Alea iacta est ("The die is cast") is a Latin phrase attributed by Suetonius (as iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlea est]) to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 B.C. as he led his army across the Rubicon river in Northern Italy. With this step, he entered Italy at the head of his army in defiance of the Senate and began his long civil war against Pompey and the Optimates.

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  • Alea iacta est ("The die is cast") is a Latin phrase attributed by Suetonius (as iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlea est]) to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 BC as he led his army across the Rubicon river in Northern Italy. With this step, he entered Italy at the head of his army in defiance of the Senate and began his long civil war against Pompey and the Optimates. The phrase has been adopted in Italian (Il dado è tratto), Romanian (Zarurile au fost aruncate), Spanish (La suerte está echada), French (Les dés sont jetés), Portuguese (A sorte está lançada), Greek (Ο κύβος ερρίφθη), Dutch (De teerling is geworpen), German (Der Würfel ist gefallen), Polish (Kości zostały rzucone), Turkish (Ok yaydan çıktı), Hungarian (A kocka el van vetve) and many other languages to indicate that events have passed a point of no return. (en)
  • Alea iacta est ("The die is cast") is a Latin phrase attributed by Suetonius (as iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlea est]) to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 BC as he led his army across the Rubicon river in Northern Italy. With this step, he entered Italy at the head of his army in defiance of the Senate and began his long civil war against Pompey and the Optimates. The phrase has been adopted in Italian (Il dado è tratto), Romanian (Zarurile au fost aruncate), Spanish (La suerte está echada), French (Les jeux sont fait), Portuguese (A sorte está lançada), Greek (Ο κύβος ερρίφθη), Dutch (De teerling is geworpen), German (Der Würfel ist gefallen), Polish (Kości zostały rzucone), Turkish (Ok yaydan çıktı), Hungarian (A kocka el van vetve) and many other languages to indicate that events have passed a point of no return. (en)
  • Alea iacta est ("The die is cast") is a Latin phrase attributed by Suetonius (as iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlea est]) to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 B.C. as he led his army across the Rubicon river in Northern Italy. With this step, he entered Italy at the head of his army in defiance of the Senate and began his long civil war against Pompey and the Optimates. The phrase, either in the original Latin or in translation, is used in many languages to indicate that events have passed a point of no return. (en)
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  • Alea iacta est ("The die is cast") is a Latin phrase attributed by Suetonius (as iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlea est]) to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 B.C. as he led his army across the Rubicon river in Northern Italy. With this step, he entered Italy at the head of his army in defiance of the Senate and began his long civil war against Pompey and the Optimates. (en)
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  • Alea iacta est (en)
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