20th-century philosophy saw the development of a number of new philosophical schools—including logical positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and poststructuralism. In terms of the eras of philosophy, it is usually labelled as contemporary philosophy (succeeding modern philosophy, which runs roughly from the time of René Descartes until the late 19th to early 20th centuries). The publication of Edmund Husserl's Logical Investigations (1900–1) and Bertrand Russell's The Principles of Mathematics (1903) is considered to mark the beginning of 20th-century philosophy.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • 20th-century philosophy saw the development of a number of new philosophical schools—including logical positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and poststructuralism. In terms of the eras of philosophy, it is usually labelled as contemporary philosophy (succeeding modern philosophy, which runs roughly from the time of René Descartes until the late 19th to early 20th centuries). As with other academic disciplines, philosophy increasingly became professionalized in the twentieth century, and a split emerged between philosophers who considered themselves part of either the "analytic" or "Continental" traditions. However, there have been disputes regarding both the terminology and the reasons behind the divide, as well as philosophers who see themselves as bridging the divide, such as process philosophy advocates and neopragmatists. In addition, philosophy in the twentieth century became increasingly technical and harder for lay people to read. The publication of Edmund Husserl's Logical Investigations (1900–1) and Bertrand Russell's The Principles of Mathematics (1903) is considered to mark the beginning of 20th-century philosophy. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-09-08 21:26:40Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 806549 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 19873 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-09-08 21:26:24Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 96 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 914692465 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • 20th-century philosophy saw the development of a number of new philosophical schools—including logical positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and poststructuralism. In terms of the eras of philosophy, it is usually labelled as contemporary philosophy (succeeding modern philosophy, which runs roughly from the time of René Descartes until the late 19th to early 20th centuries). The publication of Edmund Husserl's Logical Investigations (1900–1) and Bertrand Russell's The Principles of Mathematics (1903) is considered to mark the beginning of 20th-century philosophy. (en)
rdfs:label
  • 20th-century philosophy (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:era of
is dbo:mainInterest of
is dbo:occupation of
is dbo:region of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is rdfs:seeAlso of
is foaf:primaryTopic of