Chhatrapati (Devanagari: छत्रपति) is an Indian royal title. It is often taken to be the equivalent of king or emperor, and was used by the Marathas. The word ‘Chhatrapati’ is a tatpurusha Sanskrit compound of chhatra (parasol or umbrella) and pati (master/lord/ruler). The parasol was considered a symbol of absolute, or even universal, sovereignty and consecrated kingship, and has been used by Buddhist monarchies outside of India, as well.

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  • Chhatrapati (Devanagari: छत्रपती) is an Indian royal title equivalent to an Emperor used by the Marathas. The word ‘Chhatrapati’ is from Sanskrit chhatra (roof or umbrella) and pati (master/owner/ruler); Chhatrapati thus indicates a person who gives shelter to his followers and protects them.In contrast, the Indian Maharaja or Raja, Yuvraj, Rajkumar or Kumar, Senapati, and Sardar most closely equate to the European titles King, Crown Prince, Prince, Duke, and Count, respectively. Shivaji Maharaj adopted this title due to the fact that a lot of the other titles were bestowed on rulers by other powers like Adilshahi or Mughals.Chhatrapti is the title adopted by Shivaji Raje Bhonsle, founder of the Maratha Empire when he got crowned. As described below, Shivaji Maharaj's lineal successors in the royal House of Bhonsle also held the title of Chhatrapati. (en)
  • Chhatrapati (Devanagari: छत्रपति) is an Indian royal title. It is often taken to be the equivalent of king or emperor, and was used by the Marathas. The word ‘Chhatrapati’ is a tatpurusha Sanskrit compound of chhatra (parasol or umbrella) and pati (master/lord/ruler). The parasol was considered a symbol of absolute, or even universal, sovereignty and consecrated kingship, and has been used by Buddhist monarchies outside of India, as well. The title indicates a person who is a sovereign ruler over other princes, and not a vassal.In contrast, the Indian titles of Maharaja or Raja, Yuvraj, Rajkumar or Kumar,and Senapati most can reflect a range of European equivalent meanings, from King, Crown Prince, and Prince, to Duke, Count, or Lord. Shivaji adopted it since other titles were bestowed by other lieges and paramount rulers, like the Adilshahi or Mughals. (en)
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  • Chhatrapati (Devanagari: छत्रपति) is an Indian royal title. It is often taken to be the equivalent of king or emperor, and was used by the Marathas. The word ‘Chhatrapati’ is a tatpurusha Sanskrit compound of chhatra (parasol or umbrella) and pati (master/lord/ruler). The parasol was considered a symbol of absolute, or even universal, sovereignty and consecrated kingship, and has been used by Buddhist monarchies outside of India, as well. (en)
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  • Chhatrapati (en)
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