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Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a county in the West Midlands of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. Other major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The north-east of Worcestershire includes part of the industrial West Midlands; the rest of the county is largely rural. The county is divided into six administrative districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove.

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  • 52.2 -2.1666666666666665
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  • Worcestershire
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  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a county in the West Midlands of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. Other major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The north-east of Worcestershire includes part of the industrial West Midlands; the rest of the county is largely rural. The county is divided into six administrative districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /ˈwʊstəʃə/ WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /ˈwʊstəʃə/ WUUS-tər-shər, English pronunciation: /-ʃɪə/ -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /[ˈwʊstəʃə], [ˈwʊstəʃɪə̯]/ WUUS-tər-shər, English pronunciation: /-ʃɪə/ -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /[ˈwʊstəʃə], [ˈwʊstəʃɪə̯]/ WUUS-tər-shər, written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town, with a population of +100,000. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, Stourport-on-Severn and Pershore. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The county includes the towns of Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, Stourport-on-Severn and Pershore. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield respectively. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded t
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  • Worcestershire
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  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a county in the West Midlands of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. Other major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The north-east of Worcestershire includes part of the industrial West Midlands; the rest of the county is largely rural. The county is divided into six administrative districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /ˈwʊstəʃə/ WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /ˈwʊstəʃə/ WUUS-tər-shər, English pronunciation: /-ʃɪə/ -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /[ˈwʊstəʃə], [ˈwʊstəʃɪə̯]/ WUUS-tər-shər, English pronunciation: /-ʃɪə/ -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /[ˈwʊstəʃə], [ˈwʊstəʃɪə̯]/ WUUS-tər-shər, written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /[ˈwʊstəʃə], [ˈwʊstəʃɪə̯]/ WUUS-tər-shər, written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town, with a population of +100,000. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire (English pronunciation: /[ˈwʊstəʃə], [ˈwʊstəʃɪə̯]/ WUUS-tər-shər, written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town, with a population of +100,000. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, Stourport-on-Severn and Pershore. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town, with a population of +100,000. The major towns include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, Stourport-on-Severn and Pershore. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield, whilst the rest of Worcestershire is largely rural. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. The county includes the towns of Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, Stourport-on-Severn and Pershore. The historic county also contained Dudley, Stourbridge, Halesowen, Oldbury, Yardley, Kings Norton and Northfield respectively. The current administrative county is divided into six districts: Worcester, Redditch, Wychavon, Malvern Hills, Wyre Forest, and Bromsgrove. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
  • Worcestershire ( () WUUS-tər-shər, -⁠sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a non-metropolitan administrative, ceremonial and historic county, situated in the West Midlands region of England. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county (see History of Worcestershire). Over the centuries the county borders have been modified, but it was not until 1844 that substantial changes were made. This culminated with the abolition of Worcestershire in 1974 with its northern area becoming part of the West Midlands and the rest part of the county of Hereford and Worcester. However, in 1998 the county of Hereford and Worcester was abolished and Worcestershire was reconstituted without the northern area ceded to the West Midlands.
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