". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, showcasing steel guitar and ukulele, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic changes in these instruments came after 1934, when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification allowed new guitars to be designed without any resonant chamber, bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification led to the development of the electrified lap steel, then the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. Played this way, a guitar becomes a continuous pitch instrument, meaning the notes it plays are not constrained to discrete intervals. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, thus imitating characteristics of the human voice. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was born and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, except played placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported in a horizontal position— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, showcasing steel guitar and ukulele, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. After 1934, dramatic design changes in these instruments began when the electric guitar pickup was invented, allowing steel guitars to be heard equally with other instruments. Electrification meant that resonant chambers were no longer needed on these instruments, and they could be manufactured bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. Electronic amplification in the mid 1930s led to the development of the electrified lap steel, the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Later, the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar were created.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. Played this way, a guitar becomes a continuous pitch instrument, meaning the notes it plays are not constrained to discrete intervals as they would be with frets. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, thus imitating characteristics of the human singing voice. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, except played placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported in a horizontal position— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, showcasing steel guitar and ukulele, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. After 1934, dramatic design changes in these instruments began when the electric guitar pickup was invented. The first electric stringed instrument of any kind was a lap steel guitar. Electrification meant not only that the steel guitar, could now be heard, but that resonant chambers were no longer needed on these instruments and they could be manufactured bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. The instrument's evolution continued to the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. Played this way, a guitar becomes a continuous pitch instrument, meaning the notes it plays are not constrained to discrete intervals as they would be with frets. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, thus imitating characteristics of the human singing voice. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". It may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar, except played placed across the player's knees or otherwise supported in a horizontal position— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the Hawaiian music, showcasing steel guitar and ukulele, became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant not only that guitars could now be heard equally with other instruments, but that their resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. The instrument's evolution continued to the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, thus imitating characteristics of the human singing voice. The object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and developed in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". It was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the steel guitar in Hawaiian music became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant not only that guitars could now be heard equally with other instruments, but that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. The instrument's evolution continued to the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar object against the strings. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and smooth glissandos over wide intervals, emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and popularized in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of the steel guitar in Hawaiian music became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. Its popularity spawned the creation of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar also called a lap steel; next was a lap steel with a resonator to make it louder. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant not only that guitars could now be heard equally with other instruments, but that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. The instrument's evolution continued to the console steel, and the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against the strings. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and glissandos over wide intervals, emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and popularized in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music featuring the steel guitar in became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and its popularity spawned the manufacture of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar, also called a lap steel; but the instrument suffered from not being loud enough to be heard over accompanying instruments. An invention called a resonator was added to a lap steel to make more audible. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant not only that guitars could now be heard equally with other instruments, but that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. The instrument's evolution led to table-top instruments in a metal frame with legs called "console steels", which were technologically improved to become the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against the strings. The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding from one note to another) including deep vibratos and glissandos over wide intervals, emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. It is essentially like playing a guitar with one finger. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and popularized in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music featuring the steel guitar in became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and its popularity spawned the manufacture of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar, also called a lap steel; but the instrument suffered from not being loud enough to be heard over accompanying instruments. An invention called a resonator was added to a lap steel to make more audible. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant not only that guitars could now be heard equally with other instruments, but that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape, e.g., a rectangular block. The instrument's evolution led to table-top instruments in a metal frame with legs called "console steels", which were technologically improved to become the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another) including deep vibratos and glissandos over wide intervals, emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and popularized in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music featuring the steel guitar in became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and its popularity spawned the manufacture of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar, also called a lap steel; but the instrument suffered from not being loud enough to be heard over accompanying instruments. An invention called a resonator was added to a lap steel to make more audible. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant not only that guitars could now be heard equally with other instruments, but that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured in any shape, even a rectangular block bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape. The instrument's evolution led to table-top instruments in a metal frame with legs called "console steels", which were technologically improved to become the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and popularized in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music featuring the steel guitar in became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and its popularity spawned the manufacture of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar, also called a lap steel; but the instrument suffered from not being loud enough to be heard over accompanying instruments. An invention called a resonator was added to a lap steel to make more audible. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant not only that guitars could now be heard equally with other instruments, but that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured in any shape, even a rectangular block bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape. The instrument's evolution led to table-top instruments in a metal frame with legs called "console steels", which were technologically improved to become the pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was concieved and popularized in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music featuring the steel guitar in became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and its popularity spawned the manufacture of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar, also called a lap steel; but the instrument suffered from not being loud enough to be heard over accompanying instruments. An invention called a resonator was added to a lap steel to make more audible. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant that these guitars would now be more audible and thus allowed more solo opportunities; it also meant that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured in any shape, even a rectangular block bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape. This evolution led to table-top instruments in a metal frame with legs called "console steels", which were technologically improved to become the more versatile pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was conceived and popularized in Hawaii. A steel guitar might be (or resemble) a traditional guitar played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music featuring the steel guitar in became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and its popularity spawned the manufacture of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar, also called a lap steel; but the instrument suffered from not being loud enough to be heard over accompanying instruments. An invention called a resonator was added to a lap steel to make more audible. Dramatic design changes in these instruments began to appear after 1934 when the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp. Beauchamp's lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification meant that these guitars would now be more audible and thus allowed more solo opportunities; it also meant that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential. Steel guitars could be manufactured in any shape, even a rectangular block bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape. This evolution led to table-top instruments in a metal frame with legs called "console steels", which were technologically improved to become the more versatile pedal steel guitar.
  • A steel guitar is any type of guitar that is played while moving a steel bar or similar hard object against plucked strings, a concept somewhat akin to playing a guitar with one finger (the bar). The steel guitar is known for its portamento capabilities (sliding smoothly from one note to another), emulating characteristics of the human singing voice. The hard object held against the strings is called a "steel" and is itself the origin of the name "steel guitar". This may be a solid bar held in the hand or a tubular object placed around the player's finger; it may go by many names, including "steel", "tone bar", "slide", “slide bar”, "bottleneck" and others. The strings are typically plucked (not strummed) by the fingers of the dominant hand while the tone bar (steel) is pressed against the strings and moved by the opposite hand. Creating music with a slide of some type has been traced back to primitive stringed instruments in African culture, but the modern instrument was conceived and popularized in Hawaii. One type of steel guitar is a an ordinary guitar that is played in a horizontal position across the player's knees— a technique popularized by Joseph Kekuku in Hawaii in the 1890s. This type of playing is referred to as "Hawaiian style" or "lap steel". A steel guitar may also be played in the traditional position (flat against the body) with the player using a hard tubular object around his finger, then called a "slide" and the technique called "slide guitar". This style was developed in the Mississippi Delta by solo African American blues artists near the beginning of the twentieth century and is typically heard in blues or rock music. The term "bottleneck" was historically used to describe this type of playing. The sound of Hawaiian music featuring the steel guitar in became a major musical trend in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and its popularity spawned the manufacture of guitars designed specifically to be played horizontally. The first instrument in this chronology was the acoustic Hawaiian guitar, also called a lap steel. An invention called a resonator was soon added to a lap steel to make it more audible. In 1934, the electric guitar pickup was invented by a steel player named George Beauchamp; his lap steel guitar was the first electric stringed instrument of any kind. Electrification made these guitars more audible and thus opened up more opportunities for steel guitar solos; it also meant that their traditional resonant chambers were no longer essential; steel guitars could be manufactured in any shape, even a rectangular block bearing little or no resemblance to the traditional guitar shape. This led to table-top instruments in a metal frame on legs called "console steels", which were technologically improved to become the more versatile pedal steel guitar.
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