Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II.The concept was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II.The concept was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. The prototype was developed to include automatic control of brightness using a photocell.The prototyped concept was never put into production. The Canadian ideas were however adapted by the US Air Force in its Yehudi lights project. (en)
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy on corvettes during World War II.The concept was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. The prototype was developed to include automatic control of brightness using a photocell.The prototyped concept was never put into production. The Canadian ideas were however adapted by the US Air Force in its Yehudi lights project. (en)
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy on corvettes during World War II. The concept was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. The prototype was developed to include automatic control of brightness using a photocell. The prototyped concept was never put into production. The Canadian ideas were however adapted by the US Air Force in its Yehudi lights project. (en)
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy on corvettes during World War II. The principle was discovered by a Canadian professor, Edmund Godfrey Burr, in 1940. It attracted interest because it could help to hide ships from submarines in the ongoing Battle of the Atlantic, and the research project began early in 1941.The concept behind diffused lighting camouflage was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. The prototype was developed to include automatic control of brightness using a photocell. The prototyped concept was never put into production. The Canadian ideas were however adapted by the US Air Force in its Yehudi lights project. (en)
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to enable a ship to match its background, the night sky, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy on corvettes during World War II. The principle was discovered by a Canadian professor, Edmund Godfrey Burr, in 1940. It attracted interest because it could help to hide ships from submarines in the ongoing Battle of the Atlantic, and the research project began early in 1941. The Royal Navy and the US Navy carried out further equipment development and trials between 1941 and 1943.The concept behind diffused lighting camouflage was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. The prototype was developed to include automatic control of brightness using a photocell. The prototyped concept was never put into production, though the Canadian prototypes did briefly see active service. The Canadian ideas were, however, adapted by the US Air Force in its Yehudi lights project. (en)
dbo:projectKeyword
  • Active camouflage
  • Counter-illumination
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageEditLink
dbo:wikiPageExtracted
  • 2017-09-29 03:17:33Z (xsd:date)
  • 2018-04-29 09:39:05Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageHistoryLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 34434308 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 20114 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageModified
  • 2018-01-13 11:39:45Z (xsd:date)
dbo:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 80 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 820164354 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionLink
dbp:caption
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was prototyped using ordinary commercial light projectors on Canadian corvettes including HMCS Rimouski during World War II (en)
  • HMS Largs by night with incomplete diffused lighting set to maximum brightness, 1942 (en)
dbp:end
  • 1943 (xsd:integer)
dbp:fundingAgency
dbp:keywords
dbp:projectType
  • Military research (en)
dbp:researchObjective
  • Make brightness of ships match their backgrounds (en)
dbp:start
  • 1941 (xsd:integer)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II.The concept was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. (en)
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy on corvettes during World War II.The concept was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. (en)
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to match the background, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy on corvettes during World War II. The concept was to project light on to the sides of a ship so as to make its brightness match its background. For this purpose, projectors were mounted on temporary supports attached to the hull. The prototype was developed to include automatic control of brightness using a photocell. (en)
  • Diffused lighting camouflage was a form of active camouflage using counter-illumination to enable a ship to match its background, the night sky, prototyped by the Royal Canadian Navy on corvettes during World War II. The principle was discovered by a Canadian professor, Edmund Godfrey Burr, in 1940. It attracted interest because it could help to hide ships from submarines in the ongoing Battle of the Atlantic, and the research project began early in 1941. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Diffused lighting camouflage (en)
owl:sameAs
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is foaf:primaryTopic of