Communicative rationality, or communicative reason (German: kommunikative Rationalität), is a theory or set of theories which describes human rationality as a necessary outcome of successful communication. In particular, it is tied to the philosophy of Karl-Otto Apel, Jürgen Habermas, and their program of universal pragmatics, along with its related theories such as those on discourse ethics and rational reconstruction.

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  • Communicative rationality, or communicative reason (German: kommunikative Rationalität), is a theory or set of theories which describes human rationality as a necessary outcome of successful communication. In particular, it is tied to the philosophy of Karl-Otto Apel, Jürgen Habermas, and their program of universal pragmatics, along with its related theories such as those on discourse ethics and rational reconstruction. This view of reason is concerned with clarifying the norms and procedures by which agreement can be reached, and is therefore a view of reason as a form of public justification.According to the theory of communicative rationality, the potential for certain kinds of reason is inherent in communication itself. Building from this, Habermas has tried to formalize that potential in explicit terms. According to Habermas, the phenomena that need to be accounted for by the theory are the "intuitively mastered rules for reaching an understanding and conducting argumentation", possessed by subjects who are capable of speech and action. The goal is to transform this implicit "know-how" into explicit "know-that", i.e. knowledge, about how we conduct ourselves in the realm of "moral-practical" reasoning.The result of the theory is a conception of reason that Habermas sees as doing justice to the most important trends in twentieth century philosophy, while escaping the relativism which characterizes postmodernism, and also providing necessary standards for critical evaluation. (en)
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  • Cooke 1994 (en)
  • Cohen 1995 (en)
  • Eley 1992 (en)
  • Fraser 1987 (en)
  • Habermas 1992 (en)
  • Kompridis 2006 (en)
  • Ryan 1992 (en)
  • Calhoun 1992 (en)
  • Foucault 1988 (en)
dbp:reference
  • Eley, G., 1992, "Nations, Publics, and Political Cultures: Placing Habermas in the Nineteenth Century", in Craig Calhoun, ed., Habermas and the Public Sphere , pp. 289–339. (en)
  • Calhoun, C., 1992, ed., Habermas and the Public Sphere . (en)
  • Habermas, J., 1992, "Themes in Postmetaphysical Thinking", in Postmetaphysical Thinking: Philosophical Essays, W. Hohengarten, trans. , pp. 28–57. (en)
  • Fraser, N., 1987, "What's Critical About Critical Theory? The Case of Habermas and Gender", in Seyla Benhabib and Drucilla Cornell, eds., Feminism as Critique: On the Politics of Gender , pp. 31–56. (en)
  • Cohen, J.L., 1995, "Critical Social Theory and Feminist Critiques: The Debate with Jürgen Habermas", in Johanna Meehan, ed., Feminists Read Habermas: Gendering the Subject of Discourse , pp. 57–90. (en)
  • Foucault, M., 1988, "The Ethic of Care for the Self as a Practice of Freedom", in James Bernauer and David Rasmussen, eds., The Final Foucault , pp. 1–20. (en)
  • Cook, M., 1994, Language and Reason: A Study in Habermas's Pragmatics . (en)
  • Kompridis, N., 2006, Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future. Cambridge, Massachusetts:MIT Press. (en)
  • Ryan, M.P., 1992, "Gender and Public Access: Women's Politics in Nineteenth-Century America", in Craig Calhoun, ed., Habermas and the Public Sphere , pp. 259–288. (en)
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  • Communicative rationality, or communicative reason (German: kommunikative Rationalität), is a theory or set of theories which describes human rationality as a necessary outcome of successful communication. In particular, it is tied to the philosophy of Karl-Otto Apel, Jürgen Habermas, and their program of universal pragmatics, along with its related theories such as those on discourse ethics and rational reconstruction. (en)
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  • Communicative rationality (en)
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