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The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad of Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows.

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  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad of Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows.
  • |vgs= |books=|novels=|comics=|magazines=|strips=|radio=|soundtracks=|music=|toys= Ultra-ActS.H. Figuarts|otherlabel1=|otherdata1=|otherlabel2=|otherdata2=|otherlabel3=|otherdata3=}} The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Game
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well-known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with the Toei-produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well-known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu TV shows.
  • w|image= Image:Ultraman bandai eurodata.png|caption= Ultraman Nexus Junis statue outside Bandai HQ in Tokyo|title=Ultra Series|creator=Eiji TsuburayaToru Narita, Tsuburaya Productions|origin=Ultra Q (1966) Ultraman (1966-1967)|films= |tv= |plays=|musicals=|games=|rpgs=|vgs= |books=|novels=|comics=|magazines=|strips=|radio=|soundtracks=|music=|toys= Ultra-ActS.H. Figuarts|otherlabel1=|otherdata1=|otherlabel2=|otherdata2=|otherlabel3=|otherdata3=}}
  • ULTRAMAN ARE ALWAYS REAL BELIEVE IN LIGHT AND YOU WILL BE ONE The Ultraman brand generated US$7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • Belive in Ultraman The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with the Toei-produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well-known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu TV shows.
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  • Ultra Series
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  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad of Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated $7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are popular in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated $7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are popular in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated $7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated $7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Spider-Man in U.S. culture.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated $7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Spider-Man in U.S. culture. also the best Ultraman is Ultraman Tiga and Taiga.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated $7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Spider-Man in U.S. culture. also the best Ultraman is Ultraman Farras and Rayhan.
  • |vgs= |books=|novels=|comics=|magazines=|strips=|radio=|soundtracks=|music=|toys= Ultra-ActS.H. Figuarts|otherlabel1=|otherdata1=|otherlabel2=|otherdata2=|otherlabel3=|otherdata3=}} The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated $7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated US$7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with Toei produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well-known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series, and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu shows. The Ultraman brand generated US$7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with the Toei-produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well-known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu TV shows. The Ultraman brand generated US$7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • w|image= Image:Ultraman bandai eurodata.png|caption= Ultraman Nexus Junis statue outside Bandai HQ in Tokyo|title=Ultra Series|creator=Eiji TsuburayaToru Narita, Tsuburaya Productions|origin=Ultra Q (1966) Ultraman (1966-1967)|films= |tv= |plays=|musicals=|games=|rpgs=|vgs= |books=|novels=|comics=|magazines=|strips=|radio=|soundtracks=|music=|toys= Ultra-ActS.H. Figuarts|otherlabel1=|otherdata1=|otherlabel2=|otherdata2=|otherlabel3=|otherdata3=}} The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with the Toei-produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well-known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu TV shows. The Ultraman brand generated US$7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • ULTRAMAN ARE ALWAYS REAL BELIEVE IN LIGHT AND YOU WILL BE ONE The Ultraman brand generated US$7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
  • Belive in Ultraman The Ultra Series (Japanese: ウルトラシリーズ, Hepburn: Urutora Shirīzu), also known as Ultraman, is the collective name for all media produced by Tsuburaya Productions featuring Ultraman, his many brethren, and the myriad Ultra Monsters. Debuting with Ultra Q and then Ultraman in 1966, the Ultra Series is one of the most prominent tokusatsu superhero genre productions from Japan, along with the Toei-produced series Kamen Rider, Super Sentai and the Metal Heroes. The Ultra Series is also one of the most well-known examples of the daikaiju (大怪獣, "giant monster") genre, along with Toho's Godzilla series and Daiei Film's Gamera series. However, the Ultra Series also falls into the kyodai hīro (巨大ヒーロー, "giant hero") subgenre of tokusatsu TV shows. The Ultraman brand generated US$7.4 billion in merchandising revenue from 1966 to 1987, equivalent to more than $17 billion adjusted for inflation. Ultraman was the world's third top-selling licensed character in the 1980s, largely due to his popularity in Asia. References to Ultraman are abundant in Japanese pop culture, much like references to Superman in U.S. culture.
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