Abila, distinguished as Abila in the Decapolis (Greek: Ἄβιλα Δεκαπολεος, Abila Dekapoleos), and also known for a time as Seleucia (Greek: Σελεύκεια, Seleúkeia), and ancient Raphana, was a city in the Decapolis; the site, now referred to as Quwaylibah (Arabic: قويلبة‎) is occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Abila, distinguished as Abila in the Decapolis (Greek: Ἄβιλα Δεκαπολεος, Abila Dekapoleos), and also known for a time as Seleucia (Greek: Σελεύκεια, Seleúkeia), and ancient Raphana, was a city in the Decapolis; the site, now referred to as Quwaylibah (Arabic: قويلبة‎) is occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments. The natural stone of the Transjordan region is beds of limestone and chalky limestone laid down in marine deposits in the Eocene and raised above sea level as the Belqa Group in the middle Eocene. Their relatively soft stone is extensively transected by eroded wadis and is covered by meters of erosional soil termed terra rossa The Abila site is covered by approximately a meter of another, closely related soil, Rendzina. Both soils are fertile, contributing to the agriculture and arboriculture of the area. Tell Umm al-Amad is also termed Khirbit Umm al-Amad, where Khirbit is "ruined settlement." As the wadi is aligned north-south at that location, Tell Umm al-Amad is dubbed "the south tell." The unit of north and south tells create a defensible elevation similar to an acropolis surrounded on three sides by wadis. The presence of a city wall first constructed in the Iron Age and enhanced under the Macedonians and Romans defined the defensible part of the settlement. In shape the walled city at its peak was an elongated rectangle beginning on the stream-facing slope of Tell Abila and slanting across the depression between the two hills to end at the summit of the south hill. Its name, Umm al-Amad, "Mother of Columns,", suggests that the settlement there was later than the settlement on the north hill; i.e., the buildings with columns were already there when it received its name. The archaeology bears out that the settlement on the north hill was the original Abila. Most of the city was in the saddle-shaped surface between the two hills. The slopes were overcome by terracing the saddle. However defensible, a city on a hill could not exist without native water and food supplies. The name "Abila" is derived from the Semitic word Abel (in Hebrew, "meadow" and in Arabic, "green growth"). The largest site is located amidst verdant agricultural fields near the modern Ain Quweilbeh spring. Roman temples, Byzantine churches and early mosques lie amidst olive groves and wheat fields. The site was submitted to the list of tentative World Heritage sites under criteria I, III and IV on June 18, 2001, by the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-10-16 15:19:09Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 4347965 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 15443 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-10-16 15:17:25Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 48 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 921577338 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
georss:point
  • 32.681111111111115 35.86972222222222
  • 32.681111111111115 35.86972222222222
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Abila, distinguished as Abila in the Decapolis (Greek: Ἄβιλα Δεκαπολεος, Abila Dekapoleos), and also known for a time as Seleucia (Greek: Σελεύκεια, Seleúkeia), and ancient Raphana, was a city in the Decapolis; the site, now referred to as Quwaylibah (Arabic: قويلبة‎) is occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Abila (Decapolis) (en)
owl:sameAs
geo:geometry
  • POINT(35.869720458984 32.68111038208)
geo:lat
  • 32.681110 (xsd:float)
  • 32.681110 (xsd:float)
geo:long
  • 35.869720 (xsd:float)
  • 35.869720 (xsd:float)
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of