Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. The decision effectively overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson decision of 1896, which allowed state-sponsored segregation, insofar as it applied to public education.

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dbo:abstract
  • Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. The decision effectively overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson decision of 1896, which allowed state-sponsored segregation, insofar as it applied to public education. Handed down on May 17, 1954, the Warren Court's unanimous (9–0) decision stated that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." As a result, de jure racial segregation was ruled a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. This ruling paved the way for integration and was a major victory of the Civil Rights Movement, and a model for many future impact litigation cases. However, the decision's fourteen pages did not spell out any sort of method for ending racial segregation in schools, and the Court's second decision in Brown II (349 U.S. 294 (1955)) only ordered states to desegregate "with all deliberate speed". (en)
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  • Paul E. Wilson, John W. Davis, T. Justin Moore (en)
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  • right (en)
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  • --12-09
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  • 1952 (xsd:integer)
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  • Brown v. Board of Education, (en)
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  • --05-17
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  • 1954 (xsd:integer)
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  • Oliver Brown, et al. v. Board of Education of Topeka, et al. (en)
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  • Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. District Court of Kansas reversed. (en)
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  • unanimous (en)
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  • Brown v. Board of Education (en)
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  • Warren (en)
dbp:overturnedPreviousCase
  • Berea College v. Kentucky (en)
  • Cumming v. Richmond County Board of Education (en)
  • Plessy v. Ferguson (en)
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  • 17280.0
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  • Judgment for defendants, 98 F. Supp. 797 (en)
  • Judgment for defendants, 98 F. Supp. 797 ; probable jurisdiction noted, . (en)
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  • --12-08
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  • 1953 (xsd:integer)
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  • 1953 (xsd:integer)
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  • . (en)
  • Brown, 347 U.S. at 489. (en)
  • Brown, 397 U.S. at 495. (en)
  • Brown, 397 U.S. at 493. (en)
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  • We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of "separate but equal" has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. Therefore, we hold that the plaintiffs and others similarly situated for whom the actions have been brought are, by reason of the segregation complained of, deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment. (en)
  • We come then to the question presented: Does segregation of children in public schools solely on the basis of race, even though the physical facilities and other "tangible" factors may be equal, deprive the children of the minority group of equal educational opportunities? (en)
  • Reargument was largely devoted to the circumstances surrounding the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment in 1868. It covered exhaustively consideration of the Amendment in Congress, ratification by the states, then-existing practices in racial segregation, and the views of proponents and opponents of the Amendment. This discussion and our own investigation convince us that, although these sources cast some light, it is not enough to resolve the problem with which we are faced. At best, they are inconclusive. (en)
  • The reaction of the white South to this judicial onslaught on its institutions was noisy and stubborn. Certain “border states,” which had formerly maintained segregated school systems, did integrate, and others permitted the token admission of a few Negro students to schools that had once been racially unmixed. However, the Deep South made no moves to obey the judicial command, and in some districts there can be no doubt that the Desegregation decision hardened resistance to integration proposals. (en)
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  • Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. The decision effectively overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson decision of 1896, which allowed state-sponsored segregation, insofar as it applied to public education. (en)
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  • Oliver Brown, et al. v. Board of Education of Topeka, et al. (en)
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