Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell), William Moseley Swain and recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrative technology of using woodcuts illustrations plates to show pictures spread across its pages before the advent of repri

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  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell), William Moseley Swain and recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrative technology of using woodcuts illustrations plates to show pictures spread across its pages before the advent of reprinting photographs directly on newspaper pages. During Grasty's tenure The News built its elaborate tall headquarters and printing plant with a corner clock tower on the southwest corner of East Baltimore and South Streets directly across the street from The Sun's older architectural landmark "" of 1851, on the southwest corner, constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly increasing its circulation and cultural and civic impact on the city as its leading afternoon paper and later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the Upper Midwest in separate transactions then later divesting these newspapers to return again to Maryland to seek ownership of The Sun with a syndicate of wealthy backers. Grasty was also one of the developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned shopping centers and other aspects of the community prior to being offered for sale and development. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Alaziah H.Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrative technology of using woodcuts illustrations plates to show pictures spread across its pages before the advent of reprinting photographs directly on newspaper pages. During Grasty's tenure The News built its elaborate tall headquarters and printing plant with a corner clock tower on the southwest corner of East Baltimore and South Streets directly across the street from The Sun's older architectural landmark "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southwest corner, constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly increasing its circulation and cultural and civic impact on the city as its leading afternoon paper and later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the Upper Midwest in separate transactions then later divesting these newspapers to return again to Maryland to seek ownership of The Sun, after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell, with a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett families. Grasty was also one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned shopping centers and other aspects of the community prior to being offered for sale and development. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H.Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrative technology of using woodcuts illustrations plates to show pictures spread across its pages before the advent of reprinting photographs directly on newspaper pages. During Grasty's tenure The News built its elaborate tall headquarters and printing plant with a corner clock tower on the southwest corner of East Baltimore and South Streets directly across the street from The Sun's older architectural landmark "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southwest corner, constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly increasing its circulation and cultural and civic impact on the city as its leading afternoon paper and later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the Upper Midwest in separate transactions then later divesting these newspapers to return again to Maryland to seek ownership of The Sun, after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell, with a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett families. Grasty was also one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned shopping centers and other aspects of the community prior to being offered for sale and development. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H.Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrative technology of using woodcuts illustrations plates to show pictures spread across its pages before the advent of reprinting photographs directly on newspaper pages. During Grasty's tenure The News built its elaborate tall headquarters and printing plant with a corner clock tower on the southwest corner of East Baltimore and South Streets directly across the street from The Sun''s older architectural landmark of the "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southwest corner, constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly revamping the appearence of the paper with more graphic illustrations, the first photographs, increasing its circulation and cultural and civic impact on the city as its leading afternoon paper and later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the Upper Midwest in separate transactions then later divesting these newspapers to return again to Maryland to seek ownership of The Sun, after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell, with a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett families. Grasty was also one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned shopping centers and other aspects of the community prior to being offered for sale and development. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H.Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrative technology of using woodcuts illustrations plates to show pictures spread across its pages before the advent of reprinting photographs directly on newspaper pages. During Grasty's tenure The News built its elaborate tall headquarters/editorial offices and printing plant six stories high with a corner clock tower also with cast iron facade built around 1875, on the southwest corner of East Baltimore Street and South Street, directly across South street from The Sun''s quarter-century older architectural (and cultural/civic/political crossroads) landmark of the "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southeast corner, one of the first constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly revamping the appearence of the paper with more graphic illustrations, the first wood-cut drawings ressembling the new science/art of photography, plus more crime and feature stories, soon increasing its circulation with an explosive cultural and civic impact on the city within a few years as its leading afternoon paper. Grasty however, later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the Upper Midwest in separate transactions, then later divesting these newspapers to return again a few years later to Maryland to seek the "apple of his eye" (and hidden longtime goal) - the ownership of The Sun, now after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell after a 51 years career, assembling a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett (of B. & O. Railroad fame and ancient influential banking/investment firm) families. Grasty also became one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned attractive shopping centers, curving roads and driveways, large homes with porches and spacious lawns, with a large amount of retained shade trees and landscaped shrubbery/flower beds and other aspects of the new unprecedented community prior to being offered with heavy demand for lot sales and development. The Roland Park Company, inspired by the landscaping architectural work of Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and his brother, both sons of an equally famous father's earlier mid/late 19th century works, working as the Olmsted Brothers firm. The company with continued Olmsted imput continued its suburban developments in later decades in north Baltimore beyond the old city limits of 1818-1888 at Boundary Avenue (later renamed North Avenue), with laying out on adjacent lands of Guilford (on the old Abell / McDonald summer/country estate and mansion) beginning in 1914, following with Homeland a few years later, during Grasty's post-newspaper career, semi-retirement. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News (also known as The Evening News), an afternoon paper begun in 1871, with the second largest city circulation at that time in the 1870s and two decades later, returned to engineer a take-over of his former competitor, the more respected and influential The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837, originally as a "penny paper" by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H. Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor for an additional 24 years. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910, edited by the famous Henry Louis Mencken (H.L. Mencken, 1880-1956), longtime reporter / editor / columnist and author. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and newly popular graphic appearance of its pages, with bolder headlines across several columns of text. The new stye of Grasty's Baltimore paper was also popularized in the nation's largest and influential media market in New York by such publisher/editors as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. These pioneering newspapermen utilized the new illustrative graphic technology of using woodcuts (illustrations plates) to show pictures spread across its pages (before the advent of reprinting photographs printing technology directly on newspaper pages), breaking the previous somewhat monotous style of long unbroken columns of type/text. During Grasty's tenure The News also built its elaborate tall headquarters/editorial offices and printing plant six stories high with a corner clock tower also with cast iron facade built around 1875, on the southwest corner of East Baltimore Street and South Street, directly across South street from The Sun''s quarter-century older architectural (and cultural/civic/political crossroads) landmark of the "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southeast corner, one of the first constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly revamping the appearence of the paper with more graphic illustrations, the first wood-cut drawings ressembling the new science/art of photography, plus more crime and feature stories, soon increasing its circulation with an explosive cultural and civic impact on the city within a few years as its leading afternoon paper. Grasty however, later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the state capital of Minnesota, with the Twin Cities as the largest influential urban areas in the growing developing, former frontier of the Upper Midwest in separate transactions, Later divesting these Minnesota newspapers to return again a few years later to Maryland to seek the "apple of his eye" (and hidden longtime goal) - the ownership of The Sun, now after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell after a 51 years career, assembling a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett (of B. & O. Railroad fame and ancient influential banking/investment firm) families. Grasty also became one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned attractive shopping centers, curving roads and driveways, large homes with porches and spacious lawns, with a large amount of retained shade trees and landscaped shrubbery/flower beds and other aspects of the new unprecedented community prior to being offered with heavy demand for lot sales and development. The Roland Park Company, inspired by the landscaping architectural work of Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and his brother, both sons of an equally famous father's earlier mid/late 19th century works (such as New York's Central Park in the 1850s), working as the Olmsted Brothers firm. The company with continued Olmsted imput continued its suburban developments in later decades in north Baltimore beyond the old city limits of 1818-1888 at Boundary Avenue (later renamed North Avenue), with laying out on adjacent lands of Guilford (on the old Abell / McDonald summer/country estate and mansion) beginning in 1914, following with Homeland a few years later, during Grasty's post-newspaper career, semi-retirement. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News (also known as The Evening News), an afternoon paper begun two decades earlier in 1871, with the second largest city circulation at that time in the 1890s and two decades later by 1910, returned to engineer a take-over of his former competitor, the more respected and influential The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837, originally as a "penny paper" by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H. Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor for an additional 24 years. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in his first year of ownership in 1910, to be first edited by the famous Henry Louis Mencken (H.L. Mencken, 1880-1956), longtime reporter / editor / columnist and author. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and newly popular graphic appearance of its pages, with bolder headlines across several columns of text. The new stye of Grasty's Baltimore paper was also popularized in the nation's largest and influential media market in New York by such publisher/editors as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. These pioneering newspapermen utilized the new illustrative graphic technology of using woodcuts (illustrations plates) to show pictures spread across its pages (before the advent of reprinting photographs printing technology directly on newspaper pages), breaking the previous somewhat monotous style of long unbroken columns of type/text. During Grasty's tenure The News also built its elaborate tall headquarters/editorial offices and printing plant six stories high with a corner clock tower also with cast iron facade built around 1875, on the southwest corner of East Baltimore Street and South Street, directly across South street from The Sun''s quarter-century older architectural (and cultural/civic/political crossroads) landmark of the "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southeast corner, one of the first constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly revamping the appearence of the paper with more graphic illustrations, the first wood-cut drawings ressembling the new science/art of photography, plus more crime and feature stories, soon increasing its circulation with an explosive cultural and civic impact on the city within a few years as its leading afternoon paper. Grasty however, later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the state capital of Minnesota, with the Twin Cities as the largest influential urban areas in the growing developing, former frontier of the Upper Midwest in separate transactions, Later divesting these Minnesota newspapers to return again a few years later to Maryland to seek the "apple of his eye" (and hidden longtime goal) - the ownership of The Sun, now after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell after a 51 years career, assembling a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett (of B. & O. Railroad fame and ancient influential banking/investment firm) families. Grasty also became one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned attractive shopping centers, curving roads and driveways, large homes with porches and spacious lawns, with a large amount of retained shade trees and landscaped shrubbery/flower beds and other aspects of the new unprecedented community prior to being offered with heavy demand for lot sales and development. The Roland Park Company, inspired by the landscaping architectural work of Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and his brother, both sons of an equally famous father's earlier mid/late 19th century works (such as New York's Central Park in the 1850s), working as the Olmsted Brothers firm. The company with continued Olmsted imput continued its suburban developments in later decades in north Baltimore beyond the old city limits of 1818-1888 at Boundary Avenue (later renamed North Avenue), with laying out on adjacent lands of Guilford (on the old Abell / McDonald summer/country estate and mansion) beginning in 1914, following with Homeland a few years later, during Grasty's post-newspaper career, semi-retirement. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News (also known as The Evening News), an afternoon paper begun two decades earlier in 1871, with the second largest city circulation at that time in the 1890s and two decades later by 1910, returned to engineer a take-over of his former competitor, the more respected and influential The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837, originally as a "penny paper" by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H. Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor for an additional 24 years. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in his first year of ownership in 1910, to be first edited by the famous Henry Louis Mencken (H.L. Mencken, 1880-1956), longtime reporter / editor / columnist and author. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and newly popular graphic appearance of its pages, with bolder headlines across several columns of text. The new stye of Grasty's Baltimore paper was also popularized in the nation's largest and influential media market in New York by such publisher/editors as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. These pioneering newspapermen utilized the new illustrative graphic technology of using woodcuts (illustrations plates) to show pictures spread across its pages (before the advent of reprinting photographs printing technology directly on newspaper pages), breaking the previous somewhat monotous style of long unbroken columns of type/text. During Grasty's tenure The News also built its elaborate tall headquarters/editorial offices and printing plant six stories high with a corner clock tower also with cast iron facade built around 1875, on the southwest corner of East Baltimore Street and South Street, directly across South street from The Sun''s quarter-century older architectural (and cultural/civic/political crossroads) landmark of the "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southeast corner, one of the first constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly revamping the appearence of the paper with more graphic illustrations, the first wood-cut drawings resembling the new science/art of photography, plus more crime and feature stories, soon increasing its circulation with an explosive cultural and civic impact on the city within a few years as its leading afternoon paper. Grasty however, later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the state capital of Minnesota, with the Twin Cities as the largest influential urban areas in the growing developing, former frontier of the Upper Midwest in separate transactions, Later divesting these Minnesota newspapers to return again a few years later to Maryland to seek the "apple of his eye" (and hidden longtime goal) - the ownership of The Sun, now after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell after a 51 years career, assembling a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett (of B. & O. Railroad fame and ancient influential banking/investment firm) families. Grasty also became one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned attractive shopping centers, curving roads and driveways, large homes with porches and spacious lawns, with a large amount of retained shade trees and landscaped shrubbery/flower beds and other aspects of the new unprecedented community prior to being offered with heavy demand for lot sales and development. The Roland Park Company, inspired by the landscaping architectural work of Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and his brother, both sons of an equally famous father's earlier mid/late 19th century works (such as New York's Central Park in the 1850s), working as the Olmsted Brothers firm. The company with continued Olmsted imput continued its suburban developments in later decades in north Baltimore beyond the old city limits of 1818-1888 at Boundary Avenue (later renamed North Avenue), with laying out on adjacent lands of Guilford (on the old Abell / McDonald summer/country estate and mansion) beginning in 1914, following with Homeland a few years later, during Grasty's post-newspaper career, semi-retirement. (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863 – January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News (also known as The Evening News), an afternoon paper begun two decades earlier in 1871, with the second largest city circulation at that time in the 1890s and two decades later by 1910, returned to engineer a take-over of his former competitor, the more respected and influential The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837, originally as a "penny paper" by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H. Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor for an additional 24 years. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in his first year of ownership in 1910, to be first edited by the famous Henry Louis Mencken (H.L. Mencken, 1880-1956), longtime reporter / editor / columnist and author. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and newly popular graphic appearance of its pages, with bolder headlines across several columns of text. The new stye of Grasty's Baltimore paper was also popularized in the nation's largest and influential media market in New York by such publisher/editors as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. These pioneering newspapermen utilized the new illustrative graphic technology of using woodcuts (illustrations plates) to show pictures spread across its pages (before the advent of reprinting photographs printing technology directly on newspaper pages), breaking the previous somewhat monotonous style of long unbroken columns of type/text. During Grasty's tenure The News also built its elaborate tall headquarters/editorial offices and printing plant six stories high with a corner clock tower also with cast iron facade built around 1875, on the southwest corner of East Baltimore Street and South Street, directly across South street from The Sun''s quarter-century older architectural (and cultural/civic/political crossroads) landmark of the "" of 1850-1851, on the opposite southeast corner, one of the first constructed of newly popular cast iron architecture style and supposedly fireproof and an early version of a tall commercial office building that gained increasing popularity in American big cities known as the skyscraper. Grasty ran The News for a number of years greatly revamping the appearance of the paper with more graphic illustrations, the first wood-cut drawings resembling the new science/art of photography, plus more crime and feature stories, soon increasing its circulation with an explosive cultural and civic impact on the city within a few years as its leading afternoon paper. Grasty however, later sold it prior to briefly acquiring the Minnesota Dispatch and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in the state capital of Minnesota, with the Twin Cities as the largest influential urban areas in the growing developing, former frontier of the Upper Midwest in separate transactions, Later divesting these Minnesota newspapers to return again a few years later to Maryland to seek the "apple of his eye" (and hidden longtime goal) - the ownership of The Sun, now after the 1888 death of co-founder/publisher/editor Abell after a 51 years career, assembling a syndicate of wealthy investor backers of the local Black and Garrett (of B. & O. Railroad fame and ancient influential banking/investment firm) families. Grasty also became one of the later developers of the new northern suburban Roland Park community in the early 1890s by the Roland Park Company development firm, said to be an early innovation in community planning, including planned attractive shopping centers, curving roads and driveways, large homes with porches and spacious lawns, with a large amount of retained shade trees and landscaped shrubbery/flower beds and other aspects of the new unprecedented community prior to being offered with heavy demand for lot sales and development. The Roland Park Company, inspired by the landscaping architectural work of Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and his brother, both sons of an equally famous father's earlier mid/late 19th century works (such as New York's Central Park in the 1850s), working as the Olmsted Brothers firm. The company with continued Olmsted imput continued its suburban developments in later decades in north Baltimore beyond the old city limits of 1818-1888 at Boundary Avenue (later renamed North Avenue), with laying out on adjacent lands of Guilford (on the old Abell / McDonald summer/country estate and mansion) beginning in 1914, following with Homeland a few years later, during Grasty's post-newspaper career, semi-retirement. (en)
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  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell), William Moseley Swain and recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrative technology of using woodcuts illustrations plates to show pictures spread across its pages before the advent of repri (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Alaziah H.Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrat (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News an afternoon paper begun in 1871 and later The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837 by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H.Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910. Grasty was named among the great American newspaper publishers and owners, such as James Gordon Bennett, Benjamin Day, Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Grasty owned the Evening News, which had been founded in the early 1870s and utilized the new illustrat (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News (also known as The Evening News), an afternoon paper begun in 1871, with the second largest city circulation at that time in the 1870s and two decades later, returned to engineer a take-over of his former competitor, the more respected and influential The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837, originally as a "penny paper" by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H. Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor for an additional 24 years. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entitled The Evening Sun in 1910, (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863—January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News (also known as The Evening News), an afternoon paper begun two decades earlier in 1871, with the second largest city circulation at that time in the 1890s and two decades later by 1910, returned to engineer a take-over of his former competitor, the more respected and influential The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837, originally as a "penny paper" by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H. Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor for an additional 24 years. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition entit (en)
  • Charles Henry Grasty (March 3, 1863 – January 19, 1924) was a well-known American newspaper operator who at one time controlled The News (also known as The Evening News), an afternoon paper begun two decades earlier in 1871, with the second largest city circulation at that time in the 1890s and two decades later by 1910, returned to engineer a take-over of his former competitor, the more respected and influential The Sun of Baltimore, a morning major daily newspaper, co-founded May 1837, originally as a "penny paper" by Arunah Shepherdson Abell (A.S. Abell, 1806-1888), William Moseley Swain (1809-1868), and Azariah H. Simmons, partners until 1864, when Abell became sole publisher/editor for an additional 24 years. The Sun was recently joined by Grasty with a companion afternoon edition ent (en)
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  • Charles H. Grasty (en)
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  • male (en)
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  • Charles H. Grasty (en)
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