The Church of Norway (Den norske kirke in Bokmål and Den norske kyrkja in Nynorsk) is an evangelical Lutheran denomination of Protestant Christianity and by far the largest Christian church in Norway. The church became the state church of Norway around 1020 and was established as a separate church intimately integrated with the state as a result of the Lutheran reformation in Denmark–Norway that broke ties with the Holy See in 1536–1537; the King of Norway was the church's head from 1537 to 2012. Historically the church was one of the main instruments of royal power and official authority, and an important part of the state administration; local government was based on the church's parishes with significant official responsibility held by the parish priest. In the 19th and 20th centuries i

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  • The Church of Norway (Den norske kirke in Bokmål and Den norske kyrkja in Nynorsk) is an evangelical Lutheran denomination of Protestant Christianity and by far the largest Christian church in Norway. The church became the state church of Norway around 1020 and was established as a separate church intimately integrated with the state as a result of the Lutheran reformation in Denmark–Norway that broke ties with the Holy See in 1536–1537; the King of Norway was the church's head from 1537 to 2012. Historically the church was one of the main instruments of royal power and official authority, and an important part of the state administration; local government was based on the church's parishes with significant official responsibility held by the parish priest. In the 19th and 20th centuries it gradually ceded most administrative functions to the secular civil service. The modern Constitution of Norway describes the church as the country's "people's church" and requires the King of Norway to be a member. It is by far the largest church in Norway, and until the 19th century membership was mandatory for everyone. Church employees were civil servants from the Reformation until 2017, when the church became a legal entity separate from the state administration. The church of Norway is mentioned specifically in the constitution and is subject to the Church Act. Municipalities are required by law to support activities of parishes and to maintain church buildings and church yards. Other religious communities are entitled to the same level of government subsidies as the Church of Norway. (en)
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  • The Church of Norway (Den norske kirke in Bokmål and Den norske kyrkja in Nynorsk) is an evangelical Lutheran denomination of Protestant Christianity and by far the largest Christian church in Norway. The church became the state church of Norway around 1020 and was established as a separate church intimately integrated with the state as a result of the Lutheran reformation in Denmark–Norway that broke ties with the Holy See in 1536–1537; the King of Norway was the church's head from 1537 to 2012. Historically the church was one of the main instruments of royal power and official authority, and an important part of the state administration; local government was based on the church's parishes with significant official responsibility held by the parish priest. In the 19th and 20th centuries i (en)
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  • Church of Norway (en)
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