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The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be different for personal devices (smartphones, watches etc) and desktop computers. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS.

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  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be different for personal devices (smartphones, watches etc) and desktop computers. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS.
  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be defined a software platform installed upon a computing device such as: desktop and notebook computers (e.g. Microsoft Windows), smartphones (e.g. Apple iOS), and in many other forms, serving varied purposes and roles.
  • [[File:01and also for last quarter (before COVID): --> Windows Android iOS No data ]] The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. On 27 January 2016, Paul Thurrott summarized the operating system market, the day after Apple announced "one billion devices": — Paul Thurrott — makeuseof.com
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  • Usage share of operating systems
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  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be different for personal devices (smartphones, watches etc) and desktop computers. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, Microsoft Windows is generally above 70% in most markets and at 77% to 87.8% globally, Apple's macOS is at around 9.6% to 13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In the personal computing platform area of smartphones and watches Google's Android dominates with over 2.5 billion users. Other mobile phone operating systems include Apple's iOS, KaiOS and Series 30+. Android is more popular than Windows globally; has battled Windows for the most-used rank with them switching sides, but currently has 15% more use (or over 5-percent point difference). On a global scale, iOS has never managed close to half the popularity of Windows; however, mobile operating systems (Android plus iOS) have majority use (in most populous countries, even including the United States, where iOS alone is more popular than Windows) over non-mobile (Windows and e.g. macOS), and had for close to two years, mostly because Android was and continues to be more popular than Windows. There are still countries and continents where mobile devices have never been anywhere near that popular while on all continents some countries have become mobile-majority and still are, including Ireland (where for a while iOS alone was more popular than Windows, and later Android alone) in Europe; the most populous countries and most populous continent, Asia as a whole (e.g. China and India; excluding e.g. Russia), is still mobile-majority at 56.37%. For public Internet servers, Linux is generally counted as dominant, powering well over twice the number of hosts as Windows Server – which is trailed by many smaller players including traditional mainframe OSes. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS.
  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be different for personal devices (smartphones, watches etc) and desktop computers. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, Microsoft Windows is generally above 70% in most markets and at 77% to 87.8% globally, Apple's macOS is at around 9.6% to 13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In the personal computing platform area of smartphones and watches Google's Android dominates with over 2.5 billion users. Other mobile phone operating systems include Apple's iOS, KaiOS and Series 30+. Android is more popular than Windows globally; it has battled Windows for the most-used rank with them switching sides, but currently has 15% more use (or over 5-percent point difference). On a global scale, iOS has never managed close to half the popularity of Windows; however, mobile operating systems (Android plus iOS) have majority use (in most populous countries, even including the United States, where iOS alone is more popular than Windows) over non-mobile (Windows and e.g. macOS), and had for close to two years, mostly because Android was and continues to be more popular than Windows. There are still countries and continents where mobile devices have never been anywhere near that popular while on all continents some countries have become mobile-majority and still are, including Ireland (where for a while iOS alone was more popular than Windows, and later Android alone) in Europe; the most populous countries and most populous continent, Asia as a whole (e.g. China and India; excluding e.g. Russia), is still mobile-majority at 56.37%. For public Internet servers, Linux is generally counted as dominant, powering well over twice the number of hosts as Windows Server – which is trailed by many smaller players including traditional mainframe OSes. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS.
  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be defined a software platform installed upon a computing device such as: desktop and notebook computers (e.g. Microsoft Windows), smartphones (e.g. Apple iOS), and in many other forms, serving varied purposes and roles. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, Microsoft Windows is the most commonly installed OS, at approximately between 77-87.8% globally. Apple's macOS accounts for approximately 9.6-13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In the personal computing platform area of smartphones and watches Google's Android dominates with over 2.5 billion users. Other mobile phone operating systems include Apple's iOS, KaiOS and Series 30+. Android is more popular than Windows globally; it has battled Windows for the most-used rank with them switching sides, but currently has 15% more use (or over 5-percent point difference). On a global scale, iOS has never managed close to half the popularity of Windows; however, mobile operating systems (Android plus iOS) have majority use (in most populous countries, even including the United States, where iOS alone is more popular than Windows) over non-mobile (Windows and e.g. macOS), and had for close to two years, mostly because Android was and continues to be more popular than Windows. There are still countries and continents where mobile devices have never been anywhere near that popular while on all continents some countries have become mobile-majority and still are, including Ireland (where for a while iOS alone was more popular than Windows, and later Android alone) in Europe; the most populous countries and most populous continent, Asia as a whole (e.g. China and India; excluding e.g. Russia), is still mobile-majority at 56.37%. For public Internet servers, Linux is generally counted as dominant, powering well over twice the number of hosts as Windows Server – which is trailed by many smaller players including traditional mainframe OSes. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS.
  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be defined a software platform installed upon a computing device such as: desktop and notebook computers (e.g. Microsoft Windows), smartphones (e.g. Apple iOS), and in many other forms, serving varied purposes and roles. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, Microsoft Windows is the most commonly installed OS, at approximately between 77-87.8% globally. Apple's macOS accounts for approximately 9.6-13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In the personal computing platform area of smartphones and watches Google's Android dominates with over 2.5 billion users. Other mobile phone operating systems include Apple's iOS, KaiOS and Series 30+. Android is more popular than Windows globally; it has battled Windows for the most-used rank with them switching sides, but currently has 15% more use (or over 5-percent point difference). On a global scale, iOS has never managed close to half the popularity of Windows; however, mobile operating systems (Android plus iOS) have majority use (in most populous countries, even including the United States, where iOS alone is more popular than Windows) over non-mobile (Windows and e.g. macOS), and had for close to two years, mostly because Android was and continues to be more popular than Windows. There are still countries and continents where mobile devices have never been anywhere near that popular while on all continents some countries have become mobile-majority and still are, including Ireland (where for a while iOS alone was more popular than Windows, and later Android alone) in Europe; the most populous countries and most populous continent, Asia as a whole (e.g. China and India; excluding e.g. Russia), is still mobile-majority at 56.37%. For public Internet servers, Linux is generally counted as dominant, powering well over twice the number of hosts as Windows Server – which is trailed by many smaller players including traditional mainframe OSes. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS, since November 2017.
  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be defined a software platform installed upon a computing device such as: desktop and notebook computers (e.g. Microsoft Windows), smartphones (e.g. Apple iOS), and in many other forms, serving varied purposes and roles. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, Microsoft Windows is the most commonly installed OS, at approximately between 77 and 87.8% globally. Apple's macOS accounts for approximately 9.6–13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In the personal computing platform area of smartphones and watches Google's Android dominates with over 2.5 billion users. Other mobile phone operating systems include Apple's iOS, KaiOS and Series 30+. Android is more popular than Windows globally; it has battled Windows for the most-used rank with them switching sides, but currently has 15% more use (or over 5-percent point difference). On a global scale, iOS has never managed close to half the popularity of Windows; however, mobile operating systems (Android plus iOS) have majority use (in most populous countries, even including the United States, where iOS alone is more popular than Windows) over non-mobile (Windows and e.g. macOS), and had for close to two years, mostly because Android was and continues to be more popular than Windows. There are still countries and continents where mobile devices have never been anywhere near that popular while on all continents some countries have become mobile-majority and still are, including Ireland (where for a while iOS alone was more popular than Windows, and later Android alone) in Europe; the most populous countries and most populous continent, Asia as a whole (e.g. China and India; excluding e.g. Russia), is still mobile-majority at 56.37%. For public Internet servers, Linux is generally counted as dominant, powering well over twice the number of hosts as Windows Server – which is trailed by many smaller players including traditional mainframe OSes. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS, since November 2017.
  • [[File:01and also for last quarter (before COVID): --> Windows Android iOS No data ]] The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be defined a software platform installed upon a computing device such as: desktop and notebook computers (e.g. Microsoft Windows), smartphones (e.g. Apple iOS), and in many other forms, serving varied purposes and roles. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, Microsoft Windows is the most commonly installed OS, at approximately between 77 and 87.8% globally. Apple's macOS accounts for approximately 9.6–13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In tf name="Sales15">"Gartner Says Worldwide PC Shipments Declined 8.3 Percent in Fourth Quarter of 2015: Holiday Sales Provided Little Cheer to PC Vendors in 2015" (Press release). 12 January 2016. Retrieved 15 March 2016.</ref> Gartner includes Macs (running macOS) in PC sales numbers (but not e.g. iPads and Androids), and they individually had a slight increase in sales in 2015. On 28 May 2015, Google announced that there were 1.4 billion Android users and 1 billion Google play users active during that month. This changed to 2 billion monthly active users in May 2017. On 27 January 2016, Paul Thurrott summarized the operating system market, the day after Apple announced "one billion devices": Apple's "active installed base" is now one billion devices. [..] Granted, some of those Apple devices were probably sold into the market place years ago. But that 1 billion figure can and should be compared to the numbers Microsoft touts for Windows 10 (200 million, most recently) or Windows more generally (1.5 billion active users, a number that hasn’t moved, magically, in years), and that Google touts for Android (over 1.4 billion, as of September).My understanding of iOS is that the user base was previously thought to be around 800 million strong, and when you factor out Macs and other non-iOS Apple devices, that's probably about right. But as you can see, there are three big personal computing platforms. — Paul Thurrott Microsoft backed away from their goal of one billion Windows 10 devices in three years (or "by the middle of 2018") and reported on 26 September 2016 that Windows 10 was running on over 400 million devices, and in March 2019 on more than 800 million. By late 2016, Android had been explained to be "killing" Apple's iOS market share (i.e. its declining sales of smartphones, not just relatively but also by number of units, when the whole market is increasing) with the gap between the two is growing ever larger all the time. According to Gartner, Android now boasts a global market share of 86.2 percent. Apple's iOS is a long way behind with a market share of just 12.9 percent. The rest may as well not even exist [..] These figures, which cover the second quarter of 2016, show that Android has actually increased its market share by 4 percent over the last year. All other operating systems are down, with iOS losing 1.7 percent [..] I think it's fair to declare Android the winner in the mobile operating [system] wars at this point. — makeuseof.com As of 9 May 2019, the biggest smartphone companies (by market share) were Samsung, Huawei and Apple, respectively. Gartner's own press release said, "Apple continued its downward trend with a decline of 7.7 percent in the second quarter of 2016", which is their decline, based on absolute number of units, that underestimates the relative decline (with the market increasing), along with the misleading "1.7 percent [point]" decline. That point decline means an 11.6% relative decline (from 14.6% down to 12.9%). Although in units sold Apple is declining, they are almost the only vendor making any profit in the smartphone sector from hardware sales alone. In Q3 2016 for example, they captured 103.6% of the market profits. There are more mobile phone owners than toothbrush owners, with mobile phones the fastest growing technology in history. There are a billion more active mobile phones in the world than people (and many more than 10 billion sold so far with less than half still in use), explained by the fact that some people have more than one, such as an extra for work. All the phones have an operating system, but only a fraction of them are smartphones with an OS capable of running modern applications. Currently 3.1 billion smartphones and tablets are in use across the world (with tablets, a small fraction of the total, generally running the same operating systems, Android or iOS, the latter being more popular on tablets. In 2019, a variant of iOS called iPadOS built for iPad tablets was released).
  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be defined a software platform installed upon a computing device such as: desktop and notebook computers (e.g. Microsoft Windows), smartphones (e.g. Apple iOS), and in many other forms, serving varied purposes and roles. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, Microsoft Windows is the most commonly installed OS, at approximately between 77 and 87.8% globally. Apple's macOS accounts for approximately 9.6–13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In the personal computing platform area of smartphones and watches Google's Android dominates with over 2.5 billion users. Other mobile phone operating systems include Apple's iOS, KaiOS and Series 30+. Android is more popular than Windows globally; it has battled Windows for the most-used rank with them switching sides, but currently has 15% more use (or over 5-percent point difference). On a global scale, iOS has never managed close to half the popularity of Windows; however, it was the most popular operating system in the United States for some months where smartphones (iPhone and Android) had majority share. These mobile operating systems have majority use over non-mobile (Windows and e.g. macOS), mostly because Android was and continues to be more popular than Windows. There are still countries and continents where mobile devices have never been anywhere near that popular while on all continents some countries have become mobile-majority and still are, including Ireland (where for a while iOS alone was more popular than Windows, and later Android alone) in Europe; the most populous countries and most populous continent, Asia as a whole (e.g. China and India; excluding e.g. Russia), is still mobile-majority at 56.37%. For public Internet servers, Linux is generally counted as dominant, powering well over twice the number of hosts as Windows Server – which is trailed by many smaller players including traditional mainframe OSes. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS, since November 2017.
  • The usage share of operating systems is the percentage of computing devices that run each operating system (OS) at any particular time. All such figures are necessarily estimates because data about operating system share is difficult to obtain; there are few reliable primary sources – and no agreed methodologies for its collection. Operating systems can be defined a software platform installed upon a computing device such as: desktop and notebook computers (e.g. Microsoft Windows), smartphones (e.g. Apple iOS), and in many other forms, serving varied purposes and roles. In the area of desktop and laptop computers, is the most commonly installed OS, at approximately between 77 and 87.8% globally. Apple's macOS accounts for approximately 9.6–13%, Google's Chrome OS is up to 6% (in the US) and other Linux distributions are at around 2%. All these figures vary somewhat in different markets, and depending on how they are gathered. In the personal computing platform area of smartphones and watches Google's Android dominates with over 2.5 billion users. Other mobile phone operating systems include Apple's iOS, KaiOS and Series 30+. Android is more popular than Windows globally; it has battled Windows for the most-used rank with them switching sides, but currently has 15% more use (or over 5-percent point difference). On a global scale, iOS has never managed close to half the popularity of Windows; however, it was the most popular operating system in the United States for some months where smartphones (iPhone and Android) had majority share. These mobile operating systems have majority use over non-mobile (Windows and e.g. macOS), mostly because Android was and continues to be more popular than Windows. There are still countries and continents where mobile devices have never been anywhere near that popular while on all continents some countries have become mobile-majority and still are, including Ireland (where for a while iOS alone was more popular than Windows, and later Android alone) in Europe; the most populous countries and most populous continent, Asia as a whole (e.g. China and India; excluding e.g. Russia), is still mobile-majority at 56.37%. For public Internet servers, Linux is generally counted as dominant, powering well over twice the number of hosts as Windows Server – which is trailed by many smaller players including traditional mainframe OSes. The supercomputer field is completely dominated by Linux – with 100% of the TOP500 now running on this OS, since November 2017.
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