The Battle of Krtsanisi (Georgian: კრწანისის ბრძოლა, k'rts'anisis brdzola) was fought between the Qajars of Iran and the Georgian armies of the Kingdom of Kartli-Kakheti and Kingdom of Imereti at the place of Krtsanisi near Tbilisi, Georgia, from September 8 to September 11, 1795, as part of Qajar Emperor Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar's war in response to King Heraclius II of Georgia’s alliance with the Russian Empire.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • The Battle of Krtsanisi (Georgian: კრწანისის ბრძოლა, k'rts'anisis brdzola) was fought between the Qajars of Iran and the Georgian armies of the Kingdom of Kartli-Kakheti and Kingdom of Imereti at the place of Krtsanisi near Tbilisi, Georgia, from September 8 to September 11, 1795, as part of Qajar Emperor Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar's war in response to King Heraclius II of Georgia’s alliance with the Russian Empire. The battle resulted in the decisive defeat of the Georgians, capture, and complete destruction of their capital Tbilisi, as well as the effective reconquest of (eastern) Georgia into the Iranian Empire.Although the Qajars were victorious and Agha Mohammad Khan kept his promise to Heraclius (Erekle) that if he would not drop the alliance with Russia and voluntarily reaccept Iranian suzerainty they would invade his kingdom, it also showed that Russia's own ambitions and agenda were set as the most important reason for Russia not to intervene at Krtsanisi, even though the latter had officially declared in the Treaty of Georgievsk of 1783 that it would protect Erekle's kingdom against any new Iranian ambitions to re-subjugate Georgia. Subsequently, in order to restore Russian prestige, Catherine would launch a punitive campaign against Iran the next year, but it was shortly recalled after her death. The following years remained turbulent and were known as a time of muddle and confusion. Reestablishment of Iranian rule over Georgia did not last long, for the shah was assassinated in 1797 in Shusha, and the Georgian king had died the year after. With Georgia laying in ruins and the central rule in Iran being concerned with the next heir to the throne, it opened the way for Georgia's annexation by Russia several years later by Tsar Paul.As Iran could not permit or allow the cession of Transcaucasia and Dagestan, which were integral parts of Iran for centuries, the consequences of the Krtsanisi battle directly led to the bitter Russo-Persian War (1804-1813) and Russo-Persian War (1826-1828), in which Fath Ali Shah, Agha Mohammad Khan's successor, attempted to reverse Russian military advances and restore Iranian authority north of the Aras and Kura rivers. After these wars, Iran ceded Transcaucasia and Dagestan to imperial Russia per the Treaty of Gulistan (1813) and the Treaty of Turkmenchay (1828). (en)
  • The Battle of Krtsanisi (Georgian: კრწანისის ბრძოლა, k'rts'anisis brdzola) was fought between the Qajars of Iran and the Georgian armies of the Kingdom of Kartli-Kakheti and Kingdom of Imereti at the place of Krtsanisi near Tbilisi, Georgia, from September 8 to September 11, 1795, as part of Qajar Emperor Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar's war in response to King Heraclius II of Georgia’s alliance with the Russian Empire. The battle resulted in the decisive defeat of the Georgians, capture, and complete destruction of their capital Tbilisi, as well as the temporary absorption of eastern parts of Georgia into the Iranian Empire.Although the Qajars were victorious and Agha Mohammad Khan kept his promise to Heraclius (Erekle) that if he would not drop the alliance with Russia and voluntarily reaccept Iranian suzerainty they would invade his kingdom, it also showed that Russia's own ambitions and agenda were set as the most important reason for Russia not to intervene at Krtsanisi, even though the latter had officially declared in the Treaty of Georgievsk of 1783 that it would protect Erekle's kingdom against any new Iranian ambitions to re-subjugate Georgia. Subsequently, in order to restore Russian prestige, Catherine would launch a punitive campaign against Iran the next year, but it was shortly recalled after her death. The following years remained turbulent and were known as a time of muddle and confusion. Reestablishment of Iranian rule over Georgia did not last long, for the shah was assassinated in 1797 in Shusha, and the Georgian king had died the year after. With Georgia laying in ruins and the central rule in Iran being concerned with the next heir to the throne, it opened the way for Georgia's annexation by Russia several years later by Tsar Paul.As Iran could not permit or allow the cession of Transcaucasia and Dagestan, which were integral parts of Iran for centuries, the consequences of the Krtsanisi battle directly led to the bitter Russo-Persian War (1804-1813) and Russo-Persian War (1826-1828), in which Fath Ali Shah, Agha Mohammad Khan's successor, attempted to reverse Russian military advances and restore Iranian authority north of the Aras and Kura rivers. After these wars, Iran ceded Transcaucasia and Dagestan to imperial Russia per the Treaty of Gulistan (1813) and the Treaty of Turkmenchay (1828). (en)
dbo:causalties
  • 15,000captives (civilians) moved to mainland Persia
  • 4,000 troops killed. Unknown number of wounded or captured
dbo:combatant
  • *Erivan Khanate
  • *Ganja Khanate
  • border|22pxKingdom of Imereti
  • border|22pxKingdom of Kartli-Kakheti
  • 22pxQajar Persia
dbo:commander
dbo:date
  • 1795-09-11 (xsd:date)
dbo:isPartOfMilitaryConflict
dbo:place
dbo:result
  • Qajarvictory
dbo:strength
  • 35,000 or 40,000
  • border|22px2,000
  • border|22px3,000
dbo:territory
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2017-09-27 05:41:54Z (xsd:date)
  • 2018-04-27 14:36:14Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-03-28 10:53:36Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 1263763 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 28310 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2018-04-03 15:06:39Z (xsd:date)
  • 2019-03-28 10:48:23Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 145 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 834025165 (xsd:integer)
  • 889849259 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:caption
  • Battle of Krtsanisi by Valerian Sidamon-Eristavi (en)
dbp:casualties
  • 4000 (xsd:integer)
  • 13000 (xsd:integer)
  • 15000 (xsd:integer)
dbp:combatant
dbp:commander
dbp:conflict
  • Battle of Krtsanisi (en)
dbp:date
  • --09-08
  • (en)
dbp:imageSize
  • 300 (xsd:integer)
dbp:partof
  • Persian invasions of Georgia (en)
dbp:place
dbp:result
  • Qajar victory (en)
dbp:strength
  • 35000 (xsd:integer)
  • border|22px 2,000 (en)
  • border|22px 3,000 (en)
dbp:territory
  • Tbilisi conquered and sacked, eastern Georgia briefly reoccupied by Persia (en)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbp:wordnet_type
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Battle of Krtsanisi (Georgian: კრწანისის ბრძოლა, k'rts'anisis brdzola) was fought between the Qajars of Iran and the Georgian armies of the Kingdom of Kartli-Kakheti and Kingdom of Imereti at the place of Krtsanisi near Tbilisi, Georgia, from September 8 to September 11, 1795, as part of Qajar Emperor Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar's war in response to King Heraclius II of Georgia’s alliance with the Russian Empire. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Battle of Krtsanisi (en)
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foaf:name
  • Battle of Krtsanisi (en)
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