The Battle of Greece (also known as Operation Marita, German: Unternehmen Marita) is the common name for the invasion of Allied Greece by Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany in April 1941 during World War II. The Italian invasion in October 1940, which is usually known as the Greco-Italian War, was followed by the German invasion in April 1941. German landings on the island of Crete (May 1941) came after Allied forces had been defeated in mainland Greece. These battles were part of the greater Balkan Campaign of Germany.

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dbo:abstract
  • The Battle of Greece (also known as Operation Marita, German: Unternehmen Marita) is the common name for the invasion of Allied Greece by Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany in April 1941 during World War II. The Italian invasion in October 1940, which is usually known as the Greco-Italian War, was followed by the German invasion in April 1941. German landings on the island of Crete (May 1941) came after Allied forces had been defeated in mainland Greece. These battles were part of the greater Balkan Campaign of Germany. Following the Italian invasion on 28 October 1940, Greece repulsed the initial Italian attack and a counter-attack in March 1941. When the German invasion, known as Operation Marita, began on 6 April, the bulk of the Greek Army was on the Greek border with Albania, then a protectorate of Italy, from which the Italian troops had attacked. German troops invaded from Bulgaria, creating a second front. Greece received a small reinforcement from British, Australian and New Zealand forces in anticipation of the German attack. The Greek army found itself outnumbered in its effort to defend against both Italian and German troops. As a result, the Metaxas defensive line did not receive adequate troop reinforcements and was quickly overrun by the Germans, who then outflanked the Greek forces at the Albanian border, forcing their surrender. British, Australian and New Zealand forces were overwhelmed and forced to retreat, with the ultimate goal of evacuation. For several days, Allied troops played an important part in containing the German advance on the Thermopylae position, allowing ships to be prepared to evacuate the units defending Greece. The German Army reached the capital, Athens, on 27 April and Greece's southern shore on 30 April, capturing 7,000 British, Australian and New Zealand personnel and ending the battle with a decisive victory. The conquest of Greece was completed with the capture of Crete a month later. Following its fall, Greece was occupied by the military forces of Germany, Italy and Bulgaria. Hitler later blamed the failure of his invasion of the Soviet Union, which had to be delayed, on Mussolini's failed conquest of Greece. The theory that the Battle of Greece delayed the invasion of the Soviet Union has been either refuted or downplayed by the majority of historians, who have accused Hitler of trying to deflect blame from himself to his ally, Italy. It nevertheless had serious consequences for the Axis war effort in the North African theatre. Enno von Rintelen, who was the military attaché in Rome, emphasises, from the German point of view, the strategic mistake of not taking Malta. (en)
dbo:causalties
  • 1Italy:
  • 25,067 missing
  • 385 missing
  • 3Germany:
  • 1,099 dead
  • 13,755 dead
  • 3,752 wounded
  • 63,142 wounded
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  • Allies:
  • Axis:
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dbo:date
  • 1940-10-28 (xsd:date)
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  • 1Statistics about the strength and casualties of Italy and Greece refer to both the Greco-Italian War and the Battle of Greece (at least 300,000 Greek soldiers fought in Albania).
  • 3Statistics about German casualties refer to the Balkans Campaign as a whole and are based on Hitler's statements to theReichstagon 4 May 1941.
  • 2IncludingCypriotsandMandatory Palestinians. British, Australian and New Zealand troops were
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dbo:result
  • Axis victory
dbo:strength
  • 1,200 tanks
  • Germany:
  • 100 tanks
  • 163 tanks
  • 1Greece:
  • 1Italy:
  • 200–300 aircraft
  • 262,612 men
  • 463 aircraft
  • 565,000 men
  • 680,000 men
  • 700 aircraft
  • Total: 1,245,000 men
  • 430,000 men
  • 20 tanks
  • Total: 492,612 men
  • British, Australia & New Zealand:
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  • 2019-11-14 12:00:29Z (xsd:date)
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  • The Battle of Greece (also known as Operation Marita, German: Unternehmen Marita) is the common name for the invasion of Allied Greece by Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany in April 1941 during World War II. The Italian invasion in October 1940, which is usually known as the Greco-Italian War, was followed by the German invasion in April 1941. German landings on the island of Crete (May 1941) came after Allied forces had been defeated in mainland Greece. These battles were part of the greater Balkan Campaign of Germany. (en)
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  • Battle of Greece (en)
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  • Battle of Greece (en)
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