The term abjection literally means "the state of being cast off". The term has been explored in post-structuralism as that which inherently disturbs conventional identity and cultural concepts. Among the most popular interpretations of abjection is Julia Kristeva's, pursued particularly in her 1980 work Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. Kristeva describes subjective horror (abjection) as the feeling when an individual experiences, or is confronted by (both mentally and as a body), what Kristeva calls one's "corporeal reality", or a breakdown in the distinction between what is Self and what is Other.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The term abjection literally means "the state of being cast off". The term has been explored in post-structuralism as that which inherently disturbs conventional identity and cultural concepts. Among the most popular interpretations of abjection is Julia Kristeva's, pursued particularly in her 1980 work Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. Kristeva describes subjective horror (abjection) as the feeling when an individual experiences, or is confronted by (both mentally and as a body), what Kristeva calls one's "corporeal reality", or a breakdown in the distinction between what is Self and what is Other. The concept of abjection is best described as the process by which one separates one's sense of self from that which immediately threatens one's sense of life. Abjection prevents the absolute realization of existence, completing the course of biological, social, physical, and spiritual cycles. The best representation of this concept can be imagined as one's reaction to gazing at a human cadaver, or corpse, as a direct reminder of the inevitability of death. The abject is, as such, the process that separates from one's environment what "is not me". Kristeva's concept of abjection is utilized commonly to explain popular cultural narratives of horror, and discriminatory behavior manifesting in misogyny, homophobia, and genocide. The concept of abjection builds on the traditional psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. (en)
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2019-09-11 21:31:38Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 1255078 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 24331 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2019-09-11 21:29:02Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 92 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 915210984 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • The term abjection literally means "the state of being cast off". The term has been explored in post-structuralism as that which inherently disturbs conventional identity and cultural concepts. Among the most popular interpretations of abjection is Julia Kristeva's, pursued particularly in her 1980 work Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. Kristeva describes subjective horror (abjection) as the feeling when an individual experiences, or is confronted by (both mentally and as a body), what Kristeva calls one's "corporeal reality", or a breakdown in the distinction between what is Self and what is Other. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Abjection (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:movement of
is dbo:nonFictionSubject of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of