The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864, in Franklin, Tennessee, as part of the Franklin–Nashville Campaign of the American Civil War. It was one of the worst disasters of the war for the Confederate States Army. Confederate Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee conducted numerous frontal assaults against fortified positions occupied by the Union forces under Maj. Gen. John M.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864, at Franklin, Tennessee, as part of the Franklin–Nashville Campaign of the American Civil War. It was one of the worst disasters of the war for the Confederate States Army. Confederate Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee conducted numerous frontal assaults against fortified positions occupied by the Union forces under Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield and was unable to break through or to prevent Schofield from a planned, orderly withdrawal to Nashville.The Confederate assault of six infantry divisions containing eighteen brigades with 100 regiments numbering almost 20,000 men, sometimes called the "Pickett's Charge of the West", resulted in devastating losses to the men and the leadership of the Army of Tennessee—fourteen Confederate generals (six killed or mortally wounded, seven wounded, and one captured) and 55 regimental commanders were casualties. After its defeat against Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas in the subsequent Battle of Nashville, the Army of Tennessee retreated with barely half the men with which it had begun the short offensive, and was effectively destroyed as a fighting force for the remainder of the war.The 1864 Battle of Franklin was the second military action in the vicinity; a battle in 1863 was a minor action associated with a reconnaissance in force by Confederate cavalry leader Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn on April 10. (en)
  • The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864, in Franklin, Tennessee, as part of the Franklin–Nashville Campaign of the American Civil War. It was one of the worst disasters of the war for the Confederate States Army. Confederate Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee conducted numerous frontal assaults against fortified positions occupied by the Union forces under Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield and was unable to break through or to prevent Schofield from a planned, orderly withdrawal to Nashville.The Confederate assault of six infantry divisions containing eighteen brigades with 100 regiments numbering almost 20,000 men, sometimes called the "Pickett's Charge of the West", resulted in devastating losses to the men and the leadership of the Army of Tennessee—fourteen Confederate generals (six killed, seven wounded, and one captured) and 55 regimental commanders were casualties. After its defeat against Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas in the subsequent Battle of Nashville, the Army of Tennessee retreated with barely half the men with which it had begun the short offensive, and was effectively destroyed as a fighting force for the remainder of the war.The 1864 Battle of Franklin was the second military action in the vicinity; a battle in 1863 was a minor action associated with a reconnaissance in force by Confederate cavalry leader Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn on April 10. (en)
dbo:causalties
  • 2,326 total
dbo:combatant
  • United States
  • Confederate States
dbo:commander
dbo:date
  • 1864-11-30 (xsd:date)
dbo:isPartOfMilitaryConflict
dbo:place
dbo:result
  • Unionvictory
dbo:strength
  • 27,000
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2017-09-27 05:38:17Z (xsd:date)
  • 2018-04-27 14:32:47Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-02-20 04:20:23Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 423215 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 54026 (xsd:integer)
  • 54531 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2018-01-20 14:27:07Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-02-20 04:10:54Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 202 (xsd:integer)
  • 206 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 821443703 (xsd:integer)
  • 884200351 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:align
  • right (en)
dbp:bot
  • InternetArchiveBot (en)
dbp:caption
  • Battle of Franklin, by Kurz and Allison . (en)
  • Battle of Franklin, by Kurz and Allison (en)
dbp:casualties
  • 2326 (xsd:integer)
  • Schofield's estimate: 6,252 Hood's report: 4,500 (en)
  • ParseResult(2326,None,None)
dbp:combatant
  • United States (en)
  • Confederate States (en)
dbp:commander
dbp:conflict
  • Battle of Franklin (en)
dbp:date
  • 1864-11-30 (xsd:date)
  • November 2016 (en)
  • October 2016 (en)
  • ParseResult(1864-11-30,None,None)
dbp:fixAttempted
  • yes (en)
dbp:imageSize
  • 300 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(300,None,None)
dbp:partof
  • the American Civil War (en)
dbp:place
dbp:quote
  • The annals of war may long be searched for a parallel to the desperate valor of the charge of the Army of Tennessee at Franklin, a charge which has been called "the greatest drama in American history." Perhaps its only rival for macabre distinction would be Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. A comparison of the two may be of interest. Pickett's total loss at Gettysburg was 1,354; at Franklin the Army of Tennessee lost over 6,000 dead and wounded. Pickett's charge was made after a volcanic artillery preparation of two hours had battered the defending line. Hood's army charged without any preparation. Pickett's charge was across an open space of perhaps a mile. The advance at Franklin was for two miles in the open, in full view of the enemy's works, and exposed to their fire. The defenders at Gettysburg were protected only by a stone wall. Schofield's men at Franklin had carefully constructed works, with trench and parapet. Pickett's charge was totally repulsed. The charge of Brown and Cleburne penetrated deep into the breastworks, to part of which they clung until the enemy retired. Pickett, once repelled, retired from the field. The Army of Tennessee renewed their charge, time after time. Pickett survived his charge unscathed. Cleburne was killed, and eleven other general officers were killed, wounded or captured. "Pickett's charge at Gettysburg" has come to be a synonym for unflinching courage in the raw. The slaughter-pen at Franklin even more deserves the gory honor. (en)
  • I hereupon decided, before the enemy would be able to reach his stronghold at Nashville, to make that same afternoon another and final effort to overtake and rout him, and drive him in the Big Harpeth river at Franklin, since I could no longer hope to get between him and Nashville, by reason of the short distance from Franklin to that city, and the advantage which the Federals enjoyed in the possession of the direct road. (en)
dbp:result
  • Union victory (en)
dbp:source
  • Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood, Advance and Retreat (en)
  • Stanley F. Horn, The Army of Tennessee (en)
dbp:strength
  • 27000 (xsd:integer)
  • ParseResult(27000,None,None)
dbp:units
dbp:width
  • 30.0
  • 35.0
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
georss:point
  • 35.9174 -86.8733
  • 35.9174 -86.8733
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864, in Franklin, Tennessee, as part of the Franklin–Nashville Campaign of the American Civil War. It was one of the worst disasters of the war for the Confederate States Army. Confederate Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee conducted numerous frontal assaults against fortified positions occupied by the Union forces under Maj. Gen. John M. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Battle of Franklin (1864) (en)
owl:sameAs
geo:geometry
  • POINT(-86.87329864502 35.917400360107)
geo:lat
  • 35.917400 (xsd:float)
  • 35.917400 (xsd:float)
geo:long
  • -86.873299 (xsd:float)
  • -86.873299 (xsd:float)
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Battle of Franklin (en)
is dbo:battle of
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbp:battles of
is foaf:primaryTopic of